James Hooker

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James Hooker
BornJuly 12, 1792
DiedSeptember 2, 1858
Alma materYale College
Litchfield Law School
Spouse(s)Helen Sarah Reade
Children2
Parent(s)James Hooker
Mary Chaffee
RelativesJames Hooker Hamersley (grandson)

James Hooker (July 12, 1792 – September 2, 1858) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

Early life[edit]

Hooker was born in Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut, on July 12, 1792. He was the son of Captain James Hooker (1742–1805), a merchant, and his third wife, Mary (née Chaffee) Hooker.[1]

Hooker graduated from Yale College in 1810,[2] and then studied law at the Litchfield Law School.[3]

Career[edit]

He was Surrogate of Dutchess County from 1828 to 1840. In 1836, he was a presidential elector. In February 1840, he was elected by the New York State Legislature one of the canal commissioners and was legislated out of office by the Act of May 6, 1844, which re-organized the Canal Commission.[4]

Personal life[edit]

He married Helen Sarah Reade (1790–1879),[5] the daughter of John Reade (1745–1808) and Catherine Livingston Reade (1756–1829).[6] Together, they had two daughters, including:[7]

  • Catherine Livingston Hooker (1817–1867),[8] who married Col. John William Hamersley (1808–1889).[9][10][11]

He died in 1858 in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York.[2]

Descendants[edit]

Through his daughter Catherine, he was the grandfather of James Hooker Hamersley (1844–1901),[12] Helen Reade Hamersley (1849–1911), who married Charles Dickinson Stickney (1858–1916), and Catherine Livingston Hamersley (1850–1873), who married John Henry Livingston (1848–1927).[9][13][14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stiles, M.D., Henry R. (1859). The History of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut, Including East Windsor, South Windsor, and Ellington PRIOR TO 1768 The Date of Their Separation From the Old Town. Heritage Books. p. 667. ISBN 9780788443855. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  2. ^ a b The Yale Literary Magazine, vol. 25, no. 1. Herrick & Noyes. 1859. p. 44. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  3. ^ Dexter, Franklin Bowditch (1912). Biographical Sketches of the Graduates of Yale College: With Annals of the College History. Holt. Retrieved 20 February 2018. james hooker 1792 1858.
  4. ^ Hough, Franklin Benjamin (1858). The New York Civil List: Containing the names and origin of the civil divisions, and the names and dates of election or appointment of the principal state and county officers from the Revolution to the present time. Weed, Parsons and Co. p. 42. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  5. ^ "DEATH OF MRS. HELEN S. HOOKER". The New York Times. February 1, 1879. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  6. ^ "A FAMOUS LADY.; DEATH OF MRS. SARAH HELEN HOOKER-- A REPRESENTATIVE OF COLONIAL DAYS-- HOW AN INFANT HAS FALLEN HEIR TO A VAST ESTATE". The New York Times. February 2, 1879. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  7. ^ Livingston, Edwin Brockholst (1910). The Livingstons of Livingston Manor: Being the History of that Branch of the Scottish House of Callendar which Settled in the English Province of New York During the Reign of Charles the Second; and Also Including an Account of Robert Livingston of Albany, "The Nephew," a Settler in the Same Province and His Principal Descendants. Knickerbocker Press. Retrieved 10 August 2017.
  8. ^ "CATHARINE LIVINGSTON HOOKER". The New York Times. 21 February 1867. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  9. ^ a b Hall, Henry (1895), America’s Successful Men of Affairs: The City of New York, 1, The New York Tribune, pp. 293–4
  10. ^ "The seven voices by Hamersley, J. Hooker (James Hooker), 1844-1901". Internet Archive. Retrieved 19 August 2015.
  11. ^ "John W. Hamersley". The New York Times. 8 June 1889. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  12. ^ "Died" (PDF), The New York Times, 19 September 1901
  13. ^ "The Hamersley Estate". The New York Times. 22 August 1889. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  14. ^ "The Hamersley Will Sustained". The New York Times. 10 July 1889. Retrieved 20 February 2018.

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