Jason Brown (figure skater)

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Jason Brown
Full nameJason Lawrence Brown
Born (1994-12-15) December 15, 1994 (age 29)
Los Angeles, California
Height1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Figure skating career
Country United States
CoachBrian Orser
Tracy Wilson
Skating clubSkokie Valley FSC
Began skating1999
Highest WS4th (2020–21)
Medal record
Representing  United States
Figure skating
Olympic Games
Bronze medal – third place 2014 Sochi Team
Four Continents Championships
Silver medal – second place 2020 Seoul Singles
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Taipei Singles
World Junior Championships
Silver medal – second place 2013 Milan Singles
Bronze medal – third place 2012 Minsk Singles
Junior Grand Prix Final
Gold medal – first place 2011–12 Quebec Singles

Jason Lawrence Brown (born December 15, 1994) is an American figure skater. He is a nine-time Grand Prix medalist, a two-time Four Continents medalist (2020 silver, 2018 bronze), and the 2015 U.S. national champion. Earlier in his career, he became a two-time World Junior medalist (2013 silver, 2012 bronze), the 2011 Junior Grand Prix Final champion, and the 2010 junior national champion.

At only 19, Brown won a bronze medal in the team event at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, becoming one of the youngest male figure skating Olympic medalists.

Personal life[edit]

Brown was born on December 15, 1994, in Los Angeles, California.[1] His mother, Marla (Kell), is a television producer, and his father, Steven Brown, works for a lighting company.[2][3][4] He has an older sister, Jordan, and a younger brother, Dylan.[2][5] He is Jewish and celebrated his bar mitzvah in 2007.[2][4][6]

Brown graduated from Highland Park High School and received the Ralph Potter Memorial Award for Exceptional Ability and Achievement and the President's Education Award for Outstanding Academic Excellence.[2] In 2013, he enrolled at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs.[7] He plays piano.[8]

Brown also understands and speaks Japanese.[9]

He came out as gay via Instagram post on June 11, 2021.[10]

Career[edit]

Early years[edit]

Brown began skating at age three and a half when his mother enrolled him and his sister in Learn to Skate classes.[11][12] Coached by Kori Ade since the age of five,[5][13] he trained at various rinks in the Chicago area until April 2013.[12][14] Since 2009, his programs have been choreographed mainly by Rohene Ward.[12][15] Brown also skated pairs with Thea Milburn for three years.[11]

At 11, Brown won the national juvenile title.[16] He won the bronze medal on the novice level at the 2009 U.S. Championships. Competing on the junior level at the 2010 U.S. Championships, he placed second in the short program, 0.07 behind Max Aaron,[17] and second to Joshua Farris in the long program.[18] Brown's overall score was the highest and he won the national junior title.[19]

2010–2011 season[edit]

Brown won the silver medal in his Junior Grand Prix debut in France and placed sixth in his second JGP event in Japan. He finished 9th in his senior national debut at the 2011 U.S. Championships with an impressive performance despite not attempting a triple Axel, which he had decided to put off due to a growth spurt.[20][21] He was assigned to compete at the 2011 World Junior Championships, where he finished 7th. Brown worked on the triple Axel for the following season while adapting to another growth spurt.[22] He stopped wearing hinge boots.[23]

2011–2012 season[edit]

Brown began his season with a win at his first Junior Grand Prix event in Brisbane, Australia.[24][25] He then took silver in Milan, Italy, to qualify for the final. In a December 2011 interview, Brown said that he needed the triple Axel to be competitive on the senior level and continued to work on it.[8] He occasionally used Dartfish, a computer imaging system, and a harness.[26] At the Junior Grand Prix Final, Brown was second in both segments and won the gold medal overall.[27] Brown was assigned to the 2012 World Junior Championships and won the bronze medal.

2012–2013 season[edit]

Brown won gold and silver medals on the JGP series and qualified for his second JGP Final, where he finished fourth. He placed eighth at the 2013 U.S. Figure Skating Championships. He was sent to the 2013 World Junior Championships, where he placed third in the short program and first in the free skate after landing two triple Axels for the first time in his career. Brown won the silver medal while fellow Americans Joshua Farris and Shotaro Omori took the gold and bronze medals, respectively.[28]

2013–2014 season[edit]

Jason Brown during the exhibition gala at the 2013 Trophée Éric Bompard

In May 2013, Brown and his coach, Kori Ade, moved to the Colorado Sports Center in Monument, Colorado.[14][29] His secondary coaches included Eddie Shipstad and Ryan Jahnke.[14][30]

Brown won the silver medal in his senior international debut at the 2013 Nebelhorn Trophy in Oberstdorf, Germany. On September 30, 2013, he was called up to replace Evan Lysacek at Skate America after the latter withdrew due to injury.[31] Brown finished fifth at the event, his first senior Grand Prix event. In November 2013, he competed at a Grand Prix event in Paris, the 2013 Trophée Éric Bompard, and won the bronze medal. He also attracted much attention from the skating public and the French in particular, becoming a crowd favorite.

