Jaune Quick–to–See Smith

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Jaune Quick-to-See Smith
BornJanuary 15, 1940 (1940-01-15)
St. Ignatius Indian Mission, Flathead Reservation, Montana
NationalitySalish-Kootenai, Métis-Cree, Shoshone
EducationFramingham State College, University of New Mexico, Olympic College
Known forPainting, Printmaking
Websitehttp://jaunequick-to-seesmith.com

Jaune Quick–to–See Smith (born 1940), a self-described cultural arts worker, is a Native American visual artist and curator. An enrolled member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Smith is also of Métis and Shoshone descent. She is also an art educator, art advocate, and political activist. Prolific in her long career, her work draws from a Native worldview and comments on American Indian identity, histories of oppression, and environmental issues.

In the mid-1970s, Smith began to gain prominence as a painter and printmaker [2][3], and later she advanced her style and technique with collage, drawing, and mixed media. Her works have been widely exhibited and many are in the permanent collections of prominent art museums in the United States, including the Museum of Modern Art-New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art,[11] the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Walker Art Center as well as the Smithsonian American Art Museum[12] and National Museum of Women in the Arts.[13] Internationally, her work is also included in many private and public collections like The Museum of Mankind (Vienna), The Museum of Modern Art (Quito), the Victoria and Albert Museum (London), the Museum for World Cultures (Frankfurt), and the Museum for Ethnology (Berlin). Finally, her work has been collected by New Mexico Museum of Art (Santa Fe)[14] and Albuquerque Museum,[15] both located in a landscape that has continually served as one of her greatest sources of inspiration. She actively supports the Native arts community by organizing exhibitions and project collaborations, and she has also participated in national commissions for public works.

Smith lives in Corrales, New Mexico, near the Rio Grande and, since 2017, she has been represented by Garth Greenan Gallery in New York.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Jaune Quick–to–See Smith was born on January 15, 1940, in St. Ignatius Mission,[1] a small town on the Flathead Reservation on the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Indian Reservation, Montana. Her first name, Jaune, means "yellow" in French, pointing to her French-Cree ancestry. Her Indian name, "Quick-to-See," was given to her by her Shoshone grandmother as a sign of an ability to grasp things readily.[1]

As a child, Smith had an itinerant life. Her father, a single parent who traded horses and participated in rodeos,[1] frequently moved between several reservations as a horse trader.[2] As a result, Jaune lived in various places of the Pacific Northwest and California.[4] Growing up in poverty,[5] Smith worked alongside migrant workers in a Seattle farming community between the ages of eight and fifteen years old, when school was not in session.[2]

However, Smith knew very early on that she wanted to be an artist. She remembers drawing on the ground with sticks as a four-year old,[4] and in first grade, she recalls the first time she encountered tempera paints and crayons:

I loved the smell of them. It was a real awakening. I made a painting of children dancing around Mount Rainier. My teacher raved about it. Then with Valentine’s Day approaching, I painted red hearts all over the sky. … I see it as my first abstract painting."[2]

Education[edit]

In 1960, Smith began her formal art education in Washington state, earning an Associate of Arts Degree at Olympic College in Bremerton and taking classes at the University of Washington in Seattle. Her education, however, was interrupted because she had to support herself through various jobs as a waitress, Head Start teacher, factory worker, domestic, librarian, janitor, veterinary assistant, and secretary.[4] In 1976, she completed a Bachelors degree in Art Education from Framingham State College, Massachusetts, and then moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, to start graduate school at the University of New Mexico (UNM). Her initial attraction to the University was its comprehensive Native American studies program, but after applying three times and being successively turned down, she decided to continue taking classes and making art.[3] After an eventual exhibition at the Kornblee Gallery in New York City and its review in Art in America, she was finally accepted into the Department of Fine Arts at UNM[3] where in 1980 she graduated with a Masters in Art.[6] This liberal arts education formally introduced her to studies on the classical and contemporary arts, focusing on European and American artistic practices throughout the millennia, which served as her most influential point of access to the contemporary global art world.[9]

From this background of her childhood and formal arts education, Smith has actively negotiated Native and non-Native societies by navigating, merging, and being inspired by diverse cultures. She produces art that "follows the journey of [her] life as [she moves] through public art projects, collaborations, printmaking, traveling, curating, lecturing and tribal activities."[3] This work serves as a mode of visual communication, which she creatively and consciously composes in layers to bridge gaps between these two worlds[5] and to educate about social, political and environmental issues existing deeper than the surface.

Artistic style[edit]

Smith has been creating complicated abstract paintings and lithographs since the 1970s. She employs a wide variety of media, working in painting, printmaking and richly textured mixed media pieces. Such images and collage elements as commercial slogans, sign-like petroglyphs, rough drawing, and the inclusion and layering of text are unusually intersected into a complex vision created out of the artist’s personal experience. Her works contain strong, insistent socio-political commentary that speaks to past and present cultural appropriation and abuse, while identifying the continued significance of the Native American peoples. She addresses today’s tribal politics, human rights and environmental issues with humor. Smith is known internationally for her philosophically centered work regarding her strong cultural beliefs and political activism.[4]

A guest lecturer at over 185 universities, museums and conferences around the world, Smith has also shown her work in over 100 solo exhibitions. Her work has been reviewed by The New York Times, ArtNews, Art In America, Art Forum, The New Art Examiner and many other notable publications. She also organizes and curates numerous Native American exhibitions and serves as an activist and spokesperson for contemporary Native art.

