Javier Fernández (figure skater)

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Javier Fernández
2015 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final Javier Fernández IMG 9445.JPG
Fernández in 2015
Personal information
Full nameJavier Fernández López
Country representedSpain
Born (1991-04-15) April 15, 1991 (age 27)
Madrid, Spain
Height1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
CoachBrian Orser, Tracy Wilson, Daniel Peinado
Former coachNikolai Morozov, Ivan Saez, Carolina Sanz, Jordi Lafarga
ChoreographerDavid Wilson, Antonio Najarro, Kurt Browning, Geoffrey Tyler
Former choreographerJeffrey Buttle, Nikolai Morozov, Ivan Saez, Carolina Sanz, Corrado Giordani
Skating clubToronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club
Ice Leganes Madrid
Former skating clubSad Majadahonda
Training locationsToronto
Former training locationsMadrid, Hackensack, Daugavpils, Moscow
Began skating1997
World standing5 (2017–18)
3 (2016–17)
2 (2015–16)
2 (2014–15)
4 (2013–14)
4 (2012–13)
11 (2011–12)
21 (2010–11)
29 (2009–10)
47 (2008–09)
107 (2007–08)
Season's bests4 (2017-18)[1]
5 (2016–17)[2]
2 (2015–16)[3]
3 (2014–15)[4]
4 (2013–14)[5]
1 (2012–13)[6]
5 (2011–12)[7]
15 (2010–11)[8]
22 (2009–10)[9]
38 (2008–09)[10]
ISU personal best scores
Combined total314.93
2016 Worlds
Short program109.05
2017 Worlds
Free skate216.41
2016 Worlds

Javier Fernández López (Spanish pronunciation: [xaˈβjeɾ feɾˈnandeθ ˈlopeθ]; born 15 April 1991) is a Spanish figure skater. He is the 2018 Olympic bronze medalist, a two-time World champion (2015, 2016), a six-time consecutive European champion (2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018), a three-time Grand Prix Final medalist (2014–15, 2015–16, 2011–12), and an eight-time Spanish national champion.

He is the second man to break the 100-point barrier in the short program,[11] the 200-point barrier in the long program,[12] and the 300-point barrier in the total score.[13] As of 24 May 2017, he has the second highest personal best scores in both segments and third highest in the combined score.[14][15][16]

Fernández represented Spain at the 2010, 2014 and 2018 Winter Olympics. He is the first skater from Spain to medal at an Olympic Games, ISU Championship or a Grand Prix event.[17][18]

In recognition of his achievements, Fernández received the Gold Medal of the Royal Order of Sports Merit by the Spanish government on 19 April 2016.[19]

Personal life[edit]

Javier Fernández López was born on 15 April 1991 in Madrid.[20] He is the younger of two children born to Enriqueta, a mail carrier, and Antonio, an army mechanic.[21][22] Their father stated, "Between the two children we were spending €450 a month when my earnings were less than €1,500". When Javier went to the United States to train, Antonio took a second job repairing helicopters to cover the expenses.[21] His older sister, Laura, competed in ladies' singles and ice dancing.[23] Fernández intends to become a coach after his competitive skating career ends.[24] He is a fan of Real Madrid C.F..[25]

Fernández relocated to Hackensack, New Jersey in the United States in the late summer of 2008.[22] He moved to Toronto, Ontario, Canada in the summer of 2011.[26][27]

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Fernández started skating at the age of six, after his older sister began taking lessons.[23][28] For a while, he also played soccer, tennis, and ice hockey, but dropped the other sports to focus on skating at age eight.[29] He skated at a small rink in the San Martín district before switching a year later to a rink in Majadahonda.[29] One of his earliest coaches was Carolina Sanz, who stated that he had natural talent but initially lacked discipline.[30][31]

Fernández landed his first triple jump at the age of 12.[23] He had to leave Majadahonda after his sister decided to switch to the Jaca skating club, which offered to cover her costs. The youngest Fernández joined his sister in Jaca six months later.[21]

Fernández began skating in senior events in the 2006–2007 season, but failed to qualify for the free skate at the European Championships and the World Championships in his debut season.

