Jansher Khan

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Jansher Khan
Full name Jansher Khan
Nickname(s) King Khan, The Punisher
Country  Pakistan
Residence Peshawar, Pakistan
Born (1969-06-15) June 15, 1969 (age 46)
Peshawar, Pakistan
Height 6'1"
Turned Pro 1986
Retired 2002
Plays Right handed
Men's singles
Highest ranking No. 1 (January, 1988, Till Dec 2000)
Title(s) 99
World Open W (1987, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996)
Last updated on: September 19, 2010.

Jansher Khan (born 15 June 1969, in Peshawar, Pakistan[1]) is a former World No. 1 professional Pakistani squash player. During his career he won the World Open a record eight times, and the British Open six times.

Family[edit]

Jansher Khan is ethnic Pashtun and he is from Nawai Kalai, Peshawar. He currently lives in Peshawar with his wife, Naseem, and their 2 Sons Ayaz Sher Khan, Ali Sher Khan, And 3 Daughters Sidra Sher Khan,Sana Sher Khan and Rabia Sher Khan being the youngest.

Rivalry with Jahangir[edit]

Jansher won the World Junior Squash Championship title in 1986 And At Same Year He Won Record The Youngest Player to Become Senior World Champion and also Became Professional that year. At the time, the men's professional tour was dominated by another great Pakistani player – Jahangir Khan. Jahangir won the pair's first few encounters in late-1986 and early-1987. Jansher then scored his first win over Jahangir in September 1987, beating him in straight games in the semi-finals of the Hong Kong Open. Jansher then went on to beat Jahangir in their next Ten consecutive encounters Years. This included a win in the semi-finals of the 1987 World Open, following which Jansher claimed his first World Open title by beating Australia's Chris Dittmar in the final.

Retirement and after squash[edit]

Jansher officially announced his retirement from squash in 2001. He won a total of 99 professional titles and was ranked the World No. 1 for over 10 years.

In August 2007, Jansher announced that he was coming out of retirement to play in a Professional Squash Association tournament in London in October 2007. He said in a news conference that the reason for his comeback was that, "I feel I am mentally and physically fit to play the international circuit for another three to four years".[2] He lost in the opening round of the event to England's Scott Handley 11–9, 6–11, 6–11 0–11.[3]

In October 2011, It was revealed that Jansher was suffering from Parkinsonism and is currently being treated in Pakistan,America,Australia,UK.[4]

World Open final appearances[edit]

Wins (8)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1987 Chris Dittmar 9–5, 9–4, 4–9, 9–6
1989 Chris Dittmar 7–15, 6–15, 15–4, 15–11, 15–10
1990 Chris Dittmar 15–8, 17–15, 13–15, 15–5
1992 Chris Dittmar 15–11, 15–9, 10–15, 15–6
1993 Jahangir Khan 14–15, 15–9, 15–5, 15–5
1994 Peter Marshall 10–15, 15–11, 15–8, 15–4
1995 Del Harris 15–10, 17–14, 16–17, 15–8
1996 Rodney Eyles 15–13, 17–15, 11–15, 15–3
1997 Rodney Eyles 15–13, 17–15, 11–15, 15–3
Runner-ups (1)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1988 Jahangir Khan 6–9, 2–9, 2–9

British Open final appearances[edit]

Wins (6)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1992 Chris Robertson 9–7, 10–9, 9–5
1993 Chris Dittmar 9–6, 9–5, 6–9, 9–2
1994 Brett Martin 9–1, 9–0, 9–10, 9–1
1995 Peter Marshall 15–4, 15–4, 15–5
1996 Rodney Eyles 15–13, 15–8, 15–10
1997 Peter Nicol 17–15, 9–15, 15–12, 8–15, 15–8
Runner-ups (3)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1987 Jahangir Khan 6–9, 0–9, 5–9
1991 Jahangir Khan 9–2, 4–9, 4–9, 0–9
1998 Peter Nicol 16–17, 4–15, 5–15

References[edit]

External links[edit]