January 1929

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The following events occurred in January 1929:

January 1, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • In the 15th Rose Bowl, the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets defeated the California Golden Bears 8–7. The game featured one of the biggest blunders in college football history when Roy Riegels of the Golden Bears picked up a fumble and ran the wrong way, leading to a Yellow Jackets two-point safety that ultimately provided the margin of victory.[1]
  • German President Paul von Hindenburg and Chancellor Hermann Müller told a New Year's Day reception of diplomatic representatives that the German people wanted the occupation of the Rhineland to end. Hindenburg said that the German people were "very bitter because a great part of their country still lacks the liberty which we claim by divine and human right", while Müller said that strained international relations remaining over the war could only end once the "foreign yoke" of occupation had been removed.[2]
  • Born: Joseph Lombardo, mafioso, in Italy; Haruo Nakajima, actor, in Yamagata, Japan

January 2, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Yugoslavian Prime Minister Anton Korošec informed King Alexander of his resignation, explaining that he could not accept the demands of the Peasant-Democratic coalition which was campaigning for Croatian autonomy.[3][4]
  • Died: Denny Lyons, 62, American baseball player

January 3, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

January 4, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

January 5, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

January 6, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

January 7, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

January 8, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 9, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 10, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

January 11, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

January 12, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

January 13, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Yugoslavia banned foreign newspapers that criticized the new dictatorship.[20]
  • Died: Wyatt Earp, 80, American gambler, deputy sherriff and deputy town marshal

January 14, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

January 15, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 16, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 17, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

January 18, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

January 19, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

  • The Hawes-Cooper Act was passed in the United States, making prison-made goods subject to the laws of the state importing them. The bill was an attempt to curtail the use of prison labor that could make goods more cheaply than free market labor.[26]

January 20, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

January 21, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

January 22, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 23, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 24, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

January 25, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

January 26, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

January 27, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

January 28, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

  • Outgoing U.S. President Calvin Coolidge gave his farewell budget address before members of the business organizations of the government. Coolidge warned that the nation's prosperity would only continue if rigid economical practice was maintained.[36]
  • Born: Claes Oldenburg, American sculptor, in Stockholm, Sweden

January 29, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 30, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 31, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goldstein, Richard (December 25, 2003). "College Football; Revisiting Wrong Way Riegels". The New York Times. Retrieved March 18, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Berlin Demands its "Rightful" Full Freedom". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 2, 1929. p. 3. 
  3. ^ Dragnich, Alex N. (1983). The First Yugoslavia: Search for a Viable Political System. Leland Stanford Junior University. p. 55. ISBN 978-0-8179-7843-3. 
  4. ^ Bartlett, William (2003). Croatia: Between Europe and the Balkans. London: Routledge. p. 17. ISBN 978-1-134-47891-0. 
  5. ^ "Latin Powers Sign Protocol, Averting War". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 4, 1929. p. 1. 
  6. ^ Gomery, Douglas (2005). The Coming of Sound. Oxon and New York: Routledge. p. 119. ISBN 978-1-135-92395-2. 
  7. ^ "Andrew Mellon Pays $1,000,000 for "Madonna"". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 5, 1929. p. 1. 
  8. ^ "Noted English Art Authority Dies". Emporia Gazette. Emporia, Kansas: 8. May 25, 1939. 
  9. ^ a b Tomasevich, Jozo (2001). War and Revolution in Yugoslavia: 1941–1945. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. p. 26. ISBN 978-0-8047-7924-1. 
  10. ^ a b c "Chronology 1929". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved March 18, 2015. 
  11. ^ Steiner, John Michael (1975). Power Politics and Social Change in National Socialist Germany. The hague: Moutin & Co. p. 55. ISBN 978-90-279-7651-2. 
  12. ^ "King-Dictator of Jugo-Slavia Clamps Censorship on Press". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 8, 1929. p. 2. 
  13. ^ "Flies 6 1/4 Days, Plane Lands". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 8, 1929. pp. 1–2. 
  14. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 374. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  15. ^ Rue, Larry (January 9, 1929). "Serbia Dictator Decrees Entire New Set of Laws". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 23. 
  16. ^ "Public Meetings in Serbia Banned by New Dictator". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 10, 1929. p. 18. 
  17. ^ Assouline, Pierre (2009) [1996]. Hergé, the Man Who Created Tintin. Charles Ruas (translator). Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-539759-8. 
  18. ^ Brennan, Elizabeth A.; Clarage, Elizabeth C. (1999). Who's who of Pulitzer Prize Winners. The Oryx Press. p. 98. ISBN 978-1-57356-111-2. 
  19. ^ "Mrs. Babe Ruth Fire Victim". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 14, 1929. p. 1. 
  20. ^ Rue, Larry (January 14, 1929). "Dictator Puts Curb on Press in Jugo-Slavia". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13. 
  21. ^ a b Tucker, Spencer C. (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle East. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, LLC. pp. 1838–1839. ISBN 978-1-85109-672-5. 
  22. ^ "Year End Review – 1929". CanadaGenWeb.org. Retrieved March 18, 2015. 
  23. ^ "M6.7 – Anzoátegui, Venezuela". United States Geological Survey. Retrieved March 18, 2015. 
  24. ^ "Significant Earthquake". National Geophysical Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved March 18, 2015. 
  25. ^ Steele, John (January 19, 1929). "Planes Rescue Unstead King from his Capital". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5. 
  26. ^ Bosworth, Mary (2005). Encyclopedia of Prisons and Correctional Facilities. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications. pp. 394–395. ISBN 978-1-4522-6542-1. 
  27. ^ "Jugo-Slavia Suppresses All Parties of Croatians". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 21, 1929. p. 6. 
  28. ^ "Vote to Suspend Goc. Johnston in Oklahoma". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 22, 1929. p. 15. 
  29. ^ "Italy Seizes and Destroys 2,000 False U.S. Passports". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 22, 1929. p. 35. 
  30. ^ "Hail Grandson of Ex-Kaiser as Heir to Crown". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 23, 1929. p. 2. 
  31. ^ "Bomb Dropped by Mistake Kills 14 Cavalrymen". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 24, 1929. p. 1. 
  32. ^ Darrah, David (January 26, 1929). "Italy Enters Big Navy Race with Powers". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 18. 
  33. ^ "Year End Review 1929 – Disasters". CanadaGenWeb.org. Retrieved March 18, 2015. 
  34. ^ a b "The Broadway Parade". Film Daily. New York: Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc.: 2 January 28, 1929. 
  35. ^ Sloat, Warren (2004). 1929: America Before the Crash. New York: Cooper Square Press. p. 111. ISBN 978-0-8154-1280-9. 
  36. ^ "Economize – Coolidge to U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 29, 1929. p. 1. 
  37. ^ "All Quiet on the Western Front". Centenary News. Retrieved March 18, 2015. 
  38. ^ "Die Büchse der Pandora". Silent Era. Retrieved March 18, 2015.