Smith's collaborative public artworks include the terrazzo floor design in the Great Hall of the Denver Airport;[5] an in-situ sculpture piece in Yerba Buena Gardens, San Francisco;[6] and a mile-long sidewalk history trail in West Seattle.[7]

1980s[edit]

Smith's initial mature work consisted of abstract landscapes, begun in the 1970s and carried into the 1980s. Her landscapes often included pictographic symbolism and was considered a form of self-portraiture; Gregory Galligan explains in Arts Magazine in 1986, "each of these works distills decades of personal memory, collective consciousness, and historical awareness into a cogent pictorial synthesis."[8] The landscapes often make use of representations of horses, teepees, humans, antelopes, etc.

These paintings touch on the alienation of the American Indian in modern culture, by acting as a sum of the past and something new altogether.[9] She does this by beginning to saturate her work with the style of Abstract Expressionists. Smith explains, "I look at line, form, color, texture, etc., in contemporary art as well as viewing old Indian artifacts the same way. With this I make parallels from the old world to contemporary art. A Hunkpapa drum become a Rothko painting; ledger-book symbols become Cy Twombly; a Naskaspi bag is Paul Klee; a Blackfoot robe, Agnes Martin; beadwork color is Josef Albers; a parfleche is Frank Stella; design is Vasarely’s positive and negative space."[10]

1990s[edit]

In the 1990s, Smith began her I See Red series, which she has continued on and off through this day. Paintings in this series were initially exhibited at Bernice Steinbaum Gallery in 1992, in conjunction with protests regarding the Columbian quincentenary.[11] As Erin Valentino describes in the Third Text in 1997, "The paintings in this series employ numerous kinds of imagery from an abundance of sources and in a variety of associations: high, mass, consumer, popular, national, mainstream and vernacular cultures, avant-garde (modernist) imagery and so-called Indian imagery in the form of found objects, photographs, scientific illustrations, fabric swatches, bumper stickers, maps, cartoon imagery, advertisements, newspaper cut-outs and visual quotations of her own work, to name some."[11] Here, she juxtaposes stereotypical commodification of native American cultures with visual reminders of their colonizer's legacies.[11] The style of these paintings, with their collage, layered, and misty environments, are reminiscent of that of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, their subject matter reminiscent of Andy Warhol, too.[12]

2000s[edit]

Smith has consistently addressed respect for nature, animals, and human kind.[13] Her interest in these topics lies in her exploration of the adverse sociocultural circumstances created for Native Americans by the government; this umbrella term refers to the health, sovereignty, and rights of Native Americans.[11] She is able to put her studies into practice by avoiding toxic art supplies and minimizing excessive art storage space.[13]

Today, Smith's paintings still contain contemporary cultural signifiers and collaged elements. References to the Lone Ranger, Tonto, Snow White, Altoids, Krispy Kreme, Fritos, etc., all serve to critique the rampant consumerism of American culture, and how this culture benefits off of the exploitation of Native American cultures.[14] She uses humor in a cartoonish way to bemoan the corruption of nature and mock the shallowness of contemporary culture.[14]

Nomad Art Manifesto[edit]

As an active environmentalist, Smith often critiques the pollution created through art-making such as toxic materials, excessive storage space, and extensive shipping. The Nomad Art Manifesto, designed based on the aesthetic of parfleches, it consists of squares carrying messages about the environment and Indian life, made entirely from biodegradable materials.[15]

The Nomad Art Manifesto:

  • Nomad Art is made with biodegradable materials
  • Nomad Art can be recycled
  • Nomad Art can be folded and sent as a small parcel
  • Nomad Art can be stored on a bookshelf, which saves space
  • Nomad Art does not need to be framed
  • Nomad Art is convenient for countries which may be disbanding or reforming
  • Nomad Art is for the new diaspora age.

Awards and honors[edit]

Smith has received attention for her work as an artist, educator, art advocate, and political activist throughout her career and she has received multiple honors, awards and fellowships.

Smith has been awarded several honorary degrees. These include doctorates in art granted by the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1992, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 1998, Massachusetts College of Art in 2003, and UNM in 2008;[7] a professorship in art by Washington University in Saint Louis in 1989; and, a degree in Native American Studies by Salish Kootanai College, Pablo, Montana in 2015.[8]

Among lifetime achievement awards acknowledging dedication to her career, she has received the Women’s Caucus for Art Award in the Visual Arts in 1997, the College Art Association Committee on Women in the Arts Award in 2002, and the Woodson Foundation Award in 2014 as well as being inducted into the National Academy of Art in 2011. She has also been the recipient of the Women’s Vision Award for the National Women’s History Project in Women’s Art in 2008 and the Visionary Woman Award from Moore College of Art & Design in 2011. Other notable awards throughout the years have been the Wallace Stegner Award for art of the American West in 1995, the Joan Mitchell Foundation Award in 1996 to archive her work through the Painters Grant, the Eiteljorg Museum Fellowship for Native American Fine Art in its inaugural year of 1999, ArtTable award in 2011, and the Switzer Distinguished Artist Award in 2012.

Her adoptive state of New Mexico has also lauded her contribution to the arts and local community with praise and continuous recognition over the decades. This began early in her state residency (with her first career honor) when she was named one of "80 Professional Women to Watch in the 1980s" by New Mexico Women’s Political Caucus for her local civic engagement in 1979. Subsequent esteemed credits of distinction are: SITE Santa Fe fellowship award in 1995; the New Mexico Governor’s Outstanding New Mexico Woman’s Award and the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts (Allan Houser Memorial Award) both in 2005; the Living Artist of Distinction award by the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in 2012;[26] the aforementioned doctorate from UNM in Albuquerque and the Woodson Foundation award in Santa Fe. Smith was also admitted to the New Mexico Women’s Hall of Fame in 2014.

