January 1934

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The following events occurred in January 1934:

January 1, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

January 2, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • The Warka Vase was found at Uruk, as a collection of fragments, by German Assyriologists in their sixth excavation season.[5]
  • Cuban President Ramón Grau signed a decree setting April 22 as the date for the election of a constitutional assembly. Grau also said that he would not be continuing in the presidency beyond May 20.[6]

January 3, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 4, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

  • The Henschel Hs 121 aircraft made its maiden flight.[9]
  • A new station building was opened at Leigh-on-Sea railway station, UK.[10]
  • A bomb was thrown at the Yugoslavian consulate in Klagenfurt, Austria, damaging the building and blowing out windows of nearby buildings but not causing any injuries. Officials suspected Austrian Nazis were to blame due to recent articles in a government newspaper alleging that the Nazis promised to give Carinthia to Yugoslavia in the event of a German annexation of Austria.[11]
  • Born: Rudolf Schuster, President of Slovakia 1999–2004, in Košice

January 5, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

January 6, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

January 7, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

January 8, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

January 9, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 10, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 11, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

January 12, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

January 13, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

January 14, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

January 15, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

January 16, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 17, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Carlos Hevia resigned as President of Cuba on just his third day in office.[40]
  • The Jonker diamond was found at the Elandsfontein mine in South Africa by Johannes Jacobus Jonker.
  • The Prussian Economic and Labour Ministry ordered miners to accompany their traditional greeting of "Glück auf" with a raising of the right hand.[41]
  • Born: Cedar Walton, jazz pianist, in Dallas, Texas (d. 2013)

January 18, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Manuel Márquez Sterling became the new President of Cuba for a few hours and was then replaced by Carlos Mendieta.
  • Engelbert Dollfuss made a speech implicitly warning Germany not to meddle in Austrian affairs, saying that "it is perhaps not an entirely safe game when a country, whose importance in central Europe and, indeed, all Europe is generally understood and recognized, continues to be constitutionally threatened in its independence and freedom by a great power – which unfortunately is also a country inhabited by brother folk."[42]
  • German cargo ship MV Leverkusen collided with Danish ship SS Frederiksborg at Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands, and was beached.
  • British cargo ship SS Oakford ran aground off Vlieland, Friesland, Netherlands and was wrecked with the loss of nine crew.
  • Australian airlines Qantas and Imperial Airways joined forces and establish "Qantas Empire Airways".
  • Born: Raymond Briggs, illustrator and author, in Wimbledon, London, England

January 19, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

January 20, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

January 21, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

January 22, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

January 23, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 24, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 25, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

January 26, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

January 27, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

January 28, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

January 29, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

January 30, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • On the first anniversary of Hitler's appointment as chancellor, the Reichstag passed the "Law on the Reconstruction of the Reich" (Gesetz über den Neuaufbau des Reiches), transferring sovereignty rights of the states to the federal government. Hitler appeared before the Reichstag and gave a lengthy speech listing his government's accomplishments.[66]
  • Soviet pilots Pavel Fedosenko, Andrey Vasenko, and Ilya Usyskin took the hydrogen-filled high-altitude balloon Osoaviakhim-1 on its maiden flight to a record-setting altitude of 22,000 meters (72,000 ft), where it remained for twelve minutes. The 7-hour 14-minute flight—during which the balloon traveled 470 kilometers (290 mi) from its launch site—ended in tragedy when the crew loses control of the balloon during its descent and the gondola disintegrates and crashes near the village of Potizh-Ostrog in Insarsky District of Mordovian Autonomous Oblast in the Soviet Union, killing the crew.[67]
  • Over 6,000 dances and parties were held across the United States on the occasion of President Roosevelt's 52nd birthday as a fundraiser for the Warm Springs Foundation and polio rehabilitation. Over $1 million was raised.[68][69]
  • President Roosevelt signed the Gold Reserve Act into law.
  • Artist Salvador Dalí and his muse Gala were married in a simple civil ceremony in Paris.[70]
  • Born: Tammy Grimes, US actress and singer, in Lynn, Massachusetts (d. 2016)

