January 1930

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The following events occurred in January 1930:

January 1, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 2, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

January 3, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

January 4, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

January 5, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

January 6, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

January 7, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Contract negotiations began between Babe Ruth and the New York Yankees. Owner Jacob Ruppert offered $75,000 per year for two years, a raise of $5,000 per year over the previous three seasons. Ruth rejected the offer and demanded $85,000 annually for three years, but Ruppert refused and negotiations broke off.[12]

January 8, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 9, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

  • The Boston Bruins hockey team won their fourteenth straight game. This stood as the record for the longest winning streak in NHL history until 1982 when the New York Islanders won fifteen straight.[14]
  • Utah Senator Reed Smoot first suggested that the Boulder Dam project be renamed to Hoover Dam.[15]
  • Died: Edward Bok, 66, Dutch-born American editor and author

January 10, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

  • The Ikhwan Revolt in Arabia ended with the surrender of the rebels to the British.[16]
  • The League of Nations observed its tenth anniversary. Officials at the organization marked the occasion by reviewing its year-by-year milestones.[17]
  • Born: Roy E. Disney, nephew of Walt Disney and senior executive of The Walt Disney Company, in Los Angeles (d. 2009)

January 11, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Pope Pius XI issued a decree saying that education belonged first to the church, second to the family and third to the state. The pope condemned coed schools, explaining that "Nature ordained the two sexes for different functions in society, and, therefore, they require different education", and also warned that sex education would expose youth, "before the proper time, to opportunities for sin on the pretext of accustoming and hardening them against danger."[18]
  • Born: Rod Taylor, actor, in Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia (d. 2015)

January 12, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

January 13, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

  • A newspaper comic strip adaptation of the Disney character Mickey Mouse first appeared.[20]
  • Died: John Nathan Cobb, 61, American author, naturalist and educator

January 14, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 15, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 16, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

  • In Washington, work on legislation such as the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Bill wound up being suspended as lengthy speeches about the Volstead Act were made all day long in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate on the tenth anniversary of its coming into force.[24]

January 17, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

January 18, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

  • The German city of Cologne signed an agreement with Ford Motor Company to build a large automobile factory in the area.[27]
  • The Harvard Economic Society said, "There are indications that the severest phase of the recession is over."[28]

January 19, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

January 20, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

January 21, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • The Five Power Naval Disarmament Conference opened in London.[31] Great Britain, the United States, Japan, France and Italy sought to revise and extend the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922.[32]

January 22, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Old imperial fortifications near Kehl, Germany were blown up. Until recently they had been occupied by the French, but it was agreed at the second Hague conference that the French would evacuate the forts and the Germans would raze them afterward.[33]
  • The drama film Anna Christie, starring Greta Garbo in the title role, premiered at the Criterion Theatre in Los Angeles. This film was Garbo's first speaking role and was marketed with the famous tagline, "Garbo Talks!"[34]
  • Died: Stephen Mather, 62, American industrialist and conservationalist

January 23, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Mexico announced it was breaking off diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union. "The Mexican government has the full right to refuse to allow foreign elements to mix in its politics and to object to these foreigners making Mexico the theater of their machinations and intrigues against Mexicans, and we are determined to protect ourselves from them", Foreign Minister Genaro Estrada stated.[35]
  • Wilhelm Frick became the first Nazi to hold a cabinet post in Germany when he was appointed Minister of Internal Affairs and Public Education in Thuringia.[36]
  • The George Washington Birthplace National Monument was established.[37]
  • Born: Derek Wolcott, poet, in Castries, Saint Lucia

January 24, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

  • London financier Clarence Hatry was sentenced to 14 years in prison after pleading guilty to forgery and fraud.[38]
  • British parliament passed the second reading of a bill sponsored by Ernest Thurtle decriminalizing blasphemy and atheism.[39]
  • The U.S. Senate scrapped a proposed tariff on shoes which would have cost Americans $100 million a year.[40]
  • Born: Rita Lakin, American writer

January 25, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

January 26, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

  • A mock "Independence Day" was observed in India on the opening day of a civil disobedience campaign. British police were out in full force as rioting was expected, but apart from one incident in which communist mill workers disrupted a gathering in Mumbai the day was peaceful.[43][44]
  • Direct wireless service was inaugurated between Great Britain and Japan.[45]

January 27, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

January 28, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Miguel Primo de Rivera stepped down as dictator of Spain, handing in his resignation at 8:50 p.m. He claimed the move was for health reasons but he had in fact lost the support of the army and faced being overthrown in a coup.[47]

January 29, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 30, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

