Jim Sladky

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Jim Sladky
Personal information
Full nameJames Sladky
Country representedUnited States
Born(1947-03-16)March 16, 1947
Bridgeport, Connecticut
DiedNovember 9, 2017(2017-11-09) (aged 70)
PartnerJudy Schwomeyer
CoachRon Ludington
Skating clubGenesee FSC

James "Jim" Sladky (March 16, 1947 – November 9, 2017) was an American competitive ice dancer.[1] With his skating partner, Judy Schwomeyer, he became a four-time World medalist (silver in 1970; bronze in 1969, 1971, 1972) and five-time U.S. national champion (1968–1972).

Personal life[edit]

James[2] Sladky was born on March 16, 1947. He was married to Judy Schwomeyer from 1971 to 1990.[3][4] He later married Fay Kelley. He worked as a hotel engineer in Hartford, Connecticut.[4]

Career[edit]

Schwomeyer/Sladky won five national titles, from 1968 to 1972.[5] They finished on the podium at four World Championships, winning silver in 1970 and bronze in 1969, 1971, and 1972).[6]

They were coached by Ron Ludington.[7] Together with Ludington, Schwomeyer/Sladky created the Yankee Polka compulsory dance.[8] They first performed it as a competitive program in 1969. Following their retirement from competitive skating, the duo skated professionally.

They were inducted into the United States Figure Skating Hall of Fame in 1991.

Results[edit]

(with Judy Schwomeyer)

International
Event 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972
World Championships 8th 4th 3rd 2nd 3rd 3rd
North American Champ. 3rd 2nd 1st
National
U.S. Championships 6th 3rd 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Remembering the Famous Ice Dancer Jim Sladky". Figure Skating Dreams. 2017-11-10. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  2. ^ Hewins, Jack (January 30, 1969). "Kauffmans Trail in Pairs Skating". Associated Press. The Daily Telegram (Eau Claire, Wisconsin). p. 15.
  3. ^ Woods, David (February 18, 2014). "Olympic ice dancing traces roots to Indianapolis native Judy Sladky". The Indianapolis Star.
  4. ^ a b Elliott, Helene (January 7, 2002). "In Long Run, Little Things Remain". L.A. Times.
  5. ^ "Past U.S. Champions - Senior" (PDF). Archived from the original on February 9, 2012.CS1 maint: unfit url (link)
  6. ^ "World Figure Skating Championships: Ice Dance" (PDF). International Skating Union. Archived from the original on February 16, 2012.CS1 maint: unfit url (link)
  7. ^ "Judy Schwomeyer And Sladky Hold Ice Dancing Lead". The New York Times. January 15, 1972.
  8. ^ "ISU Four Continents Figure Skating Championships, Day 1". International Skating Union. February 13, 2008. Archived from the original on February 14, 2012.CS1 maint: unfit url (link)