At the U.S. Championships in January 2014, Brown placed third in the short program and first in the free skate with his Riverdance program, which became a viral video garnering more than 4 million hits. He won the silver medal and was named in the U.S. team to the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.[32][33][34] In Sochi, while Jeremy Abbott skated the short program in the team event, Brown was assigned to the free program and placed fourth. He and team USA were awarded the bronze medal.[1] In the singles event, he was in sixth place after the short program but less than a point off third. He placed eleventh in the free skate and finished ninth overall.[35] At the end of the season, he performed in twelve Stars on Ice shows before returning to training.[36]

2014–2015 season[edit]

Brown began the 2014–15 season at the 2014 Nebelhorn Trophy, an ISU Challenger Series event, and won the gold medal after placing first in both programs. At 2014 Skate America, he came in second. He placed fifth at 2014 Rostelecom Cup with a personal best in the free skate of 159.24 points. His placements earned him 7th place in the Grand Prix series, just missing the cut for the final.

At the 2015 U.S. Championships, Brown won the short program with the second-highest points in the U.S. Championships' history.[37] He finished the free skating second and won his first U.S. title.[38][39] Until then, he had not tried a quad jump in competition.[40] At the 2015 Four Continents Championships, he tried a quad jump in the short program, placing ninth.[41] In the free skate, he set his personal best and finished sixth overall.[42]

Brown placed fourth overall at the 2015 World Figure Skating Championships, placing sixth in the short program and fifth in the free skate. At the 2015 ISU World Team Trophy, he placed second overall to contribute to Team USA's gold medal.

2015–2016 season[edit]

Brown began his season by winning the gold medal at 2015 Ondrej Nepela Trophy. At his first Grand Prix event of the season, 2015 Skate America, he won the bronze medal after placing eighth in the short program and third in the free skate. He then won the silver medal at 2015 CS Ice Challenge. Brown withdrew from the 2015 NHK Trophy due to a back injury.[43] He returned to the ice two weeks later, but the injury resurfaced and forced him to withdraw from the 2016 U.S. Championships.[44] On January 22, NBC Sports reported that he had petitioned U.S. Figure Skating for a spot on the world team despite his inability to compete at the national championships. His petition cited his world ranking, international experience, and competitive record. The USFSA denied his petition and named Adam Rippon, Max Aaron, and Nathan Chen, whom Grant Hochstein later replaced due to injury.[45][46]

Brown ended his season at the 2016 Team Challenge Cup. He placed second in the third short program group and second in the free skate.[29][47]

2016–2017 season[edit]

Brown began his season at 2016 Lombardia Trophy, where he won the silver medal after placing second in the short program and first in the free skate. At the 2016 U.S. International Classic, he won the gold medal after placing second in the short program and first in the free skate.

Brown placed third in the short program at the 2016 Skate America.[48] During the free skate, he performed a quad toe loop which was deemed underrotated by the technical panel. He finished second in the free skate, earning the silver medal behind Shoma Uno.[49] He placed eighth in the short program and seventh in the free skate to place seventh overall at the 2016 NHK Trophy.

On December 16, 2016, Brown was diagnosed with a stress fracture in his right fibula.[50][51][52] He received the bronze medal at the 2017 U.S. Championships.

He placed sixth overall at the 2017 Four Continents Championships after placing ninth in the short program and sixth in the free skate. At the 2017 World Championships, he placed seventh overall after placing eighth in the short program and seventh in the free skate.

At 2017 World Team Trophy, Brown placed 6th overall to contribute to Team USA's bronze medal.

2017–2018 season[edit]

Brown began his season by winning the silver medal at 2017 Lombardia Trophy.