Exhibitions[edit]

Recent solo exhibitions include: 2015: "Art After the Drought"[16] at the Museum of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, TX; 2014: "Water and War" at the Bernstein Gallery in The Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University;[17] "Artists and Arts Workers" in the Robert E. Elberson Fine Arts Center at Salem College,[18] and an exhibit at the Maudeville Art Gallery[19] at Union College in Schenectady, NY. 2013: "Water and War" at the Accola Griefen Gallery in New York City.[20]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

1978

  • Clarke Benton Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1979

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Kornblee Gallery, New York, November–December 1

1980

  • Galleria de Cavallino, Venice, Italy
  • Marilyn Butler Fine Art, Scottsdale, Arizona, October 1–25

1983

  • Galerie Akmak, Berlin, Germany
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Marilyn Butler Fine Art, Santa Fe, July

1984

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, New York, February

1985

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Marilyn Butler Fine Art, Santa Fe, August 14–September 4

1986

  • Speaking Two Languages, Yellowstone Art Center, Billings, Montana
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, New York, November

1987

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Marilyn Butler Fine Art, Scottsdale, Arizona, February 5–21

1988

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Marilyn Butler Fine Art, Scottsdale, Arizona, August

1989

  • Centric 37: Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach, October 3–29

1990

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: New Paintings, Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, New York, February–March 6
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, LewAllen/Butler Fine Art, Santa Fe, August 17–September 7

1992

  • The Quincentenary Non-Celebration, Steinbaum Krauss Gallery, New York
  • LewAllen Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1993

  • Parameters Series, Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia, Parameters Series; Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Steinbaum Krauss Gallery, New York
  • Sweet Briar College, Virginia

1994

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Jan Cicero Gallery, Chicago, November 26
  • SITE, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1995

  • Steinbaum Krauss Gallery, New York
  • Wabash College Art Museum, Crawfordsville, Indiana

1996–1998

  • Subversions/Affirmations: Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, A Survey, Jersey City Museum, New Jersey, December 11, 1996 – February 15, 1997; Lehigh University Art Galleries, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, April 9–June 14, 1997; Austin Museum of Art at Laguna Gloria, Austin, August 2–October 12, 1997; Missoula Art Museum, Montana, December 12, 1997 – February 15, 1998

1997

  • Modern Times, New Mexico State University Art Gallery, Las Cruces
  • The Evergreen State College Galleries, Olympia, Washington

1998

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Sacred Circle Gallery of American Indian Art, Daybreak Star Cultural Arts Center, Dsicovery Park, Seattle, June 1–August 31
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Steinbaum Krauss Gallery, New York

1999

  • Bethel College, St. Paul, Minnesota
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Bush Barn Art Center, Salem, Oregon, August 30–September 30

2000

  • New Work, Jan Cicero Gallery, Chicago
  • Art Museum of Missoula, Montana

2001

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Poet in Paint, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York, Purchase, January 21–May 20
  • Anton Gallery, Washington, D.C.
  • The Longwood Center for the Visual Arts, Longwood College, Farmville, Virginia
  • Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo

2002

  • Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
  • Jan Cicero Gallery, Chicago
  • 200 Years: Change/No Change, Palmer Museum, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

2003

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, Belger Arts Center for Creative Studies, University of Missouri, Kansas City; University of Scranton, Pennsylvania
  • LewAllen Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

2003-2009

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, Belger Arts Center for Creative Studies, University of Missouri, Kansas City, April 5–June 27, 2003; University of Scranton, Pennsylvania, 2003; Milton Hershey School Art Museum, Hershey, Pennsylvania, 2004; Keene State College, Keene, New Hampshire, September 7, 2004; Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, Florida, July 30–October 9, 2005; Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, 2005–January 29, 2006; University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque, 2005; Montclair Museum, Montclair, New Jersey, September 17, 2006 – January 14, 2007; Plains Art Museum, Fargo, North Dakota, 2007; Lauren Rogers Museum, Laurel, Mississippi, February 4–April 29, 2007; The Grace Museum, Abilene, Texas, 2008; Pensacola Art Museum, Florida, 2009

2004

  • Continuum 12 Artists, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian, New York
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, Milton Hershey School Art Museum, Hershey, Pennsylvania; Keene State College, Keene, New Hampshire

2004-2005

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Postmodern Messenger, Tucson Museum of Art, Arizona, October 16, 2004 – January 9, 2005

2005

  • Connections: Old Work/New Work, Flomenhaft Gallery, New York
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, Florida; Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas; University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque

2005-2006

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: She Paints the Horse, Nicolaysen Art Museum, Casper, Wyoming, April 2–July 3, 2005; Ft. Collins Museum of Contemporary Art, Colorado, September 27, 2005 – January 21, 2006


2006

  • New Drawings: Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Suffolk University, Boston
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: New Paintings, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, Georgia
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, Montclair Museum, Montclair, New Jersey; Plains Art Museum, Fargo, North Dakota

2007

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, Lauren Rogers Museum, Laurel, Mississippi
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Paintings, Drawings and Prints, Ellen Noel Museum, Odessa, Texas
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Muscarelle Museum, College of William; Mary, Jamestown, Virginia

2008

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, The Grace Museum, Abilene, Texas
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, North Carolina

2009

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Made in America, Pensacola Art Museum, Florida

2012

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Landscapes of an American Modernist, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, New Mexico, January 12–April 29
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Anna Lamar Switzer Center for the Visual Arts, Pensacola State College, Florida, January 23–March 9

2013

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Water and War, Accola Griefen Gallery, New York

2014

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, The Bernstein Gallery, The Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, New Jersey
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Robert E. Elberson Fine Arts Center, Salem College, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Maudeville Art Gallery, Union College, Schenectady, New York

2015

  • CUE Foundation 2016 Solo Exhibition Program, New York
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Art after the Drought, Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas

2016

  • Layered Stories: Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Holter Museum of Art, Helena, Montana

