James Teit

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Portrait of James Teit

James Alexander Teit (15 April 1864 — 30 October 1922)[1] was an anthropologist, photographer and guide who worked with Franz Boas to study Interior Salish First Nations peoples in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He led expeditions throughout BC and made many contributions towards native ethnology.[2] He also worked with Edward Sapir of the Geological Survey of Canada in 1911.

Teit was born in Lerwick Scotland's Shetland Islands[3] but immigrated to Canada and married a Nlaka'pamux woman named Susanna Lucy Antko. It was through his wife that he became knowledgeable of the culture and language of the Nlaka'pamux people. In 1899 James Teit lost his wife Lucy to pneumonia. After his wife's death Teit moved to the small town of Spences Bridge, British Columbia. While living in Spences Bridge he married a lady named Josephine Morens. Together they had six children: Erik 1905, Inga 1907, Magnus 1909, Rolf 1912, Sigurd 1915, and Thorald 1919. They also had a stillborn they named Teit. Inga and Erik are buried in the Morens family graveyard with their baby brother. James and Josephine are buried in Merritt B.C.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Anglo-American Name Authority File, s.v. “Teit, James Alexander”, LC Control Number n 50008218. Accessed 31 July 2008.
  2. ^ "Gold Rush Trail, Then and Now : James Teit". Retrieved 24 May 2016.
  3. ^ "Biography – Teit, James Alexander (until 1884 he spelled his surname Tait)". Dictionary of Canadian Biography -Volume XV (1921-1930). 2005. Retrieved 2016-05-24.
  4. ^ Canadian Museum of Civilization. James Alexander Teit. Accessed 31 July 2008.

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