Jamie Johnson (TV series)

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Jamie Johnson
DVD cover for series 1 of Jamie Johnson
DVD cover for series 1 of Jamie Johnson
GenreSports, Association football
Created byDan Freedman
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons4
No. of episodes37
Production
Executive producer(s)Sam Talbot
Release

Jamie Johnson is a British drama television show based on association football originally broadcast on CBBC in 2016.[1] The series follows the self-titled character (Louis Dunn)[1] at fictitious Kingsmount Community School (filmed in Nottingham),[2] and features cameos by famous players, such as Gary Linekar, John Stones and Steven Gerrard.

The series is based on a series of books created by Dan Freedman; in particular, the book Born to Play, published in July 2016, was specifically written as a prequel to the series.

Plot[edit]

Jamie Johnson (Louis Dunn) is a teenage boy living with single mother (Emma Stansfield) and grandfather obsessed with association football, and fan of Hawkstone United., with rival team Foxborough United. Joining the school team, Johnson befriends female player Jack Marshall (Lenna Gunning Williams) and mascot Hugo "Boggy" Bogson. During the first season of the series, Johnson is dropped from the team, after failing to control his anger, when he finds that his father has a secret second family. Winning his place back on the team, Johnson also wins a chance to take penalties against the Hawkstone F.C goalkeeper, where he scores an overhead kick.

With his overhead kick becoming a viral video, Johnson begins to act like a celebrity, but almost costs his team their place in the regional tournament. Rival player in his team Dillon Simmonds (Patrick Ward) gains a place in the Hawkstone Academy at the expense of Johnson. The team win the regional cup, defeating their neighbor team in the final.

In series 3 the two schools merge into one, and rival players are forced to meet in the same school. However, after exiting the cup in the first round, the school team is disbanded, forcing Marshall along with the other players to create their own club, Pheonix F.C. Johnson successfully gains a place in the academy, but for Foxborough, and leaves the academy due to not being able to play for other clubs, with Simmonds being dropped from his academy for his attitude. Due to having Johnson in the team, the team gain the sponsorship of "Tenjin", who spend money on the club, being used as the academy for a Non-league club.

Series 4 follows Pheonix as the team played in an international tournament at the Gothia Cup. The team successfully reached the semi-final, but lost after Johnson purposefully missed a penalty, after feeling it was not deserved. This saved the club from administration, and called for Johnson to get called up to the first team for the following season.

Production[edit]

The series was originally broadcast on CBBC in 2016 and featured cameos by football personalities such as Gary Lineker, John Stones and Steven Gerrard.[1][3] The series was filmed in Nottingham over three months.[2] Cast members were hired for places on the team from both acting schools and local schools.[2][4] Many episodes of the series feature cameos from current and former players specifically for the show, due to the show being produced by the BBC.[5]

During the fourth series, the team competed in the Gothia Cup.[6] Matches filmed for the show were mostly real contests, with the actors from the show competing in the tournament and reaching the event's quarter-final, winning six matches with one loss.[7][8][9] The team arrived in Sweden having never played a competitive game before, and having previously never met some of the cast.[5][8][9]

Conception[edit]

The show is based on a series of books created by Dan Freedman about a schoolchild footballer experiencing family issues and playing for the school team.[10] In July 2016 the book Born to Play was published as a prequel to the series, establishing the title character, Jamie Johnson, and his estranged parents.[10][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gorman, Rachel. "New CBBC drama Jamie Johnson premieres in Nottingham". nottinghampost. Archived from the original on 30 January 2018. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  2. ^ a b c "Jermaine Johnson – Jamie Johnson FC on CBBC – Fulham Boys School". fulhamboysschool.org. Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  3. ^ "Second Episode of CBBC's show 'Jamie Johnson' airs tonight, featuring Notts County and Meadow Lane". nottscountyfc.co.uk. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Jermaine Johnson – Jamie Johnson FC on CBBC – Fulham Boys School". fulhamboysschool.org. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Jamie Johnson Returns". Fabuk Magazine. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  6. ^ "Abingdon Prep boys represented at the Gothia World Youth Cup | Abingdon Prep | Leading Oxfordshire preparatory school". abingdon.org.uk. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  7. ^ "THE FOURTH SERIES OF FOOTBALL DRAMA 'JAMIE JOHNSON' RETURNS WITH STAR-STUDDED CAMEOS". Brit Flix. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  8. ^ a b "The Real Gothia Cup". 4:13. 27 June 2019. BBC. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  9. ^ a b "Popular tv show recorded during Gothia Cup - Gothia Cup". Gothia Cup. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  10. ^ a b "See the first glimpse of the new CBBC series…. | Dan Freedman". danfreedman.co.uk. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  11. ^ "Jamie Johnson Books | Dan Freedman". danfreedman.co.uk. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)

External links[edit]