Jan Michalski Prize

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Jan Michalski Prize for Literature (French: Prix Jan Michalski) is a Swiss literary prize for any work of fiction or non-fiction published anywhere in the world in any language.[1][2] It is meant to recognize authors from around the world and world literature in general. The jury is multicultural and multilingual in composition.

The award was launched October 2009[1] and the first winner was announced November 2010. The winner receives CHF 50,000. The authors of finalists are invited for a three-month period of residence in the Maison de l'écriture.[3]

The prize was created by the Jan Michalski Foundation for Writing and Literature (Fondation Jan Michalski pour l’Ecriture et la Littérature), founded in 2004 at the initiative of Vera Michalski-Hoffmann in memory of her husband Jan Michalski.[4] It is located in Montricher, Switzerland.[5]

Winners and shortlist[edit]

Blue Ribbon (Blue ribbon) = winner

2010

Finalists:[6][7]

Other nominated works:

2011

Finalists:[8]

Other nominated works:

2012

Finalists:[9][10]

Other nominated works:

2013

Finalists:[11][12]

Other nominated works:

2014

Finalists:[14]

Other nominated works:

2015[16]

Finalists:

  • Navid Kermani, Between Quran and Kafka: West-Eastern Inquiries
  • Blue ribbon Mark Thompson, Birth Certificate: The Story of Danilo Kiš
  • Najem Wali, Bagdad Marlboro: Ein Roman für Bradley Manning

Second selection:

2016[17]

Finalists:

Second selection:

2017[18][19]

Finalists:

Second selection:

2018[20]

Finalists:

Second selection:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Prize for Literature, Press Release of launch" (PDF). Foundation Jan Michalski. November 2009. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  2. ^ "Jan Michalski Prize for Literature". BookTrade.info. June 5, 2010. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  3. ^ "Maison de l'Ecriture". Foundation Jan Michalski. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  4. ^ "Jan Michalski Foundation, background". Foundation Jan Michalski. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  5. ^ Domhnall O'Sullivan (August 26, 2017). "Treehouses of language: inside a Swiss literature foundation". swissinfo.ch. Retrieved August 27, 2017.
  6. ^ "Le bosniaque Aleksandar Hemon reçoit le 1er prix Jan-Michalski". LivresHebdo (in French). 18 November 2010. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  7. ^ "The Jan Michalski Prize for Literature 2010". Foundation Jan Michalski. November 2010. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  8. ^ "The Jan Michalski Prize for Literature 2011". Foundation Jan Michalski. November 2011. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  9. ^ "Le Prix Jan Michalski 2012 attribué à Julia Lovell". Le Temps (in French). November 22, 2012. Retrieved November 23, 2012.[permanent dead link]
  10. ^ "The Jan Michalski Prize for Literature 2012". Foundation Jan Michalski. November 2012. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  11. ^ "Edition 2013". Jan Michalski Foundation. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  12. ^ M.A.O. (September 14, 2013). "Jan Michalski Prize shortlist". complete review. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  13. ^ Sal Robinson (November 14, 2013). "Mahmoud Dowlatabadi wins the 2013 Jan Michalski Prize". Melville House Publishing. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  14. ^ "Edition 2014". Jan Michalski Foundation. Retrieved November 29, 2014.
  15. ^ Joëlle Brack (November 28, 2014). "Prix Jan Michalski 2014". Payot Libraire. Retrieved November 29, 2014.
  16. ^ "2015 Edition". Jan Michalski Prize for Literature. Retrieved November 27, 2015.
  17. ^ "2016 Edition". Jan Michalski Prize for Literature. Retrieved August 4, 2016.
  18. ^ "2017 Edition". Jan Michalski Prize for Literature. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
  19. ^ "Press release Jan Michalski Prize 2017". Jan Michalski Prize for Literature. November 22, 2017. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  20. ^ "2018 Edition". Jan Michalski Prize for Literature. Retrieved 22 November 2018.

External links[edit]