James Jones (baseball)

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James Jones
James Jones Mariners MMP July 2014.jpg
Jones with the Mariners (2014)
Seattle Mariners – No. 99
Center fielder
Born: (1988-09-24) September 24, 1988 (age 26)
Brooklyn, New York
Bats: Left Throws: Left
MLB debut
April 18, 2014 for the Seattle Mariners
Career statistics
(through June 20, 2015)
Batting average .248
Hits 78
Home runs 0
Runs batted in 9
Stolen bases 28
Runs 46
Teams

James Steven Jones (born (1988-09-24)September 24, 1988) is an American professional baseball center fielder for the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball. He was drafted in the fourth round of the 2009 Major League Baseball Draft.[1] He has been compared to outfielder Adam Jones.[2]

Early life[edit]

Jones attended the High School of Telecommunications, where he led them to a Brooklyn West Division Championship. He spent time as both a pitcher and a position player.[3]

In 2007, Jones began attending Long Island University where in his freshman season he played 50 games, including pitching in 12 of those games. For the season he hit .299 with 10 doubles, three triples, four home runs and 32 RBIs. He also had eight stolen bases.[3] He was primarily used as a pitcher and went 2−6 with a 7.25 ERA in 12 games, eight starts.

He started all 67 games in 2008, including 14 pitching appearances. Jones hit .309 with eight doubles, two triples, five home runs and 28 RBIs. His 41 runs and 19 stolen bases were team highs. He earned many honors including First Team All-Northeast Conference, he was named NEC Player of the Week on March 24, he was ranked 30th on Baseball America's Top 100 College Prospects List and was named top prospect in New York State by Perfect Game Crosschecker.[3]

Going into his junior year many felt Jones was better suited as a pitcher entering the draft.[4] His fastball was said to be up to 95 mph (153 km/h).[4] Jones continued to play as a pitcher and an outfielder throughout the rest of his junior season.[4] He was drafted by the Mariners at the end of the season as an outfielder rather than a pitcher.[1][4]

Professional career[edit]

Jones began his professional career in 2009 with the Short-Season Everett AquaSox of the Northwest League. He played 33 games in right field, seven at first base, three at designated hitter and one in left field. Jones finished the season hitting .311 with 12 doubles, two triples, three home runs and 24 RBIs. In 2010, Baseball America listed Jones as the "Best Outfield Arm" in the Seattle Mariners organization.[5] To begin the 2010 season, Jones was assigned to the Class-A Clinton LumberKings. On the season, Jones batted .269 with 87 runs scored, 132 hits, 24 doubles, 10 triples, 12 home runs, 64 RBIs, and 24 stolen bases.

Jones was added to the 40-man roster on November 20, 2013.[6] He was called up to the Mariners on April 16, 2014 and had his MLB debut on April 18, 2014 against the Miami Marlins. In his first at bat he beat out a ground ball to the second baseman. Following the game he was optioned back to Triple-A Tacoma. On May 5, 2014 he was recalled to the Mariners. On May 6, 2014 he recorded his second MLB hit in the first inning against the Oakland Athletics.

On May 18, 2014, Jones joined Edgar Martinez as the only players in Mariners history to hit safely in each of their first ten MLB starts.[7] In the next game on May 20, 2014, he got a hit to set the team record for starts with a hit to begin a career. He registered a hit in each of his first 13 MLB starts.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ian Begly (June 10, 2009). "Seattle Mariners select Long Island University's James Jones in fourth round of MLB draft". New York Daily News (nydailynews.com). Retrieved December 2, 2009. 
  2. ^ Larry Stone (June 11, 2009). "Mariners ecstatic to draft pitcher turned outfielder". The Seattle Times (seattletimes.nwsource.com). Retrieved December 2, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c "2009 Baseball Roster". Long Island University. liuathletics.com. 2009. Retrieved December 7, 2009. 
  4. ^ a b c d Aaron Fitt (February 10, 2009). "Long Island's Jones goes from baseball unknown to top major league prospect". Baseball America. espn.com. Retrieved December 2, 2009. 
  5. ^ Matt Eddy (January 22, 2010). "Seattle Mariners: Top Ten Prospects". Baseball America. baseballamerica.com. Retrieved January 21, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Mariners add four to 40-man roster before deadline". Mlb.mlb.com. November 20, 2013. Retrieved December 14, 2013. 
  7. ^ "High-energy Jones catching on fast in Seattle". Mlb.mlb.com. May 19, 2014. Retrieved May 19, 2014. 

External links[edit]