January 31, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Édouard Daladier became Prime Minister of France for the second time.
  • Police in Chicago apprehended bank robber and kidnapper Verne Sankey in a barber shop.[71]
  • Italy announced its support for negotiations that would allow rearmament for Germany, expressing confidence that Germany was not thinking of "war-like moves outside her borders" and that guarantees would be provided that the increased armaments would not be used to infringe upon the security of other nations.[72]
  • Sir Philip Whistler Street completed his term of office as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, to be replaced by Sir Frederick Richard Jordan.
  • Born: Bob Turner, ice hockey player, in Regina, Saskatchewan (d. 2005), Grahame Woods, cinematographer, television playwright and novelist

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mearl, Jean (January 25, 2009). "Montrose flood roared through the Crescenta Valley as 1934 began". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  2. ^ Encyclopedia of British and Irish Political Organisations. Retrieved 15 September 2010. 
  3. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 436. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  4. ^ An Encyclopedia of New Zealand 1966
  5. ^ Ralf B. Wartke, "Eine Vermißtenliste (2): Die "Warka-Vase" aus Bagdad", Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 26 April 2003, Nbr 97, page 39.. English translation here. (The author is a deputy director of the Berliner Vorderasiatischen Museums).
  6. ^ Reno, Gustavo (January 3, 1934). "Grau to Quit Presidency of Cuba May 20". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  7. ^ Peters, Gerbhard; Woolley, John T. "Annual Message to Congress – January 3, 1934". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Osek in 20th Century". Town of Osek. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  9. ^ Grey, C.G. (1972). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1938. London: David & Charles. ISBN 0-7153-5734-4. p157
  10. ^ "Railway Magazine" December 1956
  11. ^ "Bomb Jugo-Slav Consulate in Austria; Nazis Blamed". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 5, 1934. p. 1. 
  12. ^ Noonan, William. "Fenway Park Fire". City of Boston.gov. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Another British steamer stranded". The Times (46645). London. 6 January 1934. col G, p. 15. 
  14. ^ "Hitler Bishop Sets Himself Up as Dictator". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 7, 1934. p. 1. 
  15. ^ "Casualty reports". The Times (46646). London. 8 January 1934. col C, p. 23. 
  16. ^ "Casualty reports". The Times (46660). London. 24 January 1934. col F, p. 20. 
  17. ^ "Nazi Police Raid Sunday School Boys in Berlin". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 8, 1934. p. 5. 
  18. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, pp. 152–153.
  19. ^ Reno, Gustavo (January 9, 1934). "Cuban Teachers Strike; Protest Tyrannical Rule". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 9. 
  20. ^ "Tageseinträge für 9. Januar 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  21. ^ "History in Pictures" (PDF). White Bear Township. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 22, 2015. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
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  24. ^ "Fascisti Take Over Control of Austrian Police". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 12, 1934. p. 6. 
  25. ^ "Nazi Police Raid Pastors' Homes in Church Fight". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 12, 1934. p. 6. 
  26. ^ Steele, John (January 13, 1934). "Pride of British Fleet is Stuck in Mud 12 Hours". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2. 
  27. ^ Bergfelder, Tim & Cargnelli, Christian. Destination London: German-speaking Emigres and British Cinema, 1925–1950. Berghahn Books, 2008. p.148
  28. ^ * "Evolution of the world record 500 meters Women". SpeedSkatingStats.com. Retrieved 29 August 2012. 
  29. ^ Speck, Eugene (January 14, 1934). "Greek Premier Insists Insull Must Go Jan. 31". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 17. 
  30. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 15, 1934). "German Pastors Again Tell Nazi Bishop to Resign". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6. 
  31. ^ Crawley, Robert (2007). Torquay Trams. West Country Historic Omnibus and Transport Trust. pp. 10–12. 
  32. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  33. ^ Reno, Gustavo (January 16, 1934). "Fire on Rioters as Cuba Gets New President". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  34. ^ "Linien", KunstOnLine.dk. (in Danish) Retrieved 1 June 2012.
