Jane Livingston

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Jane Shelton Livingston (born 12 February 1944 in Upland, California) is an American art curator.

From 1967 to 1975, Livingston was curator of 20th-century art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She was editor of the Richard Diebenkorn Catalogue Raisonné and now works as an independent curator.[1]

In 1975 she became associate director and chief curator at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, but resigned in 1989, prompted by the Corcoran's cancellation of a show of work by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe.[2][3] Livingston had been on sabbatical, writing a book under a Guggenheim Fellowship when the show was cancelled [4]; when she returned, she made it clear that she would not have cancelled the show.[5] Livingston had arranged the show which was financed in part by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).[6]

She is known for organizing a major museum exhibition of Chicano art,[7] and, together with Marcia Tucker, the first major museum exhibition of Bruce Nauman.[1] Other exhibitions include her show of National Geographic, "illustrative" photography;[8] she and curator John Beardsley, also curated an exhibition of black outsider artists in 1982.[9] This show "marked an explosion of interest in the work of African American artists."[10] Livingston curated a show of John Alexander's works at the Smithsonian in 2008.[11]

Livingston is the author and co-author of numerous books and catalogs. Her work on The Art of Richard Diebenkorn (1997) helped produce a book that collected the most important works of Richard Diebenkorn, who had been under-represented in publishing.[12]

Publications[edit]

  • Livingston, Jane (1972). Bruce Nauman: Work from 1965 to 1972. Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art. ISBN 9780875870519.
  • Livingston, Jane; Beardsley, John; Perry, Regenia (1982). Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980. Jackson: University Press of Mississippii. OCLC 564711070.
  • Livingston, Jane (1984). Ad Reinhardt. Washington, D.C.: Cocoran Gallery of Art. OCLC 563138463.
  • Livingston, Jane; Krauss, Rosalind E.; Ades, Dawn (1985). L'Amour Fou: Photography & Surrealism. New York: Abbeville Press. OCLC 560453860.
  • Livingston, Jane; Elderfield, John; Fine, Ruth (1997). The Art of Richard Diebenkorn. Los Angeles: University of California Press. ISBN 9780520212572.
  • Livingston, Jane (1992). The New York School: Photographs, 1936-1963. New York: Stewart, Tabori & Chang. ISBN 9781556702396.
  • Livingston, Jane (1994). The Art of Photography at National Geographic. Köln: Evergreen/Benedikt Taschen. ISBN 9783822893111.
  • Livingston, Jane; Nochlin, Linda; Lee, Yvette Y. (2002). The Paintings of Joan Mitchell. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. ISBN 9780520235687.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Modern Art in Los Angeles: Women Curators in Los Angeles". The Getty Research Institute. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  2. ^ Lewis, Jo Ann (December 14, 1992). "PORTRAIT OF A CURATOR: LIFE AFTER THE CORCORAN". The Washington Post. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 5, 2016.
  3. ^ Parachini, Allan. "Chief Curator at Corcoran Resigns". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  4. ^ "Chief Curator at Corcoran Resigns". L.A. Times. Retrieved 17 November 2018.
  5. ^ Lewis, Jo Ann (14 September 1998). "Corcoran Gallery's Longtime No. 2 Resigns". The Washington Post. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  6. ^ Gamarekian, Barbara (14 September 1989). "Curator for Mapplethorpe Show Resigns Corcoran Posts". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  7. ^ Kimmelman, Michael (9 June 1989). "30 Hispanic Artists at Brooklyn Museum". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  8. ^ Richard, Paul (4 June 1988). "The Magnificent 'Odyssey'; At the Corcoran, Geographic's World, Up Front & Up Close". The Washington Post. Retrieved 28 March 2016 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)).
  9. ^ Smith, Roberta (8 March 2002). "'A Return to January 1982' -- The Corcoran Show Revisited". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  10. ^ Amaki, Amalia K. (2006). "The Power of Color in the Art World". The Crisis. Retrieved 28 March 2016 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)).
  11. ^ Breal, Jordan (May 2008). "A Dark Visionary". Texas Monthly. Retrieved 28 March 2016 – via GALE. (Subscription required (help)).
  12. ^ Hurley, Patricia (June 1998). "A Neglected Master". Art Book. 5 (3): 11–12. Retrieved 28 March 2016 – via EBSCO. (Subscription required (help)).