Jamie Rappaport Clark

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Jamie Rappaport Clark
Jamie Rappaport Clark.jpg
Clark in 2013
Born1957/1958 (age 61–62)[1]
New York City, New York, U.S.[1]
EducationTowson State University (B.S. 1979)
University of Maryland (M.S.)
OccupationPresident and CEO of Defenders of Wildlife
Known forDirector of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (1997–2001)
Spouse(s)Jim Clark

Jamie Rappaport Clark (born 1957 or 1958 in New York City)[1] is president and CEO of Defenders of Wildlife.[2] She joined the organization as executive vice president in 2004.[3]

Early life[edit]

Born in New York city, Clark attended Towson State University, earning a B.S. in wildlife biology in 1979. She received an M.S. in wildlife ecology from the University of Maryland, College Park.[2][4]

Career history[edit]

Clark has been a lifelong participant in the conservation of wildlife. As a college student, she spent a summer at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, where she released peregrine falcons back into the wild as part of a national recovery effort. Twenty years later, as the director of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, she officially removed them from the federal list of endangered species due to the successful recovery efforts,[5] in which she participated.[6]

Clark has a long career in conservation, both inside the government, mostly with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and with non-profit conservation organizations.[4][7]

In recognition of her expertise and achievements in endangered species conservation, President Bill Clinton appointed her as Director of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (the Service) in 1997, a post which she held until 2001.[8][9] During her tenure as director, Clark established 27 new refuges and added two million acres to the National Wildlife Refuge System.[10] While director, the Service worked with Congress to pass the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvements Act of 1997,[11] establishing wildlife conservation as the main purpose of all refuges.[12] The Service was involved in many successful efforts to recover imperiled wildlife during her tenure, including the bald eagle,[13] gray wolf[14] and the Aleutian Canada goose.[15]

As president and CEO of Defenders of Wildlife, Clark has been a at the forefront of endangered species and habitat conservation in the non-profit community.[16][17] She has been frequently called on to testify on Capitol Hill, providing guidance to members of Congress on conservation issues.[18] Under her tenure, Defenders has played a key role in the reintroduction of bison to tribal reservations,[19][20] secured protections for right whales,[21][22] sea turtles and piping plovers[23] and many other species and habitats.[24]

Honors and awards[edit]

In 2017 she was awarded the Rachel Carson Award by the Audubon Society for her life's work.[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bernhardt, Gordon J. (December 2012). "Profiles in Success: Inspiration from Executive Leaders in the Washington, D.C. Area – Jamie Rappaport Clark" (PDF). Bernhardt Wealth Management. confirmed by the Senate in July of 1997, making history at the age of thirty-nine as the youngest person to serve as director
  2. ^ a b "Defenders of Wildlife Announces New President". Defenders of Wildlife. Defenders. October 6, 2011. Retrieved December 7, 2014.
  3. ^ "Jamie Rappaport Clark Joins Defenders of Wildlife as New Executive VP". Defenders of Wildlife. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  4. ^ a b "USFWS/NCTC – History and Heritage: Jamie Rappaport Clark". training.fws.gov. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  5. ^ "Species Profile for American Peregrine Falcon". US Fish and Wildlife Service. November 10, 2015. Retrieved November 12, 2015.
  6. ^ "News Release | The Peregrine Fund". www.peregrinefund.org. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  7. ^ "Jamie Rappaport Clark". Defenders of Wildlife. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  8. ^ "Press Release – Jamie Clark Confirmed Director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service" (PDF). US Fish and Wildlife Service. US Fish and Wildlife Service. August 1, 1997. Retrieved November 12, 2015.
  9. ^ "Interior Secretary Applauds Choice of Jamie Rappaport Clark". www.fws.gov. Archived from the original on June 13, 2007. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  10. ^ "National Wildlife Refuge System". www.fws.gov. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  11. ^ "PUBLIC LAW 105–57—OCT. 9, 1997" (PDF). US Fish and Wildlife Service. October 9, 1997. Retrieved November 12, 2015.
  12. ^ "Legislative Mandates – Refuge Improvement Act, National Wildlife Refuge System". www.fws.gov. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  13. ^ "Bald Eagle Recovery". www.fws.gov. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  14. ^ "Species Profile for Gray wolf (Canis lupus)". US Fish and Wildlife Service. Retrieved November 12, 2015.
  15. ^ "Endangered Species Program | ESA Success Story". www.fws.gov. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  16. ^ "Jamie Rappaport Clark | Endangered Species Coalition". www.endangered.org. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  17. ^ Grant, Miles (January 26, 2015). "Conservation Groups, Native Organizations Celebrate Wilderness Recommendation for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge – National Wildlife Federation". National Wildlife Federation. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  18. ^ "Jamie Rappaport Clark | C-SPAN.org". www.c-span.org. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  19. ^ "Wild Bison Brought to Fort Peck". Defenders of Wildlife. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  20. ^ Panzar, Javier (November 17, 2014). "After quarantine, bison find a new home on the range in Montana". Newspaper. LA Times. Retrieved November 12, 2014.[permanent dead link]
  21. ^ "Feds Agree to Protect More Critical Habitat for Right Whales". Defenders of Wildlife. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  22. ^ Waymer, Jim (November 24, 2014). "Feds to expand right whale protected areas". Newspaper. Florida Today. Retrieved November 12, 2015.
  23. ^ "Cape Hatteras Protections Upheld". Defenders of Wildlife. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  24. ^ "Success Stories". Defenders of Wildlife. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  25. ^ "The Rachel Carson Award Honorees". Audubon Society. Retrieved November 17, 2018.

Works[edit]

External links[edit]