January 1938

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
01
02 03 04 05 06 07 08
09 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  

The following events occurred in January 1938:

January 1, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

January 2, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

January 3, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

  • The BBC made its first non-English broadcast, in Arabic. Listeners throughout the Middle East tuned in to a one-hour broadcast mostly consisting of a news bulletin on regional events. The audience reportedly expressed disappointment that the broadcast was not interspersed with love songs like Italy's programming was.[4][5]
  • Egyptian Prime Minister Muhammad Mahmoud Pasha prorogued the fractious parliament for one month.[6] As the President of the Chamber read King Farouk's message of prorogation, the parliamentary deputies held a closed-door session in which they passed a motion of no-confidence against the government, 180-17. However, the government considered the motion illegal and ignored it.[4]
  • U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered the annual State of the Union address to Congress. Acknowledging that the world was in a state of "high tension and disorder," the president stated that "we must keep ourselves adequately strong in self-defense." Roosevelt also called for legislation to "end starvation wages and intolerable hours" as "an essential part of economic recovery."[7]
  • The musical play The Cradle Will Rock written by Marc Blitzstein and directed by Orson Welles made its Broadway debut at the Windsor Theatre.[8]
  • The March of Dimes was founded.

January 4, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 5, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 6, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

January 7, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

  • Italy announced a massive new naval construction program. Two battleships were to be constructed by 1941.[9][14]
  • Born: Roland Topor, illustrator, writer and actor, in Paris, France (d. 1997)

January 8, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

January 9, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

January 10, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

January 11, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 12, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 13, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

January 14, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

January 15, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

  • The Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union announced an expanded naval program and passed a war emergency measure allowing the Presidium to proclaim martial law or a state of war.[24]
  • Died: Harold R. Atteridge, 51, American composer, librettist and lyricist; Paul Raphael Montford, 69, English sculptor

January 16, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

  • While the Chinese government was still considering how to respond to the Japanese ultimatum, Japan announced it was ending diplomatic relations with China. In Japanese, this was known as the aite ni sezu ("absolutely no dealing") declaration.[19]

January 17, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

January 18, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 19, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 20, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

January 21, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

January 22, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

January 23, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

January 24, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

January 25, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 26, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 27, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Werner von Blomberg resigned his post "for reasons of health" and returned to his honeymoon in Capri, Italy. Hitler had promised to return von Blomberg to his post once the controversy passed, but he was never recalled for duty.[21][36][37]
  • The Honeymoon Bridge collapsed.[32]

January 28, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

  • 15 people, including three army officers, were arrested in Greece for plotting to assassinate Ioannis Metaxas.[38]
  • Experiencing great personal duress from the Blomberg–Fritsch Affair, Hitler cancelled plans to hold a special session of the Reichstag on Sunday to celebrate the fifth anniversary of coming to power. The official reason given was that the international situation made it an inopportune time to make any foreign policy statements.[34][39]
  • Died: Bernd Rosemeyer, 28, German racing driver (auto accident during a land speed record attempt)

January 29, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

January 30, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

January 31, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gay Estonians Celebrate End of Dictatorship". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 1, 1938. p. 2.
  2. ^ Brewer, Sam (January 1, 1938). "George VI Hands Out 6 Peerages in New Year List". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  3. ^ "Chinese to Burn Canton if Japs Close in on City". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 3, 1938. p. 4.
  4. ^ a b Darrah, David (January 4, 1938). "Britain's First broadcast to Arabs a Flop". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  5. ^ a b c "1938". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  6. ^ "Egyptian Parliament Released for Minth by Premier's Order". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 3, 1938. p. 4.
  7. ^ Peters, Gerbhard; Woolley, John T. "Annual Message to Congress - January 3, 1938". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  8. ^ "The Cradle Will Rock". Playbill Vault. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  9. ^ a b c "Chronology 1938". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  10. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications. p. 492. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  11. ^ "Raid China's New Air Fleet". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 5, 1938. p. 1.
  12. ^ Matthäus, Jürgen; Roseman, Mark (2010). Jewish Responses to Persecution: 1933–1938. AltaMira Press. p. 448. ISBN 978-0-7591-1910-9.
  13. ^ "Tageseinträge für 6. Januar 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  14. ^ "Tageseinträge für 7. Januar 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  15. ^ "Movie and Auto Industries Lead in '36 Salaries". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 9, 1938. p. 1.
  16. ^ Simkin, John (2014). "Spanish Civil War: Chronology". Spartacus Educational. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  17. ^ "Tageseinträge für 9. Januar 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  18. ^ "U-Boat Sinks Dutch Vessel Nearing Spain". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 12, 1938. p. 6.
  19. ^ a b Mitter, Rana (2013). Forgotten Ally: China's World War II, 1937–1945. Mariner Books. p. 146. ISBN 978-0-547-84056-7.
  20. ^ "Tageseinträge für 11. Januar 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  21. ^ a b c "Hitler Becomes Army Commander". History Place. 2001. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  22. ^ Brewer, Sam (January 14, 1938). "Ulster, Uneasy Over De Valera, Calls Election". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16.
  23. ^ Taylor, Edmond (January 14, 1938). "Oust French Popular Front". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  24. ^ "Russia Plunges into Naval Race; Plans 'Big Ships'". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 16, 1938. p. 6.
  25. ^ "Today in Canadian History". Canada Channel. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  26. ^ Taylor, Edmond (January 19, 1938). "New Chautemps Cabinet Formed; Reds Left Out". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  27. ^ "Alexander is Voted Place in Baseball Hall of Fame". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 19, 1938. p. 17.
  28. ^ "Tageseinträge für 19. Januar 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  29. ^ Small, Alex (January 21, 1938). "Cairo Whoops it Up; 500,000 Hail New Queen". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  30. ^ Garbarini, Alexandra (2011). Jewish Responses to Persecution: 1938–1940. AltaMira Press. p. 229. ISBN 978-0-7591-2041-9.
  31. ^ a b West, Nigel; Tsarev, Oleg (1999). The Crown Jewels: The British Secrets at the Heart of the KGB Archives. Yale University Press. pp. 124–126. ISBN 978-0-300-07806-0.
  32. ^ a b "The Honeymoon Steel Arch Bridge". Niagara Falls Info. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  33. ^ Eubank, Keith (2004). The Origins of World War II, Third Edition. Harlan Davidson, Inc. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-118-81875-6.
  34. ^ a b c d MacDonogh, Giles (2009). 1938: Hitler's Gamble. Basic Books. pp. 11–12, 15. ISBN 978-0-465-02205-2.
  35. ^ "Hand Grenades Explode Near Paris; 14 Slain". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 27, 1938. p. 3.
  36. ^ "Werner von Blomberg". World War II Database. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  37. ^ Duffy, James P.; Ricci, Vincent (2011). Target Hitler: The Many Plots to Kill Adolf Hitler. Enigma Books. ISBN 978-1-936274-03-1.
  38. ^ "Greek Army Men Seized for Plot to Kill Dictator". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 29, 1938. p. 7.
  39. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (January 29, 1938). "Nazis Reported Split Over War Chief's Wedding". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.
  40. ^ Robinson, Curtis B. (2011). Caught Red Starred: The Woolwich Spy Ring and Stalin's Naval Rearmament on the Eve of War. Xlibris Corporation. p. 18. ISBN 978-1-4653-4042-9.
  41. ^ "Tageseinträge für 29. Januar 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  42. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 1, 1938). "Nazi 'Council of War Economics' to Run Industry". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8.