Jan Terlouw

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Jan Terlouw
Jan Terlouw (2014).jpg
Jan Terlouw in 2014
Member of the Senate
In office
8 June 1999 – 10 June 2003
Parliamentary groupDemocrats 66
Queen's Commissioner of Gelderland
In office
1 November 1991 – 1 December 1996
MonarchBeatrix
Preceded byAd Oele (Ad interim)
Succeeded byJan Kamminga
Deputy Prime Minister
In office
11 September 1981 – 4 November 1982
Serving with Joop den Uyl (1982)
Prime MinisterDries van Agt
Preceded byHans Wiegel
Succeeded byGijs van Aardenne
Minister of Economic Affairs
In office
11 September 1981 – 4 November 1982
Prime MinisterDries van Agt
Preceded byGijs van Aardenne
Succeeded byGijs van Aardenne
Leader of the Democrats 66
In office
1 September 1973 – 8 September 1982
Deputy
Preceded byHans van Mierlo
Succeeded byLaurens Jan Brinkhorst
Parliamentary leader in the
House of Representatives
In office
1 September 1973 – 11 September 1981
Preceded byHans van Mierlo
Succeeded byLaurens Jan Brinkhorst
Parliamentary groupDemocrats 66
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
11 May 1971 – 11 September 1981
Parliamentary groupDemocrats 66
Personal details
Born
Jan Cornelis Terlouw

(1931-11-15) 15 November 1931 (age 88)
Kamperveen, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyDemocrats 66 (from 1967)
Spouse(s)
Alexandra van Hulst
(m. 1956; her death 2017)
ChildrenSanne Terlouw (born 1959)
Ashley Terlouw (born 1960)
1 other daughter and 1 son
ResidenceTwello, Netherlands
Alma materUtrecht University
(Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Mathematics, Master of Physics, Master of Mathematics, Doctor of Science)
OccupationPolitician · Diplomat · Civil servant · Nuclear physicist · Astrophysicist · Mathematician · Researcher · Nonprofit director · Political pundit · Screenwriter · Author · Professor
Military service
Allegiance Netherlands
Branch/serviceRoyal Netherlands Army
Years of service1956–1958 (Conscription)
1958–1961 (Reserve)
RankNl-landmacht-soldaat der 2e klasse.svg Private first class
Battles/warsCold War

Jan Cornelis Terlouw (born 15 November 1931) is a retired Dutch politician and diplomat of the Democrats 66 (D66) party and physicist and author.

Terlouw applied at the Utrecht University in June 1948 majoring in Physics and Mathematics and obtaining an Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Mathematics degree's in July 1952 before graduating with an Master of Physics and Master of Mathematics degree's in July 1956. Terlouw was conscripted in the Royal Netherlands Army serving as a Private first class from August 1956 until August 1958. Terlouw worked as a nuclear physics researcher at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) in Amsterdam from November 1958 until 11 May 1971. Terlouw later returned to the Utrecht University for a postgraduate education where worked as a researcher and got a doctorate as an Doctor of Science in Nuclear physics on 1 July 1964. Terlouw also worked as a researcher for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts from February 1960 until April 1962 and for the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden from August 1965 until December 1966. Terlouw served on the Municipal Council of Utrecht from April 1970 until May 1971. Terlouw was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives after the election of 1971, taking office on 11 May 1971. After the Leader of the Democrats 66 and Parliamentary leader of the Democrats 66 in the House of Representatives Hans van Mierlo announced he was stepping down as Leader and Parliamentary leader in the House of Representatives taking responsibility for the defeat in the election of 1972 and approached Terlouw as his successor, Terlouw accepted and became the Leader and Parliamentary leader on 1 September 1973. For the election of 1977 Terlouw served as Lijsttrekker (top candidate) of the Democrats 66. The Democrats 66 made a small win, gaining 2 seat and now had 8 seats in the House of Representatives. For the election of 1981 Terlouw again served as Lijsttrekker. The Democrats 66 made a large win, gaining 9 seats and now had 17 seats in the House of Representatives. The following cabinet formation of 1981 resulted in a coalition agreement between the Democrats 66, the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) and Labour Party (PvdA) which formed the Cabinet Van Agt II with Terlouw appointed as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Economic Affairs, taking office on 11 September 1981. The Cabinet Van Agt II fell just seven months into its term on 12 May 1982 and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity until it was replaced by the caretaker Cabinet Van Agt III with Terlouw continuing as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Economic Affairs, taking office on 29 May 1982. In July 1982 Terlouw announced that he wouldn't run as Lijsttrekker for the election of 1982 but that he would stand for the election of 1982. Terlouw was approached by the Chairman of the Democrats 66 Jan van Berkom to reconsider his candidacy, Terlouw initially refused but after consultation he accepted and became Lijsttrekker for the election. The Democrats 66 suffered a big loss, losing 11 seats and now had 6 seats in the House of Representatives. Terlouw took responsibility for the defeat and sequentially announced he was stepping down as Leader on 8 September 1982 and didn't take his seat in the House of Representatives. The Cabinet Van Agt III was replaced by the Cabinet Lubbers I following the cabinet formation of 1982 on 4 November 1982.