Brown won silver at the 2017 Skate Canada International after placing third in the short program and second in the free skate. At the 2017 NHK Trophy, he ranked third in the short program but ended the competition in fourth place. As a result, he finished as the first alternate for the Grand Prix Final. Although he had tied with Jin Boyang at 22 points, Jin won the tiebreaker by scoring 3.34 points higher than Brown. After Jin's withdrawal, Brown was called up to compete at his first senior-level Grand Prix Final. He finished 6th at the event in Nagoya, Japan.

In January, Brown finished sixth at the 2018 U.S. Championships after placing third in the short program and sixth in the free skate. U.S. Figure Skating named him as first alternate for the 2018 Winter Olympics.[53] He was assigned to the 2018 Four Continents Championships in Taipei, Taiwan. Ranked fourth in the short and third in the free, he won the bronze medal, achieving his first podium finish at a senior-level ISU Championship.

In late May 2018, Brown announced his decision to leave his coaching team in Colorado and move to Brian Orser, Tracy Wilson, Karen Preston, and Lee Barkell at the Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club in Toronto, Canada. Brown and Orser stated that Kori Ade would remain an influence on Brown's career.[54][55][56]

2018–2019 season[edit]

At his first event of the season, the 2018 CS Autumn Classic International, Brown placed third in the short program, fifth in the free program, and fourth overall. He placed eleventh in the short program at 2018 Skate Canada International after underrotating and falling on his triple Axel and underrotating his triple Lutz-double toe loop combination. He fared better in the free skate, where he placed sixth, moving to sixth place overall. At the 2018 Internationaux de France, he placed second overall after winning the short program with a then-personal best score of 96.41 and placed third in the free program. Competing at a second Challenger event, the 2018 CS Golden Spin, he won the gold medal after placing second in the short program and first in the free skate.[57]

At the 2019 US Championships, he won the bronze medal after placing second in the short program and third in the free skate.[58]

At the 2019 Four Continents Championships, Brown placed sixth in the short program and moved up to fifth overall after placing fourth in the free program. In his free skate, Brown avoided popping his opening quad Salchow for the first time that season, though it was deemed underrotated, and he stepped out of the landing.[59]

At the 2019 World Championships, he placed second in the short program, with a new personal best score of 96.81, winning a silver small medal.[60] He placed fourteenth in the free skate after a poor skate and placed ninth overall at the event. He expressed satisfaction with his season overall.[61]

2019–2020 season[edit]

While traveling to a U.S. Figure Skating training camp in August 2019, the car Brown was traveling in was impacted by another vehicle, as a result of which Brown sustained a concussion. Restricted from training, Brown withdrew from the 2019 CS Nebelhorn Trophy.[62] He was cleared to compete at 2019 Skate America, his first Grand Prix of the season. Brown popped his planned triple Axel to a single in the short program, placing fourth in that segment.[63] In the free skate, Brown performed all his jumps successfully other than doubling a planned triple loop, placing second in that segment to take the silver medal.[64] At the 2019 NHK Trophy, Brown placed eighth in the short program and fourth in the free skate to place fifth overall. Two weeks later, he won the gold medal at 2019 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb.

Brown won the silver medal at the 2020 U.S. Championships after placing second in both segments. In the free skate, he attempted a quad toe loop, which was downgraded but landed without program interruption.[65]

At the 2020 Four Continents Championships, Brown placed third in the short program with a clean skate, defeating several skaters who performed at least one quadruple jump.[66] In the free skate, Brown doubled an attempted quad toe loop but landed all his other jumps successfully and placed second in the segment with a new personal best of 180.11, moving into second place overall.[67] He was assigned to compete at the World Championships in Montreal, Canada, but it was cancelled as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.[68]

2020–2021 season[edit]

Brown was assigned to compete at the 2020 Skate Canada International, but the event was also canceled due to the pandemic.[69]

As a result, Brown made his season debut at the 2021 U.S. Championships in Las Vegas, placing third in the short program with a clean skate.[70] In the free skate, he fell on a quad toe loop that was also deemed underrotated and singled a planned triple Axel, placing fourth in that segment, but remained in third place overall and won the bronze medal. He was named to the American team for the 2021 World Championships in Stockholm, Sweden.[71]

Brown placed seventh in the short program at the World Championships with a clean skate.[72] Brown attempted a quad Salchow in the free skate, but it was deemed underrotated. Making one other minor jump error, he placed eighth in that segment and remained seventh overall.[73] Brown and Nathan Chen's placements at the World Championships were sufficient to qualify at least two berths for American men at the 2022 Winter Olympics, but only the possibility of a third because Vincent Zhou failed to qualify for the free skate.[72][74]

