January 1936

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The following events occurred in January 1936:

January 1, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 2, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

January 3, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

  • U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt presented the annual State of the Union address to Congress. The president spoke at length about the international situation and warned that "a point has been reached where the people of the Americas must take cognizance of growing ill-will, of marked trends toward aggression, of increasing armaments, of shortening tempers — a situation which has in it many of the elements that lead to the tragedy of general war." Roosevelt asserted that if another age of war was at hand, "the United States and the rest of the Americas can play but one role: through a well-ordered neutrality to do naught to encourage the contest, through adequate defense to save ourselves from embroilment and attack, and through example and all legitimate encouragement and assistance to persuade other Nations to return to the ways of peace and good-will."[3]
  • The Polish government freed 27,000 prisoners under a general amnesty.[1]
  • The comedy-drama film Riffraff starring Jean Harlow and Spencer Tracy was released.

January 4, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

January 5, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

January 6, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

January 7, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • The Spanish Cortes Generales was dissolved and new elections called for February.[4]
  • Iran became the first Muslim country to ban the wearing of veils in public.[5] In the years prior to the 1979 Revolution, Iran celebrated January 7 as Women's Day to mark this event.[6]

January 8, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Ethiopia asked the League of Nations to dispatch a commission to investigate the use of poison gas by Italian troops.[7]
  • Jewish booksellers throughout Nazi Germany were ordered to turn in their Reich Publications Chamber membership cards, without which no one was permitted to sell books.[8]
  • Reza Shah of Iran issued the Kashf-e hijab decree, ordering police to remove the hijab from any woman in public.
  • Born: Robert May, Baron May of Oxford, scientist, in Sydney, Australia

January 9, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

January 10, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

January 11, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

January 12, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

January 13, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

January 14, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 15, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 16, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

January 17, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

January 18, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

January 19, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

  • A memorial to Theodore Roosevelt was dedicated in New York City. President Franklin D. Roosevelt made a speech paying tribute to his predecessor in the office and fourth cousin, describing him as "a great patriot and a great soul."[23]

January 20, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

January 21, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 22, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 23, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

January 24, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

  • Albert Sarraut became the new French Prime Minister.
  • President Roosevelt sent a short handwritten message saying he would not sign the Adjusted Compensation Payment Bill, explaining that it only differed in two respects from the bill he had already vetoed at the last session. Prior to this note, Theodore Roosevelt had been the last president to write a veto message by hand. The House promptly took a vote and overrode the presidential veto by a count of 324 to 61.[30]
  • The First Battle of Tembien ended in a draw.[12]
  • Died: Harry Peach, 61 or 62, English businessman and author

January 25, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Al Smith announced in a radio address that due to his opposition to the New Deal, he would not be supporting Roosevelt in the 1936 election campaign as he had in 1932.[31]
  • General Francisco Franco was selected as Spain's representative to attend the funeral of George V.[32]

January 26, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

January 27, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

January 28, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 29, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 30, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

January 31, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 462. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  2. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 3, 1936). "Hitler Warns League to Mind Own Business". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  3. ^ Peters, Gerbhard; Woolley, John T. "Annual Message to Congress – January 3, 1936". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Spanish Cortes Dissolved". The Courier-Mail. Brisbane: 12. January 9, 1936. 
  5. ^ Jahanpour, Farhang (2014). "Iran's Elections Matter". Inter Press Service. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  6. ^ Milani, Farzaneh (1992). Veils and Words: The Emerging Voices of Iranian Women Writers. Syracuse University Press. p. 34. ISBN 978-0-8156-2557-5. 
  7. ^ "Ask League Inquiry on Italy". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 9, 1936. p. 13. 
  8. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 9, 1936). "Beef Shortage Drives Germany to Frozen Meat". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13. 
  9. ^ "1936". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on June 10, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Old Santo Dimingo Gets a New name; It Is Trujillo City". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 10, 1936. p. 1. 
  11. ^ "Antisemitic Legislation 1933–1939". Holocaust Encyclopedia. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  12. ^ a b c d Nicolle, David (2005). The Italian Invasion of Abyssinia 1935–36. Osprey Publishing. pp. 9–10. ISBN 978-1-85532-692-7. 
  13. ^ "Tageseinträge für 13. Januar 1936". chroniknet. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  14. ^ "New Speed King of Air Smashes Trans-U. S. Mark". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 14, 1936. p. 1. 
  15. ^ "Accident Details". PlaneCrashInfo. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  16. ^ a b "Chronology 1936". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Japan Quits Parley As Equality Demand For Navy Is Refused". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 15, 1936. p. 1. 
  18. ^ a b Baer, George W. (1976). Test Case: Italy, Ethiopia, and the League of Nations. Leland Stanford Junior University. p. 181. 
  19. ^ Edwards, Willard (January 17, 1936). "Reprieve Gives Bruno At Least 60 Days to Live". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  20. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 18, 1936). "German Colonies Lost in War Must Be Returned: Goebbels". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6. 
  21. ^ Ratcliffe, Susan (2010). Oxford Dictionary of Quotations by Subject. Oxford University Press. p. 506. ISBN 978-0-19-956706-5. 
  22. ^ "New Patriarch is Elected by Greek Orthodox Church". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 19, 1936. p. 7. 
  23. ^ Edwards, Willard (January 20, 1936). "Roosevelt Pays 'T. R.' Honor as 'Great Patriot'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  24. ^ Darrah, David (January 21, 1936). "George V Dies; Edward King". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  25. ^ "Edward VIII Takes Oath as Monarch". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 21, 1936. p. 1. 
  26. ^ "Laval Resigns With Cabinet". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 22, 1936. p. 1. 
  27. ^ "President Gets Bill for Bonus in Baby Bonds". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 23, 1936. p. 1. 
  28. ^ "Mercury Falls 42 Degrees, 4 Die Here". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 23, 1936. p. 1. 
  29. ^ Darrah, David (January 24, 1936). "King George V Returns to his Capital in Death". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7. 
  30. ^ "Senate Votes Bonus Monday". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 25, 1936. p. 1. 
  31. ^ Manly, Chesly (January 26, 1936). "New Deal Fraud: Al Smith". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  32. ^ Cortada, James W., ed. (1982). Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 495. ISBN 0-313-22054-9. 
  33. ^ "Senate Overrides Bonus Veto, 76-19". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 27, 1936. p. 1. 
  34. ^ "George V Laid to Rest with Pomp and Sorrow; Six Monarchs at Grave". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. January 28, 1936. p. 1. 
  35. ^ "Kills Loeb; Prison Scandal". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 29, 1936. p. 1. 
  36. ^ "This Day in History – Baseball Hall of Fame inducts first members". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved August 16, 2015. 
  37. ^ "Soviet Scientists Revive Insects Born Over 3,000 Years Ago". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 30, 1936. p. 1. 
  38. ^ "Japanese Raids Made to Incite War, Reds Claim". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 4, 1936. p. 4. 
  39. ^ "Boston Braves". Baseball Library. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved August 16, 2015.