January 31, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

  • Communists and police exchanged gunfire in Hamburg when 3,000 marched through the streets agitating for a general strike. 76 communists were arrested in Berlin for plotting to stage a riot.[51]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shaffer, George (January 3, 1930). "Movie Planes Crash at Sea; 10 Die". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. 
  2. ^ Darrah, David (January 3, 1930). "Italy Pardons Thousands for Royal Wedding". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. 
  3. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 388. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  4. ^ "Capitol Artist Denies Cigaret Cause of Blaze". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Brooklyn: 1. January 4, 1930. 
  5. ^ "Chronology 1930". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  6. ^ Bradley, Edwin M. (1996). The First Hollywood Musicals: A Critical Filmography of 171 Features, 1927 Through 1932. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 91. ISBN 978-0-7864-2029-2. 
  7. ^ Foust, Hal (January 5, 1930). "New Auto Crop On Display at National Show". Chicago Daily Tribune: 24. 
  8. ^ Mueller, Mike (2006). American Horsepower. St. Paul, Minnesota: Motorbooks. p. 62. ISBN 978-1-61060-806-0. 
  9. ^ Jordan, John & Moulin, Jean (2013). French Cruisers: 1922–1956. Barnsley: Seaforth Publishing. p. 89, 167. ISBN 978-1-84832-133-5.
  10. ^ Hoffmann, David Lloyd (1994). Peasant Metropolis: Social Identities in Moscow, 1929–1941. Cornell University Press. pp. 33–34. ISBN 978-0-8014-8660-9. 
  11. ^ "Waterloo Bridge". Playbill Vault. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Ruth Rejects Yankee Offer of $75,000 a Year". Chicago Daily Tribune: 21. January 8, 1930. 
  13. ^ Darrah, David (January 9, 1930). "Princess Weds; Royalty Shines in All Its Pomp". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. 
  14. ^ Morreals, Mike G. (April 3, 2013). "Penguins move on after remarkable streak ends". NHL.com. National Hockey League. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  15. ^ Jeansonne, Glen. The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928–1933. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 211. ISBN 978-1-137-11189-0. 
  16. ^ Kostiner, Joseph (1993). The Making of Saudi Arabia, 1916–1936 : From Chieftaincy to Monarchical State. Oxford University Press. p. 140. ISBN 978-0-19-536070-7. 
  17. ^ "League 10 Years Old; Points With Pride to Works". Chicago Daily Tribune: 17. January 11, 1930. 
  18. ^ "Pope Attacks Coed Schools". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. January 12, 1930. 
  19. ^ "The great gale". The Times (45410). London. 14 January 1930. col D, p. 14. 
  20. ^ Johnson, Jimmy (2014). Inside the Whimsy Works: My Life with Walt Disney Productions. University Press of Mississippi. p. 47. ISBN 978-1-61703-930-0. 
  21. ^ "Tageseinträge für 14. Januar 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  22. ^ "You are being redirected..." earthsky.org. Retrieved 2016-11-14. 
  23. ^ "5 Die in German Riots in Memory of Red Martyrs". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3. January 16, 1930. 
  24. ^ "Congress Tied Up by 25,000 Word Dry Row". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. January 17, 1930. 
  25. ^ "Italy Opens Most Powerful Broadcast Station in Europe". Chicago Daily Tribune: 11. January 18, 1930. 
  26. ^ "1930". Grauman's Chinese. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  27. ^ "Tageseinträge für 18. Januar 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  28. ^ Galbraith, John Kenneth (2009). The Great Crash 1929. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-547-24816-5. 
  29. ^ "January 19, 1930". Plane Crash Info. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  30. ^ Allen, Jay (January 21, 1930). "19 Nations Sign Young Plan and the War is Over". Chicago Daily Tribune: 4. 
  31. ^ Steele, John (January 22, 1930). "Parley Opens; Envoys Fail to Reveal Cards". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. 
  32. ^ "The London Naval Conference, 1930". Office of the Historian. United States Department of State. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  33. ^ "Germans Blow up Rhine Fort as French Depart". Chicago Daily Tribune: 2. January 23, 1930. 
  34. ^ "Anna Christie". Garbo Forever. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  35. ^ Cornyn, John (January 24, 1930). "Mexico Breaks With Russia on 'Insults' by Reds". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3. 
  36. ^ "Der 23.1.1930 war ein Donnerstag". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015. 
  37. ^ Bruggeman, Seth C. (2008). Here, George Washington Was Born: Memory, Material Culture, and the Public. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press. p. 110. ISBN 978-0-8203-4272-6. 
  38. ^ Steele, John (January 25, 1930). "Hatry Given 14 Years for Huge London Swindle". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3. 
  39. ^ "Blasphemy law". The Straits Times. Singapore: 15. February 10, 1930. 
  40. ^ Crawford, Arthur (January 25, 1930). "Senate Votes Duty on Shoes into Discard". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. 
  41. ^ "Bomb Kills 3 on Eve if India's 'Freedom Day'". Chicago Daily Tribune: 5. January 26, 1930. 
  42. ^ "13 Held in India Raids; Bomb Molds Seized". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Brooklyn: 1. January 25, 1930. 
  43. ^ "Reds Clash with Nationalists at Free India Meet". Chicago Daily Tribune: 4. January 27, 1930. 
  44. ^ Deepak, B. R. (2001). India-China Relations. New Delhi: A.P.H. Publishing Corp. p. 94. ISBN 978-81-7648-245-5. 
  45. ^ "Open Direct Wireless from Japan to England Today". Chicago Daily Tribune: 20. January 26, 1930. 
  46. ^ "Maria Corda, Screen Star, Sues Husband for Divorce". Chicago Daily Tribune: 2. January 28, 1930. 
  47. ^ "Spain Bounces its Dictator; Riots Follow". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1–2. January 29, 1930. 
  48. ^ "Bar Filipino Boxers in Fear of Coast Riot". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. January 30, 1930. 
  49. ^ Allen, Jay (January 31, 1930). "Spain Gets New Cabinet After All Day Tussle". Chicago Daily Tribune: 10. 
  50. ^ "13 Killed, 6 badly Hurt in Blast at Turkish Mine". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3. February 1, 1930. 
  51. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 1, 1930). "Many Inured as Bullets Fly in German Red Riot". Chicago Daily Tribune: 7.