Jansher Khan

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Jansher Khan
PP SI HI
Jansher Khan in playing days.pdf
Personal information
Native nameجان شیر خان
Nickname(s)King Khan, The Punisher
CitizenshipPakistani
Born (1969-06-15) June 15, 1969 (age 51)
Peshawar, Pakistan
Occupation
 • National Head Squash Coach to Pakistan Squash Federation
(2010–2011)

 • 1st Advisor to the President of the Pakistan Squash Federation
(2010–2012), (2015–2018)

[1]

 • Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Head Squash Coach (2020)[2]
Years active1986–2018
Height6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Spouse(s)
• Violet Sough (m.1986; div.1989)

• Naseem (m.1989)

Children
5, including Kamran Khan
Sport
Country Pakistan
SportSquash
Rank
From the Pakistan Government

1988 • Pride of Performance[3]
1993 • Sitara-i-Imtiaz[3]
1997 • Hilal-e-Imtiaz[3]

World Open
1987, 89, 90, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96
FederationPakistan Squash Federation
Turned pro1986
RetiredSeptember 2002
Achievements and titles
Highest world rankingNo. 1 (January 1988 till December 2000)
Updated on August 24, 2018.

Jansher Khan PP SI HI (Urdu: جان شیر خان‎; born 15 June 1969, in Peshawar, Pakistan)[4][5][6] is a former World No. 1 professional Pakistani squash player. During his career, he won the World Open a record eight times, and the British Open six times. Jansher Khan is widely regarded as one of the greatest squash players of all time. Ranked number 1 in the world from 1988 to 1998, Jansher Khan's retirement in 2001 brought an end to nearly 50 years of domination by Pakistan in the sport of squash. He was troubled by back, knee and groin injuries throughout his career.[7][8]

Career[edit]

Jansher Khan started his career with a fractured hand at the age of 11, in 1981. He first came to prominence at the age of 16 when he won the World Junior Squash Championships in Australia in 1986 and then the Senior World Open title in same year, by beating Australia's Chris Dittmar in the final. He became the youngest winner in the history of squash and in the same year he also defeated world No.1 Jahangir Khan in Hong Kong Open. Jansher Khan started his career as an employee of Pakistan Air Force. Jansher Khan was known for his lightning quick reflexes and movement around the court. During his illustrious career, he won PSA Professional 293 matches out of total 331 and PSA Professional Tour Finals 99 out of 118.[7] which is a record in the history of squash, while his other main competitor Jahangir Khan won PSA professional 134 matches out of total 164 and PSA Professional Tour Finals 61 out of 80. Jansher Khan officially announced his retirement from squash in 2001[9] Jansher Khan was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in late 2011. In 2020, after suffering from severe back pain while praying and walking, Jansher Khan underwent double back surgery successfully at a local hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan.[10][7]

Jansher Khan had these words of advice for young players after his successful surgery:

"I would advise today's young players that along with their hard training they must take special care of their back, knee and groin injuries and treat minor ailments timely to avoid serious problems in future."[7]

Squash Coaching[edit]

In September 2020 on request of the Chief Minister Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Mahmood Khan squash legend Jansher Khan joined the directorate general sports Khyber Pakhtunkhwa as a head squash coach the facilities available to athletes in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa are unmatched in any other country. Squash is the only sport in which coaching and training is very important. Due to lack of good training and coaching, the best talents of the province is being wasted. The government has fulfilled his desire to train the children of the province by providing coaching opportunities. Jansher Khan said that he will do his best to fill the gap created in the game of squash and make the country a new world champion.[2]

Awards and recognition[edit]

World Open final appearances[edit]

9 finals (8 titles, 1 runner-up)

Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1987 Birmingham, England Australia Chris Dittmar 9–5, 9–4, 4–9, 9–6
Runner-up 1988 Amsterdam, Netherlands Pakistan Jahangir Khan 9-6, 9-2, 9-2
Winner 1989 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Australia Chris Dittmar 7–15, 6–15, 15–4, 15–11, 15–10
Winner 1990 Toulouse, France Australia Chris Dittmar 15–8, 17–15, 13–15, 15–5
Winner 1992 Johannesburg, South Africa Australia Chris Dittmar 15–11, 15–9, 10–15, 15–6
Winner 1993 Karachi, Pakistan Pakistan Jahangir Khan 14–15, 15–9, 15–5, 15–5
Winner 1994 Barcelona, Spain England Peter Marshall 10–15, 15–11, 15–8, 15–4
Winner 1995 Nicosia, Cyprus England Del Harris 15–10, 17–14, 16–17, 15–8
Winner 1996 Karachi, Pakistan Australia Rodney Eyles 15–13, 17–15, 11–15, 15–3