Brown competed at the 2021 World Team Trophy, where he served as team captain and helped Team USA win the silver medal. He placed third in the short program and eighth in the free skate, with his total score ranking sixth among the men.[75]

2021–2022 season[edit]

Brown made his season debut at the 2021 CS Finlandia Trophy, winning the gold medal.[76] Returning to the Grand Prix, he took the silver medal at the 2021 Skate Canada International to start. He said he was "a little disappointed" with the free skate after two jump errors but overall was satisfied with his result.[77] Brown went on to place third in the short program and fourth in the free skate at the 2021 Internationaux de France, winning the bronze medal and thus medaling at both of his Grand Prix events for the first time in his career.[78] Attempting a quad Salchow in the free skate, he two-footed the landing but was credited with full rotation for the first time.[79] Brown's results qualified him to the Grand Prix Final, but it was subsequently canceled due to restrictions prompted by the Omicron variant.[80]

Traveling to attend the 2022 U.S. Championships with coach Tracy Wilson proved to be an odyssey for Brown due to five different flight cancellations that had him in transit for thirty-three hours, culminating in a rental car trip from Atlanta to Nashville.[81] Despite this, he skated a clean short program and placed fourth in that segment, narrowly behind third-place Ilia Malinin. On the morning of the free skate, Wilson tested positive for COVID and could not accompany him to the event; Brown tested negative the same day.[81] In the free skate, he fell on his opening quad Salchow attempt but landed the rest of his jumps. Normally regarded as one of the best spinners in the world, on one of his three free skate spins, he lost two levels, which made the difference between third and fourth overall as he finished 0.38 points behind bronze medalist Vincent Zhou.[82] Per the selection criteria for the American Olympic team, Zhou and national champion Nathan Chen were guaranteed berths, with the third to be decided between Brown and 17-year-old surprise silver medalist Ilia Malinin. The committee ultimately chose Brown.[83][84] On Malinin, he said, "there's nothing I can say that can encompass how he might be feeling at this moment. What I can say is he is beyond out of this world, and U.S. figure skating is so lucky to have such a bright future with Ilia."[85] For his part, Brown said that it had been "a really tough go to get here. Not just in the last 72 hours, but in the last four years and everything leading up to this point and me kind of turning a page after 2018."[82]

Competing at the 2022 Winter Olympics in the men's event, Brown skated a clean short program and placed sixth with a new personal best score of 97.24. He said it was "a long time coming," noting that it had taken "eight years trying to get back to this stage to be able to put out a performance like that."[86] In the free skate, he elected not to attempt a quadruple jump and skated a nearly clean program, with the lone error being a doubled attempt at a triple Salchow. He finished sixth in that segment as well, remaining sixth overall.[87]

2022–2023 season[edit]

Brown, by his own later admission, had not intended to compete further following the Olympic season, and moved out of his longtime Toronto apartment to relocate back to the United States. However, after accepting an invitation to compete at the Japan Open in the fall, he prepared a new free skate to "The Impossible Dream" from Man of La Mancha. He placed fifth at the Japan Open, and found his competitive drive reawakened by the experience, at which point he decided to return for the second half of the season starting with the national championships.[88]

At the 2023 U.S. Championships in San Jose, Brown placed second in the short program, 10.11 points behind favorite Ilia Malinin.[89] He was third in the free skate, fractionally behind Andrew Torgashev and Malinin, but won the silver medal. Brown said that he felt he had faced down "demons" by competing successfully in San Jose, the site of his failure to qualify for the 2018 Olympic team that he personally considered the low point of his career.[90]

Brown finished sixth in the short program at the 2023 World Championships in Saitama.[91] A clean free skate saw him earn a personal best 185.87 score, coming fifth in that segment and rising to fifth place overall. He described himself as "really touched" to be there, as he had not anticipated it at the start of the year. He remained in Japan for Stars on Ice shows in advance of the 2023 World Team Trophy.[92] Brown captained Team USA at the World Team Trophy, coming fourth in the short program and third in the free skate, while the team won the gold medal. It was his second championship at the event.[93][94]

2023–2024 season[edit]

Brown again began his season at the Japan Open, coming fifth in the men's segment while Team North America won the silver medal.[95]

Programs[edit]