2017-2019

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: In the Footsteps of My Ancestors, Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana, March 23–July 16, 2017; Missoula Art Museum, Montana, September 20, 2017 – March 10, 2018; Loveland Museum, Colorado, June 30–September 16, 2018; Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado College, October 27, 2018 – January 27, 2019; Tacoma Art Museum, Washington, Spring 2019

2018

  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith: Making Medicine, Garth Greenan Gallery, New York, April 12–May 19

Group exhibitions[edit]

1976

  • Whittemore Gallery, Framingham State College, Massachusetts

1977

  • Arthur B. Mazmanian Gallery, Framingham State College, Massachusetts

1978

  • New Mexico Museum of Fine Arts Biennial, New Mexico Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe
  • Indian Art Now, Wheelwright Museum, Santa Fe, New Mexico

1979

  • Fall Invitational, Roswell Museum, Roswell, New Mexico
  • Grey Canyon Artists, Upstairs Gallery, Berkeley, California
  • Rick Dillingham and Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Clarke-Benton, Santa Fe, July
  • Group Show, Clarke-Benton, Santa Fe, August
  • Summer Show, Droll/Kolbert Gallery, New York

1979–1980

  • Imagery of the Plains: R. Lee White and Jaune Quick–to–See Smith, Heard Museum, December 15, 1979 – January 24, 1980

1980

  • Cavallino Gallery, Venice, Italy
  • Three Visions, Massachusetts College of Art, Boston
  • Work From the Tamarind Institute, Scottish Arts Council, Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Buscaglia–Casteliani Gallery, Niagara University, Niagara, New York

1981

  • Rosalind Constable Invites, Sweeney Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico, October
  • An Exhibit of Contemporary Art by Native American Artists, Whitney Gallery of Taos, New Mexico, April
  • Fiber Arts, Banff Center for the Arts, Banff, Alberta, Canada
  • Kornblee Drawing, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut
  • Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York
  • Grey Canyon Group, Heard Museum, February 7–March 22

1982

  • Galleria D’arte L’Argentario, Trento, Italy
  • University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • Aspen Center for the Arts, Aspen, Colorado
  • Works on Paper, Foundations Gallery, New York

1983

  • The New Feminism, curated by Lucy Lippard, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Grey Canyon, Portland Art Museum, Portland
  • Henry Gallery, Seattle, Washington
  • The Horse Show, Robert Freidus Gallery, New York

1983-1984

  • Common Ground, American Indian Community House, New York, May–June 18
  • Second Western States Exhibition/38th Corcoran Biennial of American Painting, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., May 1983; Lakeview Museum of Arts and Sciences, Peoria, Illinois, May 1983; Scottsdale Center for the Arts, Arizona, October 1983; Albuquerque Museum, 1983–1984; Long Beach Museum of Art, California, 1984; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, November 1984

1984

  • East Meets West, Brooklyn Museum, May 13
  • Western States Biennial, Corcoran Art Gallery, Washington, D.C.
  • Expanding Powers, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee; Cal State College, Stanislaus, California
  • Academy of Arts and Letters Group Invitational, New York
  • 36th Annual Exhibition, American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, New York
  • Artists Call – Reconstruction Project, Artists Space, New York

1985

  • Women of the American West, Bruce Museu, Greenwich, Connecticut
  • Twenty-Five Years of Printmaking at Tamarind, University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque
  • Signale, organized by Katrina Hartje, Galerie Akmak, Berlin, Germany
  • Women of Sweetgrass, Cedar and Sage: Contemporary Art by Native American Women, AICH (American Indian Community House Gallery), New York

1986

  • Views Across America, Museum of Modern Art, Art Advisory Service of Gannett Corporation and Pfizer Corporation Headquarters, New York
  • American Women in Art: Works on Paper – An American Album, Nairobi, Kenya
  • In Homage to Anna Mendieta, Zeus-Trabia Galler, New York
  • Visible/Invisible, Palo Alto Cultural Center, California

1987

  • Connections Project/Conexus, Women Artists from Brazil and U.S., Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art, New York
  • 39th Annual Purchase Exhibition, American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, New York

1988

  • Cultural Currents, San Diego Museum of Art
  • Committed to Print, Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • American Herstory: Women and the U.S. Constitution, The Atlanta College of Art Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia

1989

  • Cambridge Multi-Cultural Art Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • The Natural Image: Nature as Image in Contemporary Art, Stamford Museum and Nature Center, Connecticut, March 12–June 4
  • 100 Drawings by Women, Hillwood Art Gallery, Long Island University, New York
  • 41st Annual Academy–Institute Purchase Exhibition, American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, New York
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith and Emma Whitehorse, Marilyn Butler Fine Art, Scottsdale, February 28

1990

  • Menagerie, Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • The Decade Show, The New Museum of Contemporary Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art, New York
  • The Matter at Hand: Contemporary Drawings, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, Fine Arts Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Coast to Coast–The Box Show, Art in General, New York

1991

  • Figuration, The Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • Presswork: The Art of Women Printmakers, Lang Communications Collection, London
  • Myth and Magic in the Americas, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey, Mexico
  • Okanta, A-Space, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

1992

  • Counter Colonialismo, Center Cultural Tijuana, Mexico; Centro Cultural de la Raza, San Diego
  • 44th Annual Exhibit, American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, New York
  • One World, Kassel, Germany
  • Columbus Drowning, Rochdale Art Gallery, England
  • Wind and Glacier Voices: The Native American Film & Media Celebration, Lincoln Center, New York
  • Six Directions, Galerie Calumet, Heidelberg, Germany

1992–1993

  • In Plural America: Contemporary Journeys, Voices and Identities, Hudson River Museum of Westchester, Yonkers, October 2, 1992 – January 24, 1993

