Jarash, Jerusalem

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Jarash
Jarash is located in Mandatory Palestine
Jarash
Jarash
Arabic جرش
Name meaning Jerash; personal name[1]
Subdistrict Jerusalem
Coordinates 31°43′47″N 35°00′58″E / 31.72972°N 35.01611°E / 31.72972; 35.01611Coordinates: 31°43′47″N 35°00′58″E / 31.72972°N 35.01611°E / 31.72972; 35.01611
Palestine grid 151/126
Population 190[2][3] (1945)
Area 3,518[3] dunams
Date of depopulation 21,October, 1948[4]
Cause(s) of depopulation Military assault by Yishuv forces

Jarash (Arabic: جرش‎‎) was a Palestinian village that was depopulated over the course of 1948 Arab-Israeli war. Located 25 kilometers west of Jerusalem, Jarash was a wholly Arab village of 220 inhabitants in 1948.

History[edit]

To the east of the village lay Khirbat Sira, which is identified with a Mamluk/Ottoman village.[5] In 1863 Victor Guérin found Jarash to have 25 inhabitants.[6]

In 1883, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine described Jarash was described as a village built on the spur of a hill with olive trees growing below it.[7]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine, conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Jarash had a population 115, all Muslims,[8] increasing in the 1931 census to 164, still all Muslim, in a total of 33 houses.[9]

In 1945 the population was 190, all Muslims,[2] while the total land area was 3,518 dunams, according to an official land and population survey.[3] Of this, 5 were allocated for plantations and irrigable land, 1,335 for cereals,[10] while 5 dunams were classified as built-up areas.[11]

1948 and aftermath[edit]

There are no Israeli settlements on the site of the former town, though it is located within present-day Israel.

Walid Khalidi writes of Jarash:

"The site is overgrown with grass, interspersed with the debris of destroyed houses and stones from the terraces. The ruins of a cemetery lie northwest of the site. Groves of trees cover two hills to the west of the site that are separated by a valley. Carob, fig, almond, and olive trees grow on these hills."[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 296
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 24
  3. ^ a b c Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 57
  4. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xx, village #341. Also gives the cause for depopulation
  5. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 154
  6. ^ Guérin, 1869, p. 322
  7. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1883, III:25. Quoted in Khalidi, 1992, p. 296
  8. ^ Barron, 1923, Table V, Sub-district of Hebron, p. 10
  9. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 20
  10. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 102
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 152
  12. ^ Khalidi, 1992, p. 297

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]