James Paty the Younger

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James Paty the Younger
Born 1718
Died 1779
Nationality British
Occupation Architect

James Paty the Younger (1718–1779) was an English mason, builder and architect. He was a member of the Paty family which was prominent in the building of 18th century Bristol. He was the partner of his brother Thomas Paty in some of his building developments. He is also thought to have been the site architect during the rebuilding of Stoke Park House at Stoke Gifford.[1]

Paty family[edit]

James was the younger brother of Thomas Paty. He was not the son, but probably the nephew or some other relation of James Paty the Elder.[2] A link between them is provided by the existence of a copybook, which may have been passed down within the family. Drawings within it have been tentatively attributed to each of these three men. However, they each operated out of different workshops, that of the younger James being in Horse Street. In 1755 he was admitted as a burgess of Bristol, by right of marriage to his wife Mary. He died in 1779 leaving a son, John.[3]

Works[edit]

James was a partner or collaborator with Thomas in building developments around Park Street and Clifton.[1]

He was the principal mason and probably site architect at Stoke Park House. He was working there to the design of Thomas Wright, but may also have contributed some design of his own.[4][5] Thomas Paty was also involved there as a mason.[1]

The role of architect at the Theatre Royal has been attributed to him by some commentators.[6] However, this is doubtful and is more commonly credited to Thomas Paty.[7][8][9]

List of works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Priest, Gordon (2003). The Paty Family, Makers of Eighteenth century Bristol. Bristol: Redcliffe Press. pp. 32–34. ISBN 1-900178-54-0. 
  2. ^ Priest, Gordon (2003). The Paty Family, Makers of Eighteenth century Bristol. Bristol: Redcliffe Press. pp. 7–10. ISBN 1-900178-54-0. 
  3. ^ Priest, Gordon (2003). The Paty Family, Makers of Eighteenth century Bristol. Bristol: Redcliffe Press. pp. 12–15. ISBN 1-900178-54-0. 
  4. ^ a b "Dower House, Stoke Gifford". Images of England. Retrieved 2010-08-30. 
  5. ^ Verey, David; Brooks, Alan (2002). Pevsner Architectural Guide, Gloucestershire 2: The Vale and The Forest of Dean. New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 694–695. ISBN 0-300-09733-6. 
  6. ^ "The Theatre Royal, King Street". Images of England. Archived from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2010-08-30. 
  7. ^ Priest, Gordon (2003). The Paty Family, Makers of Eighteenth century Bristol. Bristol: Redcliffe Press. p. 67. ISBN 1-900178-54-0. 
  8. ^ Mowl, Timothy (1991). To Build the Second City: Architects and craftsmen of Georgian Bristol. Bristol: Redcliffe Press. p. 94. ISBN 1-872971-26-1. 
  9. ^ Foyle, Andrew (2004). Pevsner Architectural Guide, Bristol. New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 158–159. ISBN 0-300-10442-1. 
  10. ^ "Parish Church of St James the Elder". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
  11. ^ "Church of St Philip and St Jacob". National Heritage List for England. Historic England. Retrieved 5 March 2016.