Japanese submarine I-22 (1938)

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History
Naval Ensign of Japan.svgEmpire of Japan
Name: I-22
Builder: Kawasaki Shipbuilding
Laid down: November 25, 1937
Launched: January 25, 1939
Completed: March 10, 1941
Commissioned: Yokosuka, Japan on March 10, 1941
Struck: December 15, 1942
Fate: Disappeared while on patrol near Malaita in the Solomon Islands on or around October 4, 1942 and was presumed lost with all 100 hands.
General characteristics
Class and type: Type C1 submarine
Displacement:
  • 2,595 tonnes (2,554 long tons) surfaced
  • 3,618 tonnes (3,561 long tons) submerged
Length: 109.3 m (358 ft 7 in) overall
Beam: 9.1 m (29 ft 10 in)
Draft: 5.3 m (17 ft 5 in)
Installed power:
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 23.5 knots (43.5 km/h; 27.0 mph) surfaced
  • 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 14,000 nmi (26,000 km; 16,000 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) surfaced
  • 60 nmi (110 km; 69 mi) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) submerged
Test depth: 100 m (330 ft)
Crew: 95
Armament:
Notes: Fitted to carry 1 × Type A midget submarine

The Japanese submarine I-22 was one of five Type C cruiser submarines of the C1 sub-class built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) during the 1930s.

Design and description[edit]

The Type C submarines were derived from the earlier KD6 sub-class of the Kaidai class with a heavier torpedo armament for long-range attacks. They displaced 2,595 tonnes (2,554 long tons) surfaced and 3,618 tonnes (3,561 long tons) submerged. The submarines were 109.3 meters (358 ft 7 in) long, had a beam of 9.1 meters (29 ft 10 in) and a draft of 5.3 meters (17 ft 5 in). They had a diving depth of 100 meters (330 ft).[1]

For surface running, the boats were powered by two 6,200-brake-horsepower (4,623 kW) diesel engines, each driving one propeller shaft. When submerged each propeller was driven by a 1,000-horsepower (746 kW) electric motor. They could reach 23.6 knots (43.7 km/h; 27.2 mph) on the surface and 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) underwater.[2] On the surface, the C1s had a range of 14,000 nautical miles (26,000 km; 16,000 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph); submerged, they had a range of 60 nmi (110 km; 69 mi) at 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph).[3]

The boats were armed with eight internal bow 53.3 cm (21.0 in) torpedo tubes and carried a total of 20 torpedoes. They were also armed with a single 140 mm (5.5 in)/40 deck gun and two single or twin mounts for 25 mm (1 in) Type 96 anti-aircraft guns. They were equipped to carry one Type A midget submarine aft of the conning tower.[3]

Construction and career[edit]

I-22 was commissioned at Yokosuka, Japan on March 10, 1941. The submarine participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Battle of the Coral Sea, and the attack on Sydney Harbour in May and June 1942. I-22 disappeared while on patrol near Malaita in the Solomon Islands on or around October 4, 1942 and was presumed lost with all 100 hands.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bagnasco, p. 192
  2. ^ Chesneau, p. 201
  3. ^ a b Carpenter & Dorr, p. 104

References[edit]

  • Bagnasco, Erminio (1977). Submarines of World War Two. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-962-6.
  • Boyd, Carl & Yoshida, Akikiko (2002). The Japanese Submarine Force and World War II. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-015-0.
  • Carpenter, Dorr B. & Polmar, Norman (1986). Submarines of the Imperial Japanese Navy 1904–1945. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-396-6.
  • Chesneau, Roger, ed. (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946. Greenwich, UK: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-146-7.
  • Hackett, Bob & Sander Kingsepp (2013). "HIJMS Submarine I-22: Tabular Record of Movement". Sensuikan!. Combinedfleet.com. Retrieved 19 August 2015.
  • Hashimoto, Mochitsura (1954). Sunk: The Story of the Japanese Submarine Fleet 1942 – 1945. Colegrave, E.H.M. (translator). London: Cassell and Company. ASIN B000QSM3L0.
  • Stille, Mark (2007). Imperial Japanese Navy Submarines 1941-45. New Vanguard. 135. Botley, Oxford, UK: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84603-090-1.