1993

  • Current Identities: Recent Painting in the United States, organized by Aljira: A Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, New Jersey
  • For the Seventh Generation: Native Americans Counter the Quncentennary, Columbus, New York; Art in General, New York
  • Indianer Nordamerikas, Kunst und Mythos, Internationale Tage Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany
  • Art and Environment: Imagine Celebrates Earth Day, National Arts Club, New York
  • Jaune Quick–to–See Smith and David Johns, Works on Paper, Peiper-Riegraf Gallery, Frankfurt, Germany
  • Indian Territories: 20th-Centry Native-American Artists Dismantle 19th-Century Euro-American Myths, René *Fotouhi Fine Art East, East Hampton, August 30

1994

  • AD*VANCES, Museum of Modern Art, Art Advisory Service for General Electric, New York
  • Reuse / Refuse, Honolulu Academy of the Arts, Hawaii
  • Artistas Contemporaneo de Nueva Mexico, University of Guadalajera, Mexico
  • Multiplicity: A New Cultural Strategy, University of British Columbia, Museum of Anthropology, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Toi te Ao, an Aotearoa World Celebration of Indigenous Art & History, Te Taumata Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Salon de Barbie: A Multi-Media Exhibition, The Kitchen, New York; Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York
  • Weltpremiere: Remember the Earth Whose Skin You Are, Kunsthalle, Bonn, Germany

1994–1996

  • Pintores en grabado, IV Bienal Internacional de Pintura de Cuenca, Panama; Honduras; Salvador; Costa Rica; Ecuador; Columbia; Uragauay; Venezuela; Paraguay; Dominican Republic

1995

  • Art at the Edge: Social Turf, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia
  • Old Glory, New Story: Flagging of the 21st Century, Capp Street Project, San Francisco, California
  • The Stephane Janssen Collection of Contemporary American and European Art: In Memory of R. Michael Johns, Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, The University of Oklahoma, Norman; SITE, Santa Fe, New Mexico
  • Justice/Injustice: Art Against Death, Puffin Room, New York
  • Heroes and Heroines: From Myth to Reality, New Jersey Center for Visual Arts, Summit, New Jersey

1996

  • Brücken und Abgrenzungen: Zeitgenössiche indianische Kunst, Taunua-Sparkasse; Kronberg, Germany; Haus an der Redoute, Bonn Germany; Kaisertrutz, Görlitz, Germany
  • American Kaleidoscope: Themes and Perspectives in Recent Art, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • V Bienal Internacional de Pintura de Cuenca
  • Sniper’s Nest (Collection of Lucy Lippard), Bard College, Hudson, NY

1997

  • New Prints, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Text and Identity, Twelve Women/Twelve Artists, University Art Gallery, Staller Center for the Arts, State University at Stony Brook, New York
  • Real(ist) Women II, Northwood University, West Palm Beach, Florida

1998

  • City Series: Taos, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Iowa
  • National Invitational Works on Paper Exhibition, University of Hawaii, Hilo
  • Mouse: An American Icon, The Alternative Museum, New York
  • Indian Humor, National Museum of the American Indian, New York, May 31–August 2

1999

  • Ceremonial, Eight Native Americans, Venice Biennale, Schola Dei Tiraoro E. Battioro, Venezia, Italy
  • Outward Bound: American Art at the Brink of the Twenty-First Century, Washington D.C.; Vietnam; China; Indonesia; Singapore
  • 23rd International Biennial of Graphic Art, Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • World Views: Maps & Art, Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota
  • Millennium Messages, SITES, Smithsonian
  • Mixed Blessings, Two person, curated by Dorothee Peiper-Riegraf, Amerika Haus, Frankfurt, Germany
  • Contemporary Masters, Eiteljorg Museum, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Indian Reality Today, Westphalian State Museum, Munster, Germany
  • Barbie Doll Show, Walter Phillips Gallery, Banff, Alberta, Canada

2000

  • 5th Triennale Mondiale d’Estampes Petit Format 2000, Chamalieres, France
  • Sharjah Arts Museum, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
  • Tamarind at 40, University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque

2001

  • The View from Here, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia
  • Prints & Prints, Denise Bibro Gallery, New York
  • Passageways: Growing up in the World, Israel

2002

  • Women’s National Art Invitational, Clemson University, South Carolina
  • Unforgettable, Chelsea Studio Gallery, New York; Berliner Kunstproject, Berlin, Germany
  • The Fables of Jean de la Fontaine, Institute for American Universities, Aix-en-Provence, France

2003

  • Off the Press: Re-Contextualizing the Newspaper, Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach, Florida
  • Honorary Degree Exhibit, Massachusetts College of Art, Boston; Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, Rhode Island
  • Cross-Cultural Identities: An Artists Print Exchange Between South America and North America, Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, South Africa

2004

  • The Flag Project, Rubin Museum of Art, New York
  • Newer Genres: Twenty Years of the Rutgers Archives for Printmaking, Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, State University of New Jersey, Rutgers
  • New Editions: Prints for an American Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

2005

  • Artists Interrogate: Race and Identity, Milwaukee Art Museum, Wisconsin

2006

  • The Missing Piece for the Dalai Lama, Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, California; Loyola University, Chicago
  • Chamalieres Carrefour Int'l de L'estampe, French Print Triennial, Clichy, France
  • Lessedra World Art Print, Sofia, Bulgaria

2007

  • Elizabeth Sackler Center for Feminist Art, New York
  • We Are All Knots, National Museum of the American Indian and Art in Embassies, Washington, DC
  • An International Printers Exchange, University of North Florida, Jacksonville
  • Unlimited Boundaries: Dichotomy of Place in Contemporary Native Art, Albuquerque Museum, New Mexico