After two years in Jaca, where he had been teased and discouraged by a lack of improvement in his skating, he returned to Madrid and considered switching to hockey.[21]

2008–09 season[edit]

In 2008, Fernández attended a summer camp in Andorra where Russian coach Nikolai Morozov was an instructor.[21][22] Morozov offered to train him in the United States and Fernández quickly agreed.[29][32] Fernández relocated to Hackensack, New Jersey in late summer 2008.[22] Although he shared an apartment with a Spanish coach and Morozov charged him nothing for coaching, his expenses in the United States were between €2,000 and €3,000 a month and he received no financial support from Spain.[21]

Fernández had a breakthrough season in 2008–2009, finishing 11th at the 2009 European Championships and qualifying an Olympic spot for Spain with his 19th-place result at the 2009 World Championships. He was the first Spanish men's skater to qualify for the Olympics since 1956.[23]

2009–10 season[edit]

Fernández received his first senior Grand Prix assignment, the 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard where he finished 11th. He was eighth at the 2010 European Championships, earning two spots for Spain in the following year's event. In his first Olympics, Fernández placed 16th in the short program, 10th in the free skate, and finished 14th overall. He was the first man in half a century to compete for Spain in Olympic figure skating – since the 1956 Olympics when Dario Villalba competed.[33][34]

Fernández set a new personal best score on his way to a 12th-place finish at the 2010 World Championships. He added the 4T to his jump repertoire in the 2009–10 season.

2010–11 season[edit]

After Morozov moved back to Russia, Fernández trained with him in Moscow and also Daugavpils in neighboring Latvia. His assigned events for the 2010–11 ISU Grand Prix season were the 2010 Skate Canada International and the 2010 Cup of Russia.[35] He placed fifth at Skate Canada and ninth at Cup of Russia. At the 2011 Spanish Championships, Fernández cut his hand during the warm-up and received medical attention for twenty minutes, leaving him no time to warm up again.[26][31] He was unable to defend his title, placing second behind Javier Raya. Since Spain had two men's slots at the 2011 European Championships due to Fernández' result the previous year, both skaters were sent to Bern, Switzerland. Fernández fell twice in the short program, leaving him in eleventh place, but was able to move up to ninth after the free skate and once again earned two spots for Spain at the next Europeans. At the 2011 World Championships, Fernández landed two different quads, (toe loop and Salchow), in the free skate. He earned his first top-ten finish at the event, giving Spain two spots for the 2012 Worlds men's event.[36]

In June 2011, Fernández confirmed that he was no longer working with Morozov and would temporarily train in Canada with Brian Orser.[26] This was due to instability resulting from Morozov's training group moving around frequently[22] and Morozov's focus on Florent Amodio.[26] He said that adding a quad to his short program and improving his basic skating were some of his goals for the 2011–12 season.[26]

2011–12 season[edit]

Fernández finished 4th at his first competition of the season, the 2011 Nebelhorn Trophy. At an interview conducted at the event, he said that he would continue to train in Canada, with David Wilson and Jeffrey Buttle as his choreographers.[24] Fernández and Orser said they were working on saving energy and improving spins, transitions and skating skills.[37]

His assigned events for the 2011–12 Grand Prix season were Skate Canada and Cup of Russia. At Skate Canada, Fernández executed the only clean quadruple jump in the short program to take the lead over Daisuke Takahashi and Patrick Chan.[38] He placed second in the free skate and won the silver medal overall, exceeding his combined total personal best by over thirty points. He became the first Spanish skater to win a Grand Prix medal.[18] At the Cup of Russia, he placed fourth in the short program, first in the free skate, and finished second overall with an overall total of 241.63 points — only 0.03 behind gold medalist Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan.[39] Fernández became the first Spanish skater to ever qualify for the Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final when he qualified for the 2011–12 event. In Quebec City, he was third in the short program and fourth in the long to win the bronze medal, and in so doing, became the first Spaniard to medal at a Grand Prix Final.[40][41][42] Fernández reclaimed his national title, winning by over eighty points.[43]

The remainder of the season proved less successful for Fernández. Although considered a medal favorite at the 2012 Europeans, he finished sixth.[44] At the 2012 World Championships, Fernández placed fifth in the short program but dropped to ninth overall after the free skate.[45] After these results, he agreed to perform full run-throughs of his programs more frequently in practice.[22]

2012–13 season[edit]

ISU abbreviations:
Jumps
T Toe loop
S Salchow
Lo Loop
F Flip
Lz Lutz
A Axel

Fernández started his season at the 2012 Finlandia Trophy[46] where he picked up the bronze medal. His first Grand Prix event of the season was the 2012 Skate Canada, where he beat defending Skate Canada and World champion, Patrick Chan, to take the gold medal. Fernández became the first Spaniard to win a gold medal in the Grand Prix series. Despite his fourth place at the 2012 NHK Trophy, he qualified for the Grand Prix Final. He finished fourth overall at the final after winning the free program with a 4S-3T jump combination, 4S, and 4T.[47] He became the second European to execute three quads in one program — the first being Brian Joubert who landed a 4T-2T combination, 4T, and 4S at the 2006 Cup of Russia[48] — and the first European to do so with a quad-triple combination.

Fernández (center) claims his first Grand Prix gold at the 2012 Skate Canada, with Patrick Chan (left) and Nobunari Oda (right).