Major World Series final appearances[edit]

Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1987 London, England Pakistan Jahangir Khan 9–6, 9–0, 9–5
Runner-up 1991 London, England Pakistan Jahangir Khan 2–9, 9–4, 9–4, 9–0
Winner 1992 London, England Australia Chris Robertson 9–7, 10–9, 9–5
Winner 1993 London, England Australia Chris Dittmar 9–6, 9–5, 6–9, 9–2
Winner 1994 London, England Australia Brett Martin 9–1, 9–0, 9–10, 9–1
Winner 1995 Cardiff, Wales England Peter Marshall 15–4, 15–4, 15–5
Winner 1996 Cardiff, Wales Australia Rodney Eyles 15–13, 15–8, 15–10
Winner 1997 Cardiff, Wales Scotland Peter Nicol 17–15, 9–15, 15–12, 8–15, 15–8
Runner-up 1998 Birmingham, England Scotland Peter Nicol 17–16, 15–4, 15–5
Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1987 Hong Kong Australia Chris Dittmar 9-6, 9-2, 9-5
Winner 1988 Hong Kong Australia Chris Dittmar 15-11, 9-15, 15-6, 12-15, 15-1
Winner 1989 Hong Kong Australia Chris Dittmar 15-8, 16-17, 15-2, 15-6
Winner 1990 Hong Kong Australia Chris Robertson 15-6, 14-15, 15-10, 15-5
Winner 1991 Hong Kong Australia Tristan Nancarrow 16-17, 15-6, 15-17, 15-4, 15-5
Winner 1994 Hong Kong Scotland Peter Nicol 15-7, 15-10, 15-6
Winner 1995 Hong Kong Australia Brett Martin 15-12, 15-7, 15-3
Runner-up 1996 Hong Kong Australia Rodney Eyles 15-10, 15-10, 15-5
Winner 1997 Hong Kong Canada Jonathon Power 14-15, 15-12, 15-7, 15-2
Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1987 Pakistan Pakistan Jahangir Khan 1-9, 9-1, 10-8, 9-5, 9-0
Runner-up 1988 Pakistan Pakistan Jahangir Khan 16-17, 10-15, 15-9, 15-9, 15-7
Runner-up 1989 Pakistan Pakistan Jahangir Khan 15-11, 15-12, 15-10
Winner 1990 Pakistan Pakistan Jahangir Khan 9-2, 4-9, 9-2, 9-2
Runner-up 1991 Pakistan Pakistan Jahangir Khan 9-15, 15-10, 15-10, 15-5
Winner 1992 Pakistan Pakistan Jahangir Khan 15-13, 15-5, 15-12
Winner 1994 Pakistan England Peter Marshall 14-15, 15-14, 15-10, 9-15, 15-6
Winner 1995 Pakistan Australia Rodney Eyles 15-9, 15-12, 15-8
Winner 1997 Pakistan Australia Anthony Hill 15-11, 15-7, 15-8
Outcome Year Location Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1993 Zurich, Switzerland Australia Chris Dittmar 15-10, 10-15, 15-13, 15-8
Winner 1994 Zurich, Switzerland England Peter Marshall 8-15, 15-8, 15-7, 15-9
Winner 1997 Hatfield, England Australia Brett Martin 9-7, 9-5, 9-2
Winner 1998 Hatfield, England England Simon Parke 15-12, 13-15, 15-11, 15-10
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Jahangir Khan
Chris Dittmar
World No. 1
January 1988 – January 1998
Succeeded by
Peter Nicol
David Palmer

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Squash Legend Jansher Khan".
  2. ^ a b "Jansher Khan Appointed Head Coach".
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Jansher Khan's awards for Squash listed on Pakistan Sports Board website". Pakistan Sports Board website. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  4. ^ Andrew Shelley. "Profile of Jansher Khan". Encyclopedia Britannica website. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  5. ^ "Profile of Jansher Khan". the-south-asian.com website. November 2001. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  6. ^ Raju Chainani (20 August 2004). "Jansher Khan: "The Last Emperor...a retrospective of a championship career". Squash Talk Player Profiles website. Archived from the original on 20 February 2006. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d Jansher undergoes double back surgery successfully Dawn (newspaper), Published 1 August 2020, Retrieved 8 September 2020
  8. ^ Ian Sansom (30 July 2010). "Great dynasties of the world: The Khans". The Guardian (newspaper). Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  9. ^ "2001 – a disastrous year for Pakistan squash". Dawn (newspaper). 31 December 2001. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  10. ^ "Squash great Jansher Khan diagnosed with Parkinson's disease". The Times of India. 10 October 2011. Retrieved 8 September 2020.

External links[edit]