Jan Kalvoda

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Jan Kalvoda
Jan Kalvoda 1996.jpg
Kalvoda in 1996
Minister of Justice
In office
4 July 1996 – 7 January 1997
Prime Minister Václav Klaus
Preceded by Jiří Novák
Succeeded by Vlasta Parkanová
Leader of the Civic Democratic Alliance
In office
28 March 1992 – 22 March 1997
Preceded by Pavel Bratinka
Succeeded by Michael Žantovský
Member of Parliament for Prague
In office
6 February 1990 – 17 December 1996
Personal details
Born (1953-10-30) 30 October 1953 (age 63)
Prague
Nationality Czech
Political party Civic Democratic Alliance (Until 1996)

Jan Kalvoda (born 30 October 1953) is a Czech lawyer and politician. He led the Civic Democratic Alliance and served as deputy prime minister and justice minister in the 1990s.

Early life[edit]

Kalvoda was born in 1953.[1]

Career[edit]

Kalvoda is a lawyer by training.[2] He was the chairman of the Civic Democratic Alliance (ODA) from 1992 to 1996.[3][4] He resigned from office 17 December 1996, and Michal Žantovský became the ODA leader.[5][6]

He served as deputy prime minister in the cabinet led by Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus from 2 July 1992 to 7 January 1997.[7][8] He was in charge of the civil service and legislation.[9] He was also justice minister in the cabinet from 1992 to 1996.[2] He resigned from all of his posts in addition to his seat at the parliament on 16 December 1996.[6] The reason for his resignation was that he lied about holding a PhD in law.[6][10] Kalvoda admitted it.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brokl, Lubomir; Zdenka Mansfeldová (December 1994). "Czech Republic". European Journal of Political Research. 26 (3-4). doi:10.1111/j.1475-6765.1994.tb00446.x. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Czech Election Turmoil: What Caused This Mess?". Wikileaks. 9 September 2009. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  3. ^ "Klaus praises Czechoslovakia's split 20 years ago". Prague Daily Monitor. Prague. 20 August 2012. Archived from the original on 26 August 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  4. ^ "Deputy Prime Minister on Territorial Division". Data Synthesis. Archived from the original on 26 August 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  5. ^ Rick Fawn (2000). The Czech Republic: A Nation of Velvet. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic. p. 68. Retrieved 1 September 2013.   – via Questia (subscription required)
  6. ^ a b c d Ian Jeffries (2001). Eastern Europe at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century: A Guide to the Economies in Transition. London: Routledge. p. 161. Retrieved 1 September 2013.   – via Questia (subscription required)
  7. ^ Jiri Pehe. "Czech Parties' Views of the EU and NATO". OMRI. Archived from the original on 27 October 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  8. ^ "Czech ministries". Rulers. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  9. ^ Vesselin Dimitrov; Klaus H. Goetz; Hellmut Wollmann (2006). Governing After Communism: Institutions and Policymaking. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 131. ISBN 978-0-7425-4009-5. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  10. ^ Raymond Whitaker (22 December 1996). "Flat Earth". The Independent. London. p. 11. Retrieved 1 September 2013.   – via Questia (subscription required)