In December 2012, Fernández won his third national title.[49] At the 2013 European Championships, he missed some practice time due to his skates being lost at the airport but they were found one day before the start of the competition.[31][50] Second in the short program, he then placed first in the free skate, landing three quads jumps with one in combination.[51][52] He won the gold medal and became the first Spanish skater to win a European title.[53][54] He posted a new personal best overall score of 274.87 points. He later joked, "I have to make sure I lose my skates again!"[55] At this time, Spain had just 14 indoor rinks and 600 registered figure skaters.[22]

At the 2013 World Championships in London, Ontario, Fernández placed 7th in the short program and 4th in the free skate. Finishing with a total score of 249.06 points, he placed third in the overall standings and won the bronze medal behind three-time World champion Patrick Chan and silver medalist Denis Ten. He became the first Spanish skater to stand on a World Championships podium in figure skating.

2013–14 season[edit]

In October 2013, Fernández was invited to skate at the 2013 Japan Open as part of Team Europe alongside Michal Březina, Adelina Sotnikova and Irina Slutskaya. He scored 176.91 points in the free program and won the men's event while Team Europe placed third. In the 2013–14 Grand Prix season, Fernández placed fifth at the 2013 NHK Trophy and third at the 2013 Rostelecom Cup — not enough to qualify for the Grand Prix Final. In December, he won his fourth national title.

Fernández chose to use old skates after struggling with two new pairs of boots.[56] He entered the 2014 European Championships in Budapest, Hungary, as the defending champion. He placed first in the short program with a clean skate, 6 points ahead of Russia's Sergei Voronov. His score of 91.56 was a new personal best at the time[57] – the first occasion he crossed the 90 point mark in international competition. In his free skate, Fernández completed three quads (stepping out of the opening toe loop and the second quad Salchow), a triple Axel and five more triples, but doubled a Lutz and underrotated the second jump of his quad Salchow-triple toe loop combination. He scored 175.55 points in the segment, 267.11 points overall, and won the European title for the second year in a row.[58]

In February, Fernández competed in the men's singles event at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.[59] He was the flag bearer for Spain during the opening ceremony.[60] Earning 86.98 points in the short program, he placed third behind Yuzuru Hanyu and Patrick Chan, having stepped out of his quad Salchow and triple Lutz-triple toe loop combination. In the free skate, he landed a quad toe loop and a quad Salchow – the latter in combination – but tripled a second quad Salchow attempt. He went on to complete another triple Salchow as the last jump of his skate, which – having been repeated in the program – was rated as an invalid element, and received no points.[61] He placed fifth in the free skate segment with 166.94 points, ultimately coming in fourth, 1.18 points behind Olympic bronze medalist Denis Ten of Kazakhstan.

Fernández ended his season at the 2014 World Championships in Saitama, Japan. He skated a clean short program and earned 96.42 points, improving on his personal best in the segment by 4.86 points.[62] He stood in third place behind Sochi Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu and Tatsuki Machida of Japan. He landed three quads in his free skate along with five triples, but singled a planned triple Lutz and added only a double as the second jump of his quad Salchow combination.[63] He placed third in the segment with 179.51 points for a total score of 275.93, and repeated as World bronze medalist, behind Hanyu (gold) and Machida (silver).

2014–15 season[edit]

Fernández originally planned to sit out of the Grand Prix series but decided to take part after he found out that the Final would be held in his home country, in Barcelona.[64]

Fernández began his Grand Prix season with a silver medal at the 2014 Skate Canada International, finishing eleven points behind Japan's Takahito Mura. Defeating Russia's Sergei Voronov by thirteen points, he won gold at the 2014 Rostelecom Cup and qualified for his third Grand Prix Final. At the Final, held in Barcelona, Fernández placed fifth in the short program after he fell on his quadruple Salchow jump, doubled the first jump of his planned tiple Lutz-triple toe loop combination, and stumbled during connecting steps.[65] He scored 79.18 points, trailing leader Yuzuru Hanyu by almost 15 points. He recovered to place second in the free skate, again behind Hanyu, with a program that included two quad jumps, six triple jumps, and level-four spins and footwork, but he tripled a planned quad Salchow jump[66] and singled a triple Lutz jump.[67] He scored 174.72 points in the free skate, and 253.90 in total. Overall, he won the silver medal behind Yuzuru Hanyu.

Fernández (center) atop the podium at the 2015 World Figure Skating Championships with Yuzuru Hanyu (left) and Denis Ten (right).

