Jansher Khan

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Jansher Khan
Full name Jansher Khan
Nickname(s) King Khan, The Punisher
Country  Pakistan
Residence Peshawar, Pakistan
Born (1969-06-15) June 15, 1969 (age 47)
Peshawar, Pakistan
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Turned Pro 1986
Retired 2002
Plays Right handed
Men's singles
Highest ranking No. 1 (January, 1988, Till Dec 2000)
Title(s) 99
World Open W (1987, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996)
Last updated on: September 19, 2010.

Jansher Khan (Urdu: جان شیر خان‎; born 15 June 1969, in Peshawar, Pakistan[1]) is a former world No. 1 professional Pakistani squash player. During his career he won the World Open a record eight times, and the British Open six times. Jansher's skill of movement singled him out from the competition, holding "all the top squash experts in awe."[2] Jansher Khan's retirement brought an end to nearly 50 years of domination by Pakistan in the sport of squash.[3]

Family[edit]

His son Kamran Khan is a Malaysian professional squash player.[4]

Career[edit]

He won the World Junior Squash Championship title in 1986 and the senior World Open title in 1987, by beating Australia's Chris Dittmar in the final.[citation needed]

Retirement and after squash[edit]

Jansher officially announced his retirement from squash in 2001. He won a total of 99 professional titles and was ranked the World No. 1 for over 10 years.

In August 2007, Jansher announced that he was coming out of retirement to play in a Professional Squash Association tournament in London in October 2007. He said in a news conference that the reason for his comeback was that, "I feel I am mentally and physically fit to play the international circuit for another three to four years".[5] He lost in the opening round of the event to England's Scott Handley 11–9, 6–11, 6–11 0–11.[6]

In October 2011, It was revealed that Jansher was suffering from Parkinson's disease.[7]

World Open final appearances[edit]

Wins (8)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1987 Chris Dittmar 9–5, 9–4, 4–9, 9–6
1989 Chris Dittmar 7–15, 6–15, 15–4, 15–11, 15–10
1990 Chris Dittmar 15–8, 17–15, 13–15, 15–5
1992 Chris Dittmar 15–11, 15–9, 10–15, 15–6
1993 Jahangir Khan 14–15, 15–9, 15–5, 15–5
1994 Peter Marshall 10–15, 15–11, 15–8, 15–4
1995 Del Harris 15–10, 17–14, 16–17, 15–8
1996 Rodney Eyles 15–13, 17–15, 11–15, 15–3
Runners-up (1)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1988 Jahangir Khan 6–9, 2–9, 2–9

British Open final appearances[edit]

[citation needed]

Wins (6)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1992 Chris Robertson 9–7, 10–9, 9–5
1993 Chris Dittmar 9–6, 9–5, 6–9, 9–2
1994 Brett Martin 9–1, 9–0, 9–10, 9–1
1995 Peter Marshall 15–4, 15–4, 15–5
1996 Rodney Eyles 15–13, 15–8, 15–10
1997 Peter Nicol 17–15, 9–15, 15–12, 8–15, 15–8
Runners-up (3)
Year Opponent in final Score in final
1987 Jahangir Khan 6–9, 0–9, 5–9
1991 Jahangir Khan 9–2, 4–9, 4–9, 0–9
1998 Peter Nicol 16–17, 4–15, 5–15

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jansher Khan". Britannica. Britannica.com. Retrieved 2 March 2010. 
  2. ^ Pearson, David. "Movement is the Key". colorado.edu. University of Colorado, Boulder. Retrieved 3 October 2015. When Jansher Khan first appeared on the world scene it was his movement, not his racket skills, that singled him out and held all the top squash experts in awe. 
  3. ^ Sansom, Ian. "Great dynasties of the world: The Khans". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 October 2015. 
  4. ^ "In search of his true self | Doha Stadium Plus". Retrieved 19 March 2016. 
  5. ^ Pakistan's Jansher to return after five-year absence, Reuters India, 30 August 2007
  6. ^ Handley gives Jansher a reality check, SquashTalk, 11 October 2007
  7. ^ "Jansher Khan diagnosed with Parkinson's disease". The Times of India. The Times Group. Retrieved 19 March 2016. 

External links[edit]