Brown at the 2018 Internationaux de France
Brown at the 2018 Internationaux de France
Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2023–2024
[96][97]

2022–2023
[98][88]
2021–2022
[99]
2020–2021
[100]
2019–2020
[101]
2018–2019
[102][103]
2017–2018
[106][107][108][109]



2016–2017
[112][113][114]


2015–2016
[117][118][119][47]


  • Canned Heat
    by Jamiroquai

2014–2015
[121]
  • Hip hop mix

2013–2014
[15][122][123]
2012–2013
[124][125]

2011–2012
[11][26]
  • Grand Guignol
    by Bajofondo Tango Club
    choreo. by Rohene Ward
2010–2011
[126]
  • Baliwood
    by King City
2009–2010
[127]
2008–2009
[127]
2007–2008
[127]

Competitive highlights[edit]

  • GP – Event of the ISU Grand Prix Series
  • CS – Event of the ISU Challenger Series
  • C – Event was cancelled
  • WD – Withdrew from competition
  • At national events in the United States, pewter medals are awarded for fourth place.
  • Medals at team events are awarded for the team result only. Individual placements in team events are listed in parentheses.
Competition placements at senior level [57]
Season 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Winter Olympics 9th 6th
Winter Olympics (Team event) 3rd
(4th)
World Championships 4th 7th WD 9th C 7th 5th TBD
Four Continents 6th 6th 3rd 5th 2nd
GP Final 6th C
GP France 3rd 2nd 3rd
GP NHK Trophy WD 7th 4th 5th
GP Rostelecom Cup 5th
GP Skate America 5th 2nd 3rd 2nd 2nd
GP Skate Canada 2nd 6th C 2nd
CS Autumn Classic 4th
CS Finlandia Trophy 1st
CS Golden Spin of Zagreb 1st 1st WD
CS Ice Challenge 2nd
CS Lombardia Trophy 2nd 2nd
CS Nebelhorn Trophy 2nd 1st WD
CS Nepela Memorial 1st
CS U.S. Classic 1st
CS Warsaw Cup 3rd
Japan Open (Team) 2nd
(6th)
2nd
(5th)
Team Challenge Cup 1st
(2nd)
World Team Trophy 1st
(2nd)
3rd
(6th)
2nd
(6th)
1st
(4th)
U.S. Championships 2nd 1st WD 3rd 6th 3rd 2nd 3rd 4th 2nd 2nd
Competition placements at junior level [127]
Season 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13
World Junior Championships 7th 3rd 2nd
JGP Final 1st 4th
JGP Australia 1st
JGP France 2nd 2nd
JGP Italy 2nd
JGP Japan 6th
JGP Turkey 1st
Gardena Spring Trophy 1st
U.S. Championships 3rd N 1st J 9th S 9th S 8th S

Detailed results[edit]

From left to right: the 2013 Trophée Eric Bompard podium, the 2014 Skate America podium, and the 2015 Skate America podium
From left to right: the 2016 Skate America podium, the 2017 Skate Canada International podium, and the 2018 Internationaux de France podium
ISU personal best scores in the +5/-5 GOE system 
Segment Type Score Event
Total TSS 281.24 2022 Winter Olympics
Short program TSS 97.24 2022 Winter Olympics
TES 50.69 2018 Internationaux de France
PCS 47.95 2023 World Team Trophy
Free skating TSS 185.87 2023 World Championships
TES 90.03 2023 World Championships
PCS 96.34 2022 Winter Olympics
ISU personal best scores in the +3/-3 GOE system 
Segment Type Score Event
Total TSS 273.67 2017 World Team Trophy
Short program TSS 94.32 2017 World Team Trophy
TES 48.43 2017 World Team Trophy
PCS 45.89 2017 World Team Trophy
Free skating TSS 182.63 2016 Skate America
TES 92.61 2016 Skate America
PCS 92.08 2017 World Team Trophy

Senior level[edit]