2008

  • Burning Down the House: Building a Feminist Art Collection, Brooklyn, New York
  • Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate, Holter Museum of Art, Helena, Montana
  • International Print Exhibition, USA and Japan, Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art, Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art, Tokushima Modern Art Museum, Japan
  • The Third Space: Cultural Identity Today, Mead Art Museum, Amherst, Massachusetts
  • The Human Condition: A Multi-Cultural Print Exhibition, Molloy College, Rockville Center, Long Island, New York
  • Print Lovers at Thirty: Celebrating Three Decades of Giving, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri

2009

  • Cuban Biennial, Havana, Cuba
  • Off the Beaten Path: Violence, Women and Art – Art Works for Change, Stenersen Museum, Oslo, Norway
  • Visual Power, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; London, United Kingdom; and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Land/Art, 516 ARTS, Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Unconcquered Imagination, Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum, Clewiston, Florida
  • Favorite Works, Jersey City Museum, New Jersey

2009–

  • Common Ground, Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, New Mexico, June 2009–

2010

  • Violencia Mujer Y Arte, Off the Beaten Path: Violence, Women and Art, Centro Cultural Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico; Museo Universitario del Chopo, Mexico
  • The Human Touch: Selections from the RBC Drain Rauscher Collection, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate, Montana Museum of Art & Culture, University of Montana, and Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana

2011

  • The Narcissism of Minor Differences, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore

Tamarind Touchstones: Fabulous at Fifty, Celebrating Excellence in Fine Art Lithography, Portland Art Museum, Oregon

  • NASA|Art: 50 Years of Exploration, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • Kunst der Indianischen Moderne und Postmoderne aus der Sammlung Peiper-Riegraf, Leon Berg, Germany
  • Montana Women in the Visual Arts, Emerson Center for Arts and Culture, Bozeman, Montana
  • Island Press: Three Decades of Printmaking, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Pressing Ideas: Fifty Years of Women's Lithography from Tamarind, National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.

2012

  • ...As Apple Pie, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
  • Creating a Living Legacy, Cue Foundation Gallery, New York
  • Indianische Moderne – Kunst aus Nordamerika, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Germany
  • Shapeshifting: Transformations in Native American Art, Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts
  • Privacy Please, A.I.R. Gallery, Brooklyn, New York
  • Octopus Dreams, Ekaterinburg Museum, Novosibirsk State Museum, Togliatti Art Museum, Russia; Siberia

2013

  • National Academy Museum & School, New York
  • The Old Becomes the New: New York Contemporary Native American Art and the New York School, Wilmer Jennings Gallery at Kenkeleba, New York
  • Off the Beaten Path: Violence, Women, and Art – Art Works for Change, Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa, and Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa
  • The Map Is Not the Territory, The Jerusalem Fund Gallery, Al Quds, Washington, D.C.

2014

  • Women Only, Flomenhaft Gallery, New York
  • Face to Face, Wall to Wall, Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana
  • Re-Riding History: From the Southern Plains to the Matanzas Bay, Fred Jones Jr. Art Museum, Norman, Oklahoma

2015

  • Marks Made: Prints by American Women Artists from 1960 to Present, Museum of Fine Art, St. Petersburg, Florida
  • The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  • Weaving Past into Present: Experiments in Contemporary Native American Printmaking, International Print Center, New York
  • Octopus Dreams, Funabashi City, Japan

2016

  • Embassy of the United States, Ankara, Turkey
  • The Map Is Not the Territory, Lower Level Gallery, Arab American Museum, Dearborn, Michigan

2016–2018

  • Home: Contemporary Indigenous Artists Responding, Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, Colorado, November 8–November 20, 2016; Sojourner Truth Library, State University of New York at New Paltz, December 4–22, 2017; Pattee Library, University Park, Pennsylvania State University, March 1–August 31, 2018

2017

  • BIG Deal: Sizable Paintings from the Permanent Collection, Palmer Museum of Art, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, September 5–December 17
  • Great Basin Artists, C.N. Gorman Museum, University of California, Davis, April 4–June 16

2017–2018

  • Conversation Pieces: Selection from the Permanent Collection in Dialogue, Plains Art Museum, Fargo, North Dakota, June 29, 2017 – July 29, 2018
  • An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney's Collection, 1940–2017, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, August 18, 2017–April 2018
  • Dress Matters: Clothing as Metaphor, Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block, October 21, 2017 – February 18, 2018

2017–2019

  • Multiple Modernisms, Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia, November 17–January 31, 2019

2018

  • Women with Vision: Masterworks from the Permanent Collection, Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, February 10–May 13, 2018

Collections[edit]

