Japanese general election, 1924

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Japanese general election, 1924
Empire of Japan
← 1920 10 May 1924 1928 →

All 464 seats to the House of Representatives
233 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Takaaki Kato suit.jpg Korekiyo Takahashi formal.jpg
Leader Kato Takaaki  – Takahashi Korekiyo
Party Kenseikai Seiyūhontō Seiyūkai
Last election 110 seats, 27.5%  – 278 seats, 56.2%
Seats won 151 111 103
Seat change Increase41  – Decrease175
Popular vote 872,533 730,077 666,317
Percentage 29.3% 24.8% 22.2%
Swing Increase1.8%  – Decrease34.0%

  Fourth party
  Inukai Tsuyoshi.jpg
Leader Inukai Tsuyoshi
Party Kakushin Club
Last election  –
Seats won 30
Seat change  –
Popular vote 182,720
Percentage 6.1%
Swing  –

Prime Minister before election

Kiyoura Keigo
Independent

Subsequent Prime Minister

Kato Takaaki
Kenseikai

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General elections were held in Japan on 10 May 1924.[1] No party won a majority of seats, resulting in Kenseikai, Rikken Seiyūkai and the Kakushin Club forming the country's first coalition government led by Katō Takaaki.

Electoral system[edit]

The 464 members of the House of Representatives were elected in 295 single-member constituencies, 68 two-member constituencies and 11 three-member constituencies. Voting was restricted to men aged over 25 who paid at least 3 yen a year in direct taxation.[2]

Campaign[edit]

A total of 972 candidates contested the elections, of which 265 were from Kenseikai, 242 from Seiyūhontō, 218 from Rikken Seiyūkai, 53 from the Kakushin Club and 194 from minor parties or running as independents.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Kenseikai 872,533 29.3 151 +41
Seiyūhontō 730,077 24.8 111 New
Rikken Seiyūkai 666,317 22.2 103 –175
Kakushin Club 182,720 6.1 30 New
Others 521,311 17.5 69 +22
Invalid/blank votes 25,310
Total 2,998,268 100 464 0
Registered voters/turnout 3,288,405 91.2
Source: Mackie & Rose, Voice Japan

References[edit]

  1. ^ Thomas T Mackie & Richard Rose (1991) The International Almanac of Electoral History, Macmillan, p281
  2. ^ Mackie & Rose, p276