January 1931

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The following events occurred in January 1931:

January 1, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

  • The Alabama Crimson Tide beat the Washington State Cougars 24-0 in the 17th Rose Bowl Game.
  • 150,000 coal miners went on strike in South Wales.[1]
  • The kidnapping of Adolphus Busch Orthwein, the 13-year-old grandson of Anheuser-Busch CEO August Anheuser Busch, Sr., ended after 20 hours. The Busch family said no ransom had been demanded or paid.[2]
  • Benito Mussolini made an English-language radio address to the United States, offering a message of friendship and saying that Italy did not want war. "I should like to contradict many rumors spread abroad on the attitude taken by Fascism and the danger it is supposed to represent for the peace of the world", Mussolini said. "Neither I nor my government nor the Italian people desire to bring about war."[3]
  • In a lecture in Cleveland, sociology professor William Fielding Ogburn predicted that the society of the future would eradicate poverty, greatly increase education and control its birth rate based on demand.[4]
  • The Road Traffic Act came into effect in the United Kingdom.[5]

January 2, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

January 3, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

January 4, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Father Coughlin's weekly radio sermon was banned from broadcast over CBS. The sermon for the week was titled "Prosperity" and discussed unemployment – the network asked Coughlin to moderate his attacks on the Hoover Administration's economic policies.[9]
  • Died: Art Acord, 40, American actor (suicide by poison); Roger Connor, 73, American baseball player; Louise, Princess Royal, 63, British princess

January 5, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

January 6, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 7, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 8, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Ex-Charlie Chaplin wife Lita Grey and former boxer Georges Carpentier were kidnapped by four gunmen as they left a theatre in New York. The two were driven more than a mile and then dumped out; Ms. Grey reported being robbed of $14,000 in jewelry.[14]
  • Germany's total of unemployed was estimated at 4.5 million.[15]
  • Born: Bill Graham, German-born American concert promoter, in Berlin (d. 1991)

January 9, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

  • The Spanish Air Corps was temporarily abolished for one month by King Alfonso XIII as punishment for the failed December 15 revolt. When the month was up the department was to be completely reorganized with less autonomy.[16]
  • Born: Princess Theresa of Bavaria, in Schloss Wallsee, Austria
  • Died: Jean Schopfer, 62, Swiss-born French tennis player

January 10, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

  • A three-member arbitration court in Germany cut the wages of 300,000 Ruhr miners by 6 percent.[17][18]
  • Born: Peter Barnes, playwright and screenwriter, in Bow, London, England (d. 2004)
  • Died: James Milton Carroll, American Baptist pastor, 79, historian and author

January 11, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Four Catholic priests and nine students were arrested in Lithuania on charges of disseminating anti-government propaganda.[19]
  • After a week of negative publicity and an estimated 200,000 angry letters from listeners, CBS relented and allowed Father Coughlin's "Prosperity" sermon to be broadcast.[9]
  • Chicago gangster James Belcastro was shot five times by would-be assassins, but survived.[20]
  • Died: Nathan Straus, 82, American merchant and philanthropist

January 12, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

  • Agricultural experts from 26 countries met in Geneva to discuss the world's grain production problem.[21]
  • Born: Roland Alphonso, Cuban-born Jamaican saxophonist, in Havana (d. 1998)

January 13, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 14, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Chicago mobster Terry Druggan was sentenced to a year in prison for contempt of court, but his attorneys immediately secured a writ of habeas corpus that got him freed on $5,000 bail.[24]
  • Born: Caterina Valente, French-born Italian musician, dancer and actress, in Paris
  • Died: Hardy Richardson, 75, American baseball player

January 15, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

  • An earthquake struck the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico, resulting in 114 fatalities.
  • 11 Italian seaplanes led by Italo Balbo touched down at Botafogo Bay in Brazil, ending a 6,000 mile flight from Italy that began on December 17. The pilots were greeted by Brazilian president Getúlio Vargas.[25]

January 16, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

January 17, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

January 18, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

January 19, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

  • The first London Round Table Conference on India broke up with the Indian delegates having secured a pledge from Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald to allow India to advance towards self-government.[29]
  • During an address in Philadelphia, Major General Smedley Butler recounted a story which he claimed to have been told by a friend who supposedly witnessed Benito Mussolini run over and kill a child while driving recklessly in Italy. Butler claimed that when his unnamed friend riding in the car screamed, Mussolini continued driving and said, "What is one life in the affairs of a state?" Butler's remarks led to a diplomatic row between Italy and the United States.[30]
  • Born: Pat Hunt, politician, in Auckland, New Zealand; Robert MacNeil, Canadian-born American novelist, news anchor and journalist, in Montreal

January 20, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 21, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • German Foreign Minister Julius Curtius spoke before the council of the League of Nations, accusing Poland of persecuting German minorities and reaffirming Germany's hopes to someday recover the territory lost to Poland in the Treaty of Versailles.[32]
  • British MPs defeated the Education Bill, which would have raised the minimum school-leaving age from 14 to 15.[5]
  • Died: Alma Rubens, 33, actress (lobar pneumonia and bronchitis)

January 22, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

January 23, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

January 24, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

January 25, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Chancellor Brüning told the German people to forget about reparations revisions and concentrate on putting public and private finances in order. "It is not only through reparations burdens that we have fallen into financial misfortune, but to a very large measure through letting ourselves imagine that despite a lost war, despite huge sacrifices in blood and treasure, both state and individual could live better than in pre-war times", he stated.[37]