Terlouw semi-retired from active politics, in December 1982 he was nominated as Secretary-General of the International Transport Forum (ITF) in Paris, France, taking office on 30 January 1983. In October 1991 Terlouw was nominated as the next Queen's Commissioner of Gelderland, he resigned as Secretary-General the same day he was installed as Queen's Commissioner, serving from 1 November 1991 until 1 December 1996. Terlouw also became active in the public sector and occupied numerous seats as a nonprofit director on several boards of directors and supervisory boards (Energy Research Centre, GelreDome, Organisation for Applied Scientific Research, SEO Economic Research, Nikhef and the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences). Terlouw also served as a distinguished professor of Urbanization at the University of Amsterdam holding the Wibaut Chair from 1 January 1997 until 1 January 2000. Terlouw was elected as a Member of the Senate after the Senate election of 1999, taking office on 8 June 1999 serving as a frontbencher chairing several parliamentary committees. In January 2003 Terlouw announced his retirement from national politics and that he wouldn't stand for the Senate election of 2003 and continued to serve until the end of the parliamentary term on 10 June 2003.

Terlouw retired after spending 32 years in national politics but remained active in the public sector and continued to occupied numerous seats as a nonprofit director on several boards of directors and supervisory boards (Institute of International Relations Clingendael, Netherlands Atlantic Association, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Organisation for Scientific Research, Institute for Advanced Study and the Society for Statistics and Operations Research) and served on several state commissions (Nationaal Comité 4 en 5 mei) and served as an diplomat and lobbyist for several economic delegations on behalf of the government and as an advocate and activist for Conservation, Sustainable development, Animal welfare and European integration. Terlouw also served as a distinguished professor of Literature at the Tilburg University holding the Leonardo Chair from 1 September 2003 until 1 September 2004. Terlouw is also a prolific author, having written more than thirty books since 1970 about Politics, Science, Children's literature, Young adult fiction and Poetry. His 1972 World War II book Winter in Wartime was adopted as a screenplay and released as a feature film in 2008.

Terlouw is known for his abilities as a negotiator and consensus builder. Terlouw continues to comment on political affairs as of 2020 and holds the distinction as the first member of the Democrats 66 party to serve as Queen's Commissioner.

Background[edit]

Early life and education[edit]

Terlouw was born in Kamperveen, Overijssel and grew up in the Veluwe. He was the eldest son a family of five, having two younger brothers and two sisters.

After high school, Terlouw studied at Utrecht University, where he obtained an MSc degree in mathematics and physics, and a PhD degree in nuclear physics.[citation needed]

Deputy Prime Minister Jan Terlouw and Prime Minister Dries van Agt during a debate in the House of Representatives on 8 June 1982.

Career[edit]

After graduating from Utrecht University, he worked as a physics researcher in the Netherlands, the United States, and Sweden.[citation needed]

After working for thirteen years, he became a politician, joining the Dutch House of Representatives (the lower house of the Dutch legislature) as a member of the Democraten 66 political party in 1970

Personal life[edit]

Terlouw was married to Alexandra van Hulst until her death on 23 August 2017.[citation needed] Terlouw is a father of four and grandfather of twelve.[citation needed]

Publications[edit]

Terlouw wrote 24 children's books, most notably Winter in Wartime (Oorlogswinter, 1972) and How to Become King (Koning van Katoren, 1971), both of which won the Gouden Griffel and have been made into motion pictures directed by Martin Koolhoven.[1][2]

Terlouw's books have been illustrated by various illustrators, including Dick van der Maat, Martijn van der Linden and Fiel van der Veen.

Awards[edit]

  • 1972 Gouden Griffel for the novel How to Become King
  • 1973 Gouden Griffel for the novel Winter in Wartime
  • 1990 Prize of the Netherlands Children's Jury for the novel The Figure-skater
  • 2000 Prize of the Dutch Joung Jury for Eigen rechter (1988)[3]

Decorations[edit]

Honours
Ribbon bar Honour Country Date Comment
NLD Order of Orange-Nassau - Commander BAR.png Commander of the Order of Orange-Nassau Netherlands 9 December 1982

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jan Terlouw: Biography". Dutch Foundation for Literature. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  2. ^ "Jan Terlouw". WorldCat.org. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  3. ^ Eigen rechter (in Dutch). Lemniscaat. 1998. ISBN 978-9056371548.

External links[edit]

Official
Party political offices
Preceded by
Hans van Mierlo
Leader of the Democrats 66
1973–1982
Succeeded by
Laurens Jan Brinkhorst
Parliamentary leader of the
Democrats 66 in the
House of Representatives

1973–1981
Preceded by
Hans van Mierlo
1972
Lijsttrekker of the
Democrats 66

197719811982
Succeeded by
Hans van Mierlo
1986
Political offices
Preceded by
Hans Wiegel
Deputy Prime Minister
1981–1982
Served alongside: Joop den Uyl
Succeeded by
Gijs van Aardenne
Preceded by
Gijs van Aardenne
Minister of Economic Affairs
1981–1982
Preceded by
Ad Oele
Ad interim
Queen's Commissioner of
Gelderland

1991–1996
Succeeded by
Jan Kamminga
Business positions
Preceded by
Unknown
Chairman of the
Supervisory board of the
GelreDome

1996–2000
Succeeded by
Unknown
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
Gijs van Aardenne
Chairman of the
Supervisory board of the
Energy Research Centre

1995–2005
Succeeded by
Ruud Lubbers
Academic offices
Preceded by
Annemieke Roobeek
Distinguished Professor
Wibaut Chair of the
University of Amsterdam

1997–1999
Succeeded by
Geert Mak
Preceded by
Leo Vroman
Distinguished Professor
Leonardo Chair of the
Tilburg University

2003–2004
Succeeded by
Ted van Lieshout