  • Small medals for the short program and free skating are only awarded at ISU Championships.
  • At national events in the United States, pewter medals are awarded for fourth place.
  • Medals at team events are awarded for the team result only. The individual placement at the ISU World Team Trophy is listed in parentheses.
Results in the 2010–11 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Jan 22–30, 2011 United States 2011 U.S. Championships 11 64.32 7 144.44 9 208.76
Results in the 2011–12 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Jan 22–29, 2012 United States 2012 U.S. Championships 7 75.68 14 133.48 9 209.16
Results in the 2012–13 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Jan 19–27, 2013 United States 2013 U.S. Championships 7 74.05 8 149.24 8 223.29
Results in the 2013–14 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 26–28, 2013 Germany 2013 Nebelhorn Trophy 2 79.41 2 149.02 2 228.43
Oct 17–20, 2013 United States 2013 Skate America 2 83.78 6 147.25 5 231.03
Nov 15–17, 2013 France 2013 Trophée Éric Bompard 3 84.77 3 158.32 3 243.09
Jan 5–12, 2014 United States 2014 U.S. Championships 3 87.47 1 182.61 2 270.08
Feb 6–9, 2014 Russia 2014 Winter Olympics (Team event) 4 153.67 3
Feb 7–23, 2014 Russia 2014 Winter Olympics 6 86.00 11 152.37 9 238.37
Results in the 2014–15 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 24–27, 2014 Germany 2014 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 1 83.59 1 153.38 1 237.17
Oct 24–26, 2014 United States 2014 Skate America 3 79.75 3 154.42 2 234.17
Nov 14–16, 2014 Russia 2014 Rostelecom Cup 7 76.32 4 159.24 5 235.56
Jan 18–25, 2015 United States 2015 U.S. Championships 1 93.36 2 181.62 1 274.98
Feb 9–15, 2015 South Korea 2015 Four Continents Championships 9 75.86 6 167.35 6 243.21
Mar 23–29, 2015 China 2015 World Championships 6 84.32 5 163.97 4 248.29
Apr 16–19, 2015 Japan 2015 World Team Trophy 3 86.38 2 176.69 1 (2) 263.17
Results in the 2015–16 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 1–3, 2015 Slovakia 2015 CS Ondrej Nepela Trophy 2 76.98 1 162.39 1 239.37
Oct 23–25, 2015 United States 2015 Skate America 8 78.64 3 159.83 3 238.47
Oct 27–31, 2015 Austria 2015 Ice Challenge 1 85.29 4 155.36 2 240.65
Apr 22–24, 2016 United States 2016 Team Challenge Cup 2 87.72 1 155.36 1 268.72
Results in the 2016–17 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 8–11, 2016 Italy 2016 CS Lombardia Trophy 2 81.58 1 174.91 2 256.49
Sep 14–18, 2016 United States 2016 CS U.S. Classic 2 83.18 1 170.86 1 254.04
Oct 21–23, 2016 United States 2016 Skate America 3 85.75 2 182.63 2 268.38
Nov 25–27, 2016 Japan 2016 NHK Trophy 8 74.33 7 144.14 7 218.47
Jan 14–22, 2017 United States 2017 U.S. Championships 4 79.23 3 175.00 3 254.23
Feb 15–19, 2017 South Korea 2017 Four Continents Championships 9 80.77 6 165.08 6 245.85
Mar 29 – Apr 2, 2017 Finland 2017 World Championships 8 93.10 7 176.47 7 269.57
Apr 20–23, 2017 Japan 2017 World Team Trophy 5 94.32 6 179.35 3 (6) 273.67
Results in the 2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 14–17, 2017 Italy 2017 CS Lombardia Trophy 2 83.01 2 176.87 2 259.88
Oct 27–29, 2017 Canada 2017 Skate Canada International 3 90.71 2 170.43 2 261.14
Nov 10–12, 2017 Japan 2017 NHK Trophy 3 85.36 4 160.59 4 245.95
Dec 7–10, 2017 Japan 2017–18 Grand Prix Final 4 89.02 6 164.79 6 253.81
Dec 29 – Jan 8, 2018 United States 2018 U.S. Championships 3 93.23 6 160.45 6 253.68
Jan 22–28, 2018 Chinese Taipei 2018 Four Continents Championships 4 89.78 3 179.44 3 269.22
Results in the 2018–19 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 20–22, 2018 Canada 2018 CS Autumn Classic International 3 88.90 5 144.33 4 233.23
Oct 26–28, 2018 Canada 2018 Skate Canada International 11 76.46 6 158.51 6 234.97
Nov 23–25, 2018 France 2018 Internationaux de France 1 96.41 3 159.92 2 256.33
Dec 5–8, 2018 Croatia 2018 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb 2 95.50 1 167.92 1 263.42
Jan 19–27, 2019 United States 2019 U.S. Championships 2 100.52 3 172.56 3 273.08
Feb 7–10, 2019 United States 2019 Four Continents Championships 6 86.57 4 172.32 5 258.89
Mar 18–24, 2019 Japan 2019 World Championships 2 96.81 14 157.34 9 254.15
Results in the 2019–20 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 18–20, 2019 United States 2019 Skate America 4 83.45 2 171.64 2 255.09
Nov 22–24, 2019 Japan 2019 NHK Trophy 8 73.73 4 157.54 5 231.27
Dec 4–7, 2019 Croatia 2019 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb 3 79.44 1 162.95 1 242.39
Jan 20–26, 2020 United States 2020 U.S. Championships 2 100.99 2 191.89 2 292.88
Feb 4–9, 2020 South Korea 2020 Four Continents Championships 3 94.71 2 180.11 2 274.82
Results in the 2020–21 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Jan 11–21, 2021 United States 2021 U.S. Championships 3 100.92 4 176.00 3 276.92
Mar 22–28, 2021 Sweden 2021 World Championships 7 91.25 8 170.92 7 262.17
Apr 15–18, 2021 Japan 2021 World Team Trophy 3 94.86 8 160.33 2 (6) 255.19
Results in the 2021–22 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 7–10, 2021 Finland 2021 CS Finlandia Trophy 2 92.39 5 170.13 1 262.52
Oct 29–31, 2021 Canada 2021 Skate Canada International 2 94.00 3 165.55 2 259.55
Nov 19–21, 2021 France 2021 Internationaux de France 3 89.39 4 174.81 3 264.20
Jan 3–9, 2022 United States 2022 U.S. Championships 4 100.84 3 188.94 4 289.78
Feb 8–10, 2022 China 2022 Winter Olympics 6 97.24 6 184.00 6 281.24
Results in the 2022–23 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 8, 2022 Japan 2022 Japan Open 5 163.57 2
Jan 23–29, 2023 United States 2023 U.S. Championships 2 100.25 3 177.06 2 277.32
Mar 20–26, 2023 Japan 2023 World Championships 6 94.17 5 185.87 5 280.04
Apr 13–16, 2023 Japan 2023 World Team Trophy 4 95.61 3 183.43 1 (4) 279.04
Results in the 2023–24 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Oct 7, 2023 Japan 2023 Japan Open 5 144.38 2
Nov 15–17, 2023 Poland 2023 CS Warsaw Cup 4 78.48 2 158.27 3 236.75
Jan 22–28, 2024 United States 2024 U.S. Championships 3 89.02 2 175.48 2 264.50

