Jan Albert van Eijken

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Jan Albert van Eijken (Amersfoort, April 29, 1823 - Elberfeld, September 24, 1868) was a Dutch composer and organist. He studied with his father, the town organist and then at the Leipzig Conservatorium in 1845-46.[1] His younger brother was the better known Gerrit Jan van Eijken who later lived in London.[2] Eijken's 1853 book of organ chorales was one of the first Dutch organ books to include introductions to psalms.[3]

Works, editions and recordings[edit]

  • Songs of Love and Death - Jan Albert van Eijken: Lieder op. 30 Nr. 2, 4;Lied op. 28, 2; Lieder op. 12 Nr. 3, 4,6; op 33 Nr. 3 & 4. with Gerrit Jan van Eijken Töne der Liebe aus dem hohen Lied op. 10; Gedichte op.8 Nr. 1 & 2; op. 11; Lieder op.6 2 & 3. Performed by Anne Grimm, Marcel Reijans, Geert Smits, Frans van Ruth. NM Classics, 1997.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cyclopedia of Music and Musicians: Easter-Mystéres ed. John Denison Champlin, William Foster Apthorp - 1899 "EYKEN (Eijken), JAN ALBERT VAN, born at Amersfoort, Netherlands, April 29, 1823, died at Elberfeld, Sept. 24, 1868. Organist, pupil of his father, Gerard van Eyken, organist ; subsequently at the Leipsic Conservatorium in 1845-46."
  2. ^ Jolande van der Klis The essential guide to Dutch music: 100 composers and their work Amsterdam University Press 2000 p.117 "Gerrit Jan van Eijken AMERSFOORT, 5 MAY 1832 - LONDON, 22 MARCH 1879 Gerrit Jan van Eijken was not the only member of his family to pursue a career in music. His father Gerrit was organist and bell-ringer at the Great Church in Amersfoort ..."
  3. ^ The Princeton Seminary bulletin: Princeton Theological Seminary - 2003 "These modest introductions eventually led to larger scale organ works published apart from the koraalboeken. Jan Albert van Eijken (1823-1868) composed a koraalboek in 1853 that exemplifies well the progression toward the inclusion of modest psalm introductions.11 In his psalm settings van Eijken continues to include interludes,"

External links[edit]