Jane Green (author)

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Jane Green
Born (1968-05-31) May 31, 1968 (age 48)
[citation needed]
London, England, United Kingdom
Residence Westport, Connecticut, US
Other names Jane Green Warburg
Occupation Author
Years active 2000 - present
Spouse(s) first, unnamed;
second, Ian Warburg
Children 6, of whom 2
are stepchildren

Jane Green, born in 1968,[1] also known by her married name, Jane Green Warburg,[not verified in body] is an English-born American author whose works of fiction are American and international bestsellers.[1] As of 2014, Green's books had sold in excess of 10 million copies globally, with translations of them appearing in thirty-one languages,[1] making her a leading author, globally, of commercial women's fiction.[not verified in body] With regard to genres, she has been described as "[o]ne of the first of the chick lit" authors,[1][2][3] and as a founding author of the form of fiction sometimes referred to as "mum lit."[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Jane Green was born in London, England, on May 31, 1968.[citation needed][verification needed] She attended South Hampstead High School, and went on to study fine art at Aberystwyth University.[1]


Early career[edit]

Green was employed by Granada TV as a publicist in her early 20s.[1] She continued working as a journalist throughout her twenties,[when?] writing women's features for publications including The Daily Express,[1][4][better source needed] The Daily Mail, and[citation needed] Cosmopolitan magazine.[citation needed]

Fiction writing[edit]

Green left the The Daily Express in 1996, to begin work which would result seven months later in her publication of her first book, Straight Talking,[1][4] for which there was a bidding war,[1] and which became a bestseller.[citation needed] The book launched her career as "the queen of chick lit".[this quote needs a citation] Her novels include Jemima J: A Novel About Ugly Ducklings and Swans (2000),[1] Life Swap (UK; Swapping Lives in the US, 2006),[1] Second Chance (2007),[1] The Beach House (2008),[1] and Saving Grace (2015),[1] five of seventeen novels through 2016 that became New York Times bestsellers.[verification needed][citation needed] As of 2014, Green had over 10 million books in print,[1] and many global bestsellers.[citation needed] "Jane Green" is the name she would continue to use in her writing career, including after she married Ian Warburg of the Warburg banking family, her second spouse,[1] and legally took his name.[citation needed]

Other career activities[edit]

Green has taught at writers' conferences,[1] and writes for various publications including Cosmopolitan magazine,[1] The Sunday Times,[citation needed] The Daily Telegraph,[citation needed] Parade magazine,[citation needed] and The Huffington Post.[1] A graduate of the French Culinary Institute, she is publishing a cookbook, Good Taste.[full citation needed] As of this date,[when?] Green is also writing as a weekly column for The Lady magazine in the United Kingdom.[citation needed] Her contribution of an e-book on the marriages of English royals for ABC News, Green became an ABC News Radio correspondent, and covered the 2011 wedding of "Kate" Middleton to England's Prince William.[1]

Green contributed a story on the virtue of marital fidelity for The Moth Radio Hour, which was recorded in November 2015, and aired in September 2016.[5]

Personal life[edit]

As of 2014, Green lived in Westport, Connecticut,[1] with her second husband, investment adviser Ian Warburg,[1] of the Warburg banking family.[citation needed] Green has four children from her first marriage,[1] daughter Tabitha, and sons Harrison, Nathaniel, and Jasper,[citation needed] and two stepchildren,[1] children whose ages spanned from 11 to 19 in 2014.[1] The family is also home to a number of dogs, cats, and chickens.[5][full citation needed] A cancer survivor, Green works to raise awareness for malignant melanoma, Hashimoto's disease, and chronic Lyme disease.[citation needed]



  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Graham, Natalie (October 17, 2014). "Jane Green: Chick-Lit Author and Property Tycoon". Financial Times. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Thomas, Scarlett (August 4, 2002). "The great chick lit conspiracy". The Independent. Archived from the original on April 15, 2008. Retrieved 22 September 2016. 
  3. ^ This is alongside Helen Fielding, who pioneered the genre with her "Bridget Jones's Diary" column in The Independent.[when?] See Thomas, The Independent. op. cit.
  4. ^ a b Barnes & Noble Staff (December 16, 2008). "Meet the Writers: Jane Green". New York City: Barnes & Noble Booksellers. Archived from the original (interview and brief biography) on December 16, 2008. Retrieved 22 September 2016. [better source needed]
  5. ^ a b Green, Jane (September 13, 2016) [November 9, 2015]. The Moth Radio Hour: Greener Grass (streaming audio [duration, 14:04]). New York City: The Moth. Retrieved September 22, 2016. [full citation needed]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]