January 26, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

January 27, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Benito Mussolini sent a telegram to the Italian embassy in Washington, denying Smedley Butler's story that he had run over and killed a child. "I've never run over children or women or men. If such misfortune had happened to me it is superfluous to state that I would have done what one must do in such cases: Namely, I'd have stopped and rendered assistance. It is really unworthy of the American general to tell such ignoble falsehoods", Mussolini stated. The Italian ambassador lodged a protest with the U.S. Department of State against Butler's "untrue and slanderous allegations".[30][40]
  • Pierre Laval became Prime Minister of France.
  • Born: Mordecai Richler, writer, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada (d. 2001)

January 28, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 29, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

January 30, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

January 31, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fail to Attain Peace in British Coal Mine Row". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 13, 1931. p. 8. 
  2. ^ O'Neil, Tim (December 28, 2013). "A Look Back – Busch family heir kidnapped on New Year's Eve in 1930". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Italy Doesn't Itch for War: Duce to U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 2, 1931. p. 1. 
  4. ^ Kinsley, Philip (January 2, 1931). "Scientist Sees Poverty's End; Fewer Babies". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  5. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 400. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  6. ^ Martin, Gerald (January 3, 1931). "Panama Rebels Make Envoy to U.S. President". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  7. ^ Smith, Josh (February 13, 2013). "Fastest Two Goals in NHL History: Prospal and Letestu Make Their Mark". The Hockey Writers. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  8. ^ Aliperti, Cliff (August 14, 2012). "Smart Money (1931) Starring Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney". Immortal Ephemera. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Benjamin, Louise M. (2009). The NBC Advisory Council and Radio Programming, 1926–1945. Southern Illinois University. p. 55. ISBN 978-0-8093-8674-1. 
  10. ^ "Tageseinträge für 5. Januar 1931". chroniknet. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Hoover Speaks Word of Cheer to Auto Makers". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 7, 1931. p. 2. 
  12. ^ "Norway Grants Trotsky, Red Exile, Lecture Permit". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 7, 1931. p. 9. 
  13. ^ "2 Million Defy Cold at Funeral of Joffre". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 7, 1931. pp. 1, 11. 
  14. ^ "Two Film Stars Figure in Hold-Up". Montreal Gazette. Montreal: 15. January 9, 1931. 
  15. ^ "German Jobless Total 4,357,000 at End of Year". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 9, 1931. p. 5. 
  16. ^ Allen, Jay (January 9, 1931). "Spain's Air Corps Abolished; Army to Take it Over". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5. 
  17. ^ "German Arbiter Decrees 6% Wage Cut for 300,000 Miners". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 11, 1931. p. 4. 
  18. ^ "Tageseinträge für 10. Januar 1931". chroniknet. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  19. ^ "Tageseinträge für 11. Januar 1931". chroniknet. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  20. ^ a b "Public Enemy's Citizenship is Revoked by U. S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 1, 1931. p. 2. 
  21. ^ "26 Nations Meet to Study World Grain Problem". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 13, 1931. p. 5. 
  22. ^ "Woman Poisoners of Husband Dies on the Gallows". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 14, 1931. p. 13. 
  23. ^ "Tomorrow and Tomorrow". PlaybillVault. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  24. ^ "Terry Druggan Sent to Jail, But Stays Only for Brief Time". The Palm Beach Post. Palm Beach, Florida: 1. January 15, 1931. 
  25. ^ "Air Fleet Roars into Rio; 6,000 Mile Flight Ends". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 16, 1931. p. 12. 
  26. ^ "250,000 British Cotton Weavers are Locked Out". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 18, 1931. p. 7. 
  27. ^ "Communists a Threat to U.S., Probers Find". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 18, 1931. p. 1. 
  28. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 19, 1931). "Von Hindenburg Stirs Old Timers in Oath of Unity". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8. 
  29. ^ a b Gilbert, Martin (2012). Winston Churchill – the Wilderness Years. London: I.B. Tauris. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-85772-108-2. 
  30. ^ a b ""My Auto Never Killed a Child", Duce Declares". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 28, 1931. p. 3. 
  31. ^ Kyvig, David (1979). "Repealing National Prohibition – Chapter 6". Shaffer Library of Drug Policy. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  32. ^ Wales, Henry (January 22, 1931). "Germany Tells League it Wants Land Lost in War". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7. 
  33. ^ "French Cabinet Falls on Plan to Stabilize Wheat". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 23, 1931. p. 5. 
  34. ^ "1931". Grauman's Chinese. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  35. ^ "German Police Save Chancellor from Angry Mob". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 24, 1931. p. 6. 
  36. ^ "Estimates U. S. has 4 1/2 Millin Without Jobs". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 25, 1931. p. 6. 
  37. ^ "Stop Spending, Bruening Warns German Nation". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 26, 1931. p. 2. 
  38. ^ "Bombay Wild with Joy; 'Holy Man' Arrives". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 27, 1931. p. 1. 
  39. ^ Holston, Kim R. (2013). Movie Roadshows: A History and Filmography of Reserved-Seat Limited Showings, 1911–1973. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 72. ISBN 978-0-7864-6062-5. 
  40. ^ "Duce's Cable Revealed". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 1, 1931. p. 1. 
  41. ^ Kauffman, Peter. "Linton, Indiana, 1931: The Little Betty Coal Mine Explosion". Indiana Disasters. Retrieved May 22, 2015. 
  42. ^ Steele, John (January 30, 1931). "Churchill Quits Shadow Cabinet of British Tories". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8. 
  43. ^ "Butler Arrested; Will Fight". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 30, 1931. p. 1. 
  44. ^ "Prime Minister of Canada Calls at White House". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 31, 1931. p. 8.