  35. ^ Barrow, Blanche Caldwell (2004). My Life with Bonnie and Clyde. University of Oklahoma Press. pp. 217–219. ISBN 978-0-8061-8675-7. 
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  37. ^ "Masonic Lodges in Prussia Wiped Out by Goering". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 17, 1934. p. 9. 
  38. ^ "The Lost Islands". Stornoway: Comhairle nan Eilean Siar. 2013-08-29. Retrieved 2014-05-19. 
  39. ^ "Wednesday's Child". Playbill Vault. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  40. ^ Reno, Gustavo (January 18, 1934). "Head of Cuban Army Names New President". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  41. ^ "Tageseinträge für 17. Januar 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  42. ^ "Austria Warns Hitler to Drop Hostile Stand". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 19, 1934. p. 5. 
  43. ^ Sassoon, Donald (2006). Culture of the Europeans: From 1800 to the Present. HarperCollins. p. 1062. 
  44. ^ Burns, Edward (January 20, 1934). "Jackson Loses Fight to Re-Enter Baseball". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 19. 
  45. ^ Thomsett, Michael C. (1997). The German Opposition to Hitler: The Resistance, the Underground, and Assassination Plots, 1938–1945. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-7864-0372-1. 
  46. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 87.
  47. ^ "Tageseinträge für 20. Januar 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  48. ^ Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 378–379. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  49. ^ "'Black Fog' Obscures Galli-Curci Singing on Stage in London". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 22, 1934. p. 1. 
  50. ^ "Penafiel". ZeroZero (in Portuguese). Retrieved 22 February 2013. 
  51. ^ "Jap War Chief Resigns; Seen as U. S. Peace Gain". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 22, 1934. p. 5. 
  52. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 24, 1934). "Catholics Defy Hitler; Bishop Bans Nazi Books". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16. 
  53. ^ "1934". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  54. ^ "Cuba Recognized by U.S.; Sees End of Revolt Era". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 24, 1934. p. 5. 
  55. ^ "Nazis Establish Courts to Try Newspapermen". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 24, 1934. p. 16. 
  56. ^ Mart Nutt (October 3, 2012). "The Second Constitution of the Republic of Estonia (1934–1937) and the Coup d'État of 1934". Estonica. Estonian Institute. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  57. ^ "Fascist State Born in Estonia; Dictator Rules". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 24, 1934. p. 16. 
  58. ^ Julian Jackson, The Popular Front in France: Defending Democracy, 1934–38, p 22
  59. ^ Jowett (2017), p. 218.
  60. ^ John Dillinger timeline. Accessed 22 June 2015
  61. ^ Taylor, Edmond (January 28, 1934). "Paris Cabinet Falls as Mobs Battle Police". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  62. ^ "Head of Panama Escapes Plot to Assassinate Him". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 2, 1934. p. 6. 
  63. ^ Reno, Gustavo (January 29, 1934). "Cuban Railmen Defy President; 5,000 on Strike". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5. 
  64. ^ "Casualty reports". The Times (46665). London. 30 January 1934. col C, p. 24. 
  65. ^ Darrah, David (January 30, 1934). "Austria Masses Peasants; Fears Attack by Nazis". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8. 
  66. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 31, 1934). "Nazis Reward Hitler; Becomes Ruler of States". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7. 
  67. ^ Account at www.astronautix.com Archived 2007-09-14 at the Wayback Machine.
  68. ^ "6,000 Parties Held in Honor of Roosevelt". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 31, 1934. p. 1. 
  69. ^ Wilson, Daniel J. (2009). Polio. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, LLC. p. 41. ISBN 978-0-313-35897-5. 
  70. ^ Etherington-Smith, Meredith (1995). The Persistence of Memory: A Biography of Dalí. Da Capo Press. p. 170. ISBN 978-0-306-80662-9. 
  71. ^ "U. S. Traps Kidnaper Sankey". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 1, 1934. p. 1. 
  72. ^ "Duce Aids Hitler". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 1, 1934. p. 5. 
  • Jowett, Philip S. (2017). The Bitter Peace. Conflict in China 1928–37. Stroud: Amberley Publishing. ISBN 978-1445651927.