National Stadium (Tokyo)

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National Stadium
Kokuritsu Kyōgijō
Yamazaki-nabisco-Cup final 2004.jpg
Location 10-2, Kasumigaoka-machi, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan
Owner Japan Sport Council
Capacity 48,000 (original seated)
Record attendance 91,107
Pride Shockwave, at 21–22 March 2014
Field size 105 × 68 m
Surface Grass
Construction
Opened 1958
Closed 2014 (For rebuilding)
Architect Mitsuo Katayama

National Stadium (国立競技場?) was a multi-purpose stadium in Kasumigaoka, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan. The stadium served as the main stadium for the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as being the venue for track and field events at the 1964 Summer Olympic Games. The Japan national football team's home matches and major football club cup finals were held at the stadium. The stadium's official capacity was 57,363, but the real capacity was only 48,000 seats.

Demolition was completed in May 2015, and the site will be redeveloped with a new larger-capacity National Olympic Stadium.[1] The new stadium is set to be the main venue for the 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games.

The original plans for the new stadium were scrapped in July 2015 by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who announced a rebid after a public outcry because of increased building costs. As a result, the new design will not be ready for the 2019 Rugby World Cup, as originally intended.[2] A new design created by architect Kengo Kuma was chosen in December 2015 to replace the original design and is to be completed in November 2019.

History[edit]

The stadium was completed in 1958 as the Japanese National Stadium on the site of the former Meiji Shrine Outer Park Stadium. Its first major event was the 1958 Asian Games.

The venue was unscathed by the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Yasuhiro Nakamori, international relations director for the Japanese Olympic Committee, told Around the Rings he attributed the lack of damage to Japan's stringent building codes.[3]

Notable Events[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Access to the stadium was from Sendagaya or Shinanomachi stations along the JR Chūō-Sōbu Line; from Kokuritsu Kyogijo Station on the Toei Oedo Line; and from Gaienmae Station on the Tokyo Metro Ginza Line.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Demolition of Tokyo's old Olympic stadium completed, clearing way for new 2020 Olympic venue". espn.go.com. ESPN. 2015-05-13. Retrieved 2015-09-26. 
  2. ^ Himmer, Alastair (17 July 2015). "Japan rips up 2020 Olympic stadium plans to start anew". news.yahoo.com. AFP. Retrieved 17 July 2015. 
  3. ^ "Tokyo Olympic Venues Escape Earthquake Damage". Aroundtherings.com. 2011-03-11. Retrieved 2015-09-26. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Stadio Olimpico
Rome
Summer Olympics
Opening and Closing Ceremonies (National Stadium)

1964
Succeeded by
Estadio Olímpico Universitario
Mexico City
Preceded by
Stadio Olimpico
Rome
Olympic Athletics competitions
Main Venue

1964
Succeeded by
Estadio Olímpico Universitario
Mexico City
Preceded by
Stadio Flaminio
Rome
Summer Olympics
Football Men's Finals (National Stadium)

1964
Succeeded by
Estadio Azteca
Mexico City
Preceded by
Two-legged
finals
Intercontinental Cup
Final Venue

1980–2001
Succeeded by
International Stadium Yokohama
Yokohama
Preceded by
Vacant
( Two-legged finals )
AFC Champions League
Final Venue

2009, 2010
Succeeded by
Jeonju World Cup Stadium
Preceded by
Bielefelder Alm
Bielefeld
FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
Final Venue

2012
Succeeded by
Olympic Stadium
Montreal

Coordinates: 35°40′41″N 139°42′53″E / 35.67806°N 139.71472°E / 35.67806; 139.71472