  • Akron Museum of Art, Ohio
  • Albuquerque Museum, New Mexico
  • Arizona State University Art Museum, Phoenix
  • Art in Embassies, Washington, D.C.
  • Autry Museum of the American West, Los Angeles
  • Baltimore Museum of Art
  • Birmingham Museum of Art, Alabama
  • Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cody, Wyoming
  • Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota
  • Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia
  • Colgate University, Hamilton, New York
  • College of Wooster Art Museum, Ohio
  • Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, California
  • Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas
  • Danforth Museum, Framingham, Massachusetts
  • Denver Art Museum, Colorado
  • DePaul Art Museum, DePaul University, Chicago
  • Des Moines Art Center, Iowa
  • Detroit Institute of Arts
  • Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Indianapolis
  • Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University Bloomington
  • Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa
  • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
  • Fort Wayne Museum, Indiana
  • Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, University of Oklahoma, Norman
  • Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe
  • Goshen College, Indiana
  • Heard Museum, Phoenix
  • Hennepin County Library, Minnesota
  • High Museum of Art, Atlanta
  • Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire
  • Indianapolis Museum of Art
  • Jersey City Museum
  • Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Landschaftsverband Westfalen-Lippe Museum für Naturkunde, Münster, Germany
  • Lauren Rogers Museum of Art, New Orleans
  • MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester, New York
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  • Miami Dade College Museum of Art and Design, Florida
  • Midwest Museum of Art, Elkhart, Indiana
  • Mildred Kemper Art Museum, Washington University, St. Louis
  • Milwaukee Art Museum, Wisconsin
  • Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minnesota
  • Missoula Art Museum, Montana
  • Molloy College Gallery, Rockville Centre, New York
  • Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey
  • Muscarelle Museum of Art, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia
  • Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence
  • Museum für Völkerkunde Hamburg, Germany
  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  • Museum of Modern Art, Cuenca, Ecuador
  • Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • Museum of Modern Art, Quito, Ecuasdor
  • National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C.
  • New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe
  • New Orleans Museum of Art
  • Newark Museum, New Jersey
  • Nicolaysen Art Museum, Casper, Wyoming
  • Pensacola Museum of Art, University of West Florida
  • Richard F. Brush Art Gallery, Saint Lawrence University, New York
  • Rockwell Museum, Corning, New York
  • Roswell Museum and Art Center, New Mexico Salish Kootenai College, Pablo, Montana
  • Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts
  • Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.
  • Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Sweet Briar College Gallery, Virginia
  • University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson University of Northern Iowa Gallery of Art, Cedar Falls
  • Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  • Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
  • Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
  • Wichita Art Museum, Kansas
  • Yellowstone Art Center, Billings, Montana

Personal[edit]

Smith's son, Neal Ambrose-Smith, is a contemporary painter, printmaker, sculptor and educator.[21]

Works[edit]