Junior level[edit]

Results in the 2009–10 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Jan 14–24, 2010 United States 2010 U.S. Championships 2 62.10 2 133.12 1 195.22
Apr 1–3, 2010 Italy 2010 Gardena Spring Trophy 1 68.98 1 128.32 1 197.30
Results in the 2010–11 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Aug 25–28, 2010 France 2010 JGP France 3 58.00 1 122.57 2 180.57
Sep 22–26, 2010 Japan 2010 JGP Japan 4 57.13 7 110.15 6 167.28
Feb 28 – Mar 6, 2011 South Korea 2011 World Junior Championships 7 62.64 6 122.80 7 185.44
Results in the 2011–12 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Sep 8–10, 2011 Australia 2011 JGP Australia 1 68.20 1 129.03 1 197.23
Oct 6–8, 2011 Italy 2011 JGP Italy 2 68.37 2 125.91 2 219.37
Dec 8–11, 2011 Canada 2011–12 JGP Final 2 68.77 2 139.64 1 208.41
Feb 27 – Mar 4, 2012 Belarus 2012 World Junior Championships 4 70.20 3 144.70 3 214.90
Results in the 2012–13 season
Date Event SP FS Total
P Score P Score P Score
Aug 23–25, 2012 France 2012 JGP France 3 59.33 2 126.48 2 185.81
Sep 22–24, 2012 Turkey 2012 JGP Turkey 1 65.95 1 132.21 1 198.16
Dec 6–9, 2012 Russia 2012–13 JGP Final 3 69.43 4 128.89 4 198.32
Feb 25 – Mar 3, 2013 Italy 2013 World Junior Championships 3 70.06 1 154.09 2 224.15

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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    "Earlier versions: 2014–2018". IceNetwork.com. September 10, 2018. Archived from the original on July 1, 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
    "Earlier versions: 2010–2013". September 10, 2018. Archived from the original on June 9, 2013.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)

External links[edit]