  • Waiting for Rain, 2013, lithograph, 22 x 15 in.
  • Tribal Affiliation, 2005, acrylic, pencil, charcoal and oil on canvas, Denver Art Museum, CO.
  • I See Red, 2004, painting, drawing, and print, 37.6 x 56.8 cm, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Gadfly, 2003, mixed media and oil on canvas, 20 x 16 in.[2]
  • Tribalism, 2003, collage, 12 x 11 in.[2]
  • Untitled, from the portfolio Cross-Cultural Identities, 2003, lithograph, 18 x 12 1/2 in. Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI.
  • The Rancher, 2002, acrylic on canvas,183.5 cm × 122.2 cm (72.2 in × 48.1 in), Hood Museum of Art[22]
  • Tribal Map 2001 #2, 2002.[2]
  • WTC [World Trade Center] Memorial, 2002, paper, graphite, and watercolor, 76.5 x 50.9 cm. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • NDN (for life), 2000, mixed media on canvas, 72 x 48 in. The Rockwell Museum.[23]
  • Not Out of the Woods, 2000, acrylic collage and photography on canvas.[24]
  • Sovereign Nations, 2000, mixed media on canvas, 72 x 48 in.
  • State Names, 2000, oil, collage and mixed media on canvas, 48 x 72 in. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Sticky Mouth, 1998, lithograph, 21.457 x 18.898 in. Missoula Art Museum, MT.
  • Alien Nation, 1996, collograph and lithograph, 33 1/4 x 22 3/4 in. Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI.
  • All American, 1996, woodcut and lithograph, 23 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI.
  • Flathead Vest: Father and Child, 1996, collage/acrylic on canvas, 60.039 x 49.83 in. Missoula Art Museum, MT.
  • I See Red: McFlag, 1996, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 50 in. Garth Greenan Gallery, New York City.
  • I See Red: My Heart Belongs to Daddy, 1996, Mixed media on canvas, 60 x 50 in. Garth Greenan Gallery, New York City.
  • I See Red: Worlds Within Worlds, 1996, Mixed media on canvas, 60 x 50 in. Garth Greenan Gallery, New York City.
  • Not Out of the Woods, 1996, collograph and lithograph, 54 x 34 1/4 in. Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI.
  • Our Communities, 1996, collograph and lithograph, 33 3/4 x 22 5/16 in. Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI.
  • The Sacred, 1996, lithograph, 15 x 11 in. Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI.
  • Worlds Within Worlds, 1996, collograph and lithograph, 53 3/8 x 33 3/4 in. Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, WI.
  • Celebrate 40,000 Years of American Art, 1995, collagraph, 71.38 x 47.40in. Whitney Museum, New York.[25]
  • Coyote Made Me Do It!, 1993, monotype on paper, 41 1/2 x 29 1/2 in. Smith College, MA.
  • Indian Handprint, 1993, monotype on paper, 20.984 x 17.953 in. Missoula, MT.
  • Indian Heart, 1993, lithograph, 30 x 22 in. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Rain II, 1993, monotype on paper, 41 1/2 x 29 1/2 in.
  • I See Red: Indian Hand (Botero), 1993, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 50 in. Garth Greenan Gallery, New York City.
  • I See Red (Snowman), 1992, oil and mixed media collage on canvas, 66 x 50 in.[26][3]
  • The Red Mean: Self-Portrait, 1992, acrylic, newspaper collage, shellac, and mixed media on canvas, 90 x 60 in. Smith College of Art, MA.
  • Trade (Gifts for Trading Land with White People), 1992, oil, mixed media, collage on canvas, objects, 152.4 x 431.8 cm. Chrysler Museum, VA.
  • Bald Eagle, 1991, collaged drawing with paint, 48.5 x 48.5 x 2.5 cm. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Ode to Chief Seattle, 1991, lithograph, 20 x 22 in.
  • Ode to Chief Seattle (State II), 1991, lithograph, 22 x 30 in.
  • Paper Dolls for a Post Columbian World with Ensembles Contributed by US Government, 1991-1992, watercolor, pen, and pencil on photocopy paper, each measuring 17 x 11 in. New Mexico Museum of Art, NM.
  • Peyote, 1991, pastel and pencil on paper, 30 x 42 in. Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, NM.
  • Prince William Sound, 1991, collage, mixed media on paper, 22 x 30 in.
  • Rain, 1991, oil and wax on canvas with silver spoons, 80 x 30 in. Heard Museum, AZ.
  • Sea Otters, 1991, collaged paper, paint an mixed media, 38.1 x 38.1 cm. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Together, 1991, collaged paper, paint an mixed media, 38.1 x 38.1 cm. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Forest, 1990.[3]
  • Starry, Starry Sky, 1990.[3]
  • Gifts of Red Cloth, Montana Memories series, 1989, oil and wax on canvas, 72 x 72 in.
  • Starry Night, 1989, oil on canvas, 72 x 72 in. Destroyed by artist.
  • Sunlit, 1989, oil on canvas, 72 x 72 in.
  • Salish Spring, Montana Memories series, 1988–89, oil and wax on canvas, 60.25 x 50 in. Missoula Art Museum, MT.
  • The Spaniard, Montana Memories series, 1988–89, oil and wax on canvas, 60 x 42 in.
  • Escarpment, 1987, oil on canvas, 66 x 48 in.
  • The Courthouse Steps, 1987, oil on canvas, 72 x 60 in. Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, NM.
  • The Great Divide, 1987, oil on canvas, 72 x 60 in. Saint Paul Travelers, MN.
  • Sunset on the Escarpment, 1987, oil on canvas, 72 x 60 in. Dorothee Peiper-Riegraf, Berlin, Germany.
  • War Zone, 1987, oil on canvas, 72 x 60 in.
  • Georgia on My Mind, 1986, oil on canvas, 64 x 48 in. Yellowstone Art Museum, MT.
  • Herding, 1985, oil on canvas, 66 x 84 in. Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, NM.
  • Untitled, from the portfolio Indian Self-Rule, 1983, color lithograph on paper, 27 1/4 x 19 1/4 in. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Red Lake Series #5, 1981, acrylic paint on canvas, 92 x 122 cm. Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.
  • Untitled, from Wallowa Waterhole series, 1978, pastel on paper, 30 x 22 in.
  • Rain Dance, ink drawing, 12 x 12 in.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fricke, Suzanne. "Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Trade (Gifts for Trading Land with White People)". Khan Academy.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Tarlow, Lois (December 2003). "A Plant Never Sits in Isolation: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith". Art New England: 9.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Ed. Abbot, Lawrence, I Stand in the Center of the Good: Interviews with Contemporary Native American Artists, University of Nebraska Press: Lincoln, 1994.
  4. ^ "Accola Griefen Gallery | Jaune Quick-to-See Smith". accolagriefen.com. Retrieved 6 February 2017.
  5. ^ "Great Hall Floor | Denver International Airport". www.flydenver.com. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  6. ^ "Public Art at Yerba Buena Gardens". Yerba Buena Gardens. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  7. ^ "Art Beat » Weekly Art Hit: 'West Seattle Cultural Trail'". artbeat.seattle.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  8. ^ Galligan, Gregory (1986). "Jaune Quick-To-See Smith: Crossing the Great Divide". Arts Magazine. 60 (5): 54–55.
  9. ^ Galligan, Gregory (1987). "Jaune Quick-To-See Smith: Racing with the Moon". Arts Magazine. 61 (5): 82–83.
  10. ^ Rose, Peter (January 10, 1982). "Eclectic Image-Maker' Paints Contrast". Arizona Republic.
  11. ^ a b c d Valentino, Erin (1997). "Coyote's Ransom". Third Text. 38: 25–37.
  12. ^ Lovell, Charles (2003). Jaune Quick-to-See Smth: Made in America. Kansas City, Missouri: Belger Arts Center for Creative Studies.
  13. ^ a b Farris, Phoebe (2005). "Contemporary Native Amiercan Women Artists: Visual Expressions of Feminism, the Environment, and Identity". Feminist Studies. 13 (1): 95–109.
  14. ^ a b Indyke, Dottie (2003). "Reviews: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith at LewAllen Contemporary". Art News. 102 (4).
  15. ^ Women artists of color : a bio-critical sourcebook to 20th century artists in the Americas. Farris, Phoebe, 1952-. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press. 1999. ISBN 0313303746. OCLC 40193578.
  16. ^ "Texas Tech University :: TechAnnounce". www.techannounce.ttu.edu. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  17. ^ "Jaune Quick-To-See Smith: Water and War". Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  18. ^ "Internationally Renowned Artist Jaune Quick-To-See Smith to Speak at Salem College | Salem College". www.salem.edu. Archived from the original on 2016-03-28. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  19. ^ "Mandeville hosts solo show of Native American visionary". www.union.edu. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  20. ^ "Accola Griefen Gallery | Jaune Quick-to-See Smith". accolagriefen.com. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  21. ^ "Neal Ambrose-Smith". Indian Space Painters. Retrieved 10 May 2011.
  22. ^ "The Rancher". Hood Museum. Dartmouth College. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  23. ^ http://rockwellmuseum.org/exhibits-collections/collections/jaune-quick-to-see-smith/
  24. ^ Cohen, Mark Daniel (April 2001). "Neuberger Museum of Art/Purchase: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: poet in paint". Art New England: 44.
  25. ^ Tremblay, Gail. "Jaune Quick-to-See Smith". Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. Retrieved 31 October 2014.
  26. ^ Kastner, Carolyn (2013). Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: An American Modernist. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press. ISBN 978-0-8263-5389-4.

Further reading[edit]

  • Kastner, Carolyn. (2013) Jaune Quick-To-See Smith : An American Modernist. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press. ISBN 978-0826353894

External links[edit]