At the 2015 European Championships in Stockholm, Fernández took the lead in the short program after he stepped out of his quad Salchow and the second jump of his triple Lutz-triple toe loop combination, but completed a triple Axel jump and level-four spins and footwork, scoring 89.24 points in the segment.[68] In the free skate, he completed a quad toe loop and six triple jumps, but fell on a quad Salchow jump attempt and tripled another. Despite the errors, he won the free skate with 173.25 points, more than 15 points ahead of Russia's Maxim Kovtun, and claimed his third consecutive European title with a total of 262.49 points.[69]

Fernández skated a clean short program at the 2015 World Championships in Shanghai, which included a quad Salchow, a triple Lutz-triple toe loop combination, a triple Axel and level-four spins. But his step sequence was rated level-three and his triple Axel was not perfect.[70] He received 92.74 points and stood in second place, less than 2.5 points behind Yuzuru Hanyu.[71] He produced a free skate with two quads, six triples, level-four spins and level-three step sequence. His only major error was a fall on a quad Salchow attempt. He placed second in the segment with 181.16 points – his strongest free skate of the season – more than 5 points ahead of Hanyu and just 0.67 behind Kazakhstan's Denis Ten. Overall, he outscored Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu (silver) and Olympic bronze medalist Denis Ten (bronze) for the gold medal, having received a total of 273.90 points.[72] He became the first skater from Spain to win a world title in figure skating.[73]

2015–16 season[edit]

Fernández (left) earns his second silver medal at the 2015–16 Grand Prix Final, with Yuzuru Hanyu (center) and Shoma Uno (right)

During the 2015–16 Grand Prix series, Fernández won gold at both of his events, the 2015 Cup of China and 2015 Rostelecom Cup, and qualified for the 2015–16 Grand Prix Final in Barcelona.[74] Second to Hanyu in both segments in Barcelona, he won silver in the Grand Prix Final for the second year in a row. In the free program, he landed his three planned quadruple jumps and scored 201.43 points, becoming the second skater in history to receive over 200 points in this segment.[12]

Fernández defended his national title at the Spanish Championships in December 2015, attempting and completing two quadruple jumps[75] in his short program for the first time in his career (a quad toe loop in combination with a triple toe loop, and a quad Salchow).[76]

At the 2016 European Championships in Bratislava, Fernández successfully landed a quad toe loop-triple toe loop combination, quad Salchow, and triple Axel to score a new personal best of 102.54 points in the short program. With this score, he became only the second man in history to break 100 points in that segment.[11] With a 14-point advantage going into the free skate, Fernández landed three quadruple jumps, but fell on the second triple Axel of the program (which he had just added).[77] He scored 200.23 points, for a combined total of 302.77, becoming the second skater in history to cross the 300 point mark.[13] He finished ahead of silver medalist Oleksii Bychenko by a margin of over 60 points.

Entering the 2016 World Championships in Boston as the defending champion, Fernández opened his short program with a quad toe loop-triple toe loop combination, then fell on his quad Salchow attempt, but recovered to complete a triple Axel, two level-four spins and level-four footwork, scoring 98.52 points and securing second place. After the short program, he could do little practice due to a recurring bursa on the heel of his right foot. On the day of the free skate, the medical team of the event attended to his injury for several hours and helped him to alleviate the problem.[78] Fernández entered the free skate segment with a 12.04 deficit behind Yuzuru Hanyu – the largest point gap at the time between first and second place after the short program in any discipline at a World Championships or Olympic Games under the ISU judging system.[79] Fernández completed a clean free skate, which included three quads (a toe loop and two Salchows, one in combination with a triple toe loop), two triple Axels, four more triples as well as difficult spins and level-four footwork, and scored 216.41, surpassing his personal best in the segment by 14.98 points. He reached a total score of 314.93, also a new personal best. (His free skating and total scores were the second and third highest, respectively, under the ISU judging system as of the event.) Hanyu made mistakes in his free skate, allowing Fernández to close the point gap and overtake him by a further 19.76 points to become the 2016 World champion, ahead of Yuzuru Hanyu (silver) and Jin Boyang (bronze).[80][81]

According to a May 2016 news article, Fernández's income from shows is greater than his competitive earnings.[21] When he won his second World title, Spain had 17 ice rinks, compared to a hundred in Toronto, and 300 licensed skaters, compared to about 15,000 in France.[82][83]

2016–17 season[edit]

Fernández participated at the 2016 Rostelecom Cup and the 2016 Trophée de France as his two assignments in the 2016–17 Grand Prix series. He trailed Japan's Shoma Uno after the short program at the Russian Grand Prix event, having tripled one of his quad attempts.[84] However, he rallied back with a strong free skate in which he produced three quads, two triple Axels, and received the first 200+ long program score of the season: 201.43.[85] One week later, Fernández won both the short program and the free skate at the French Grand Prix, despite a fall in each segment of the event – on a quad toe loop in the short program,[86] and a triple Axel in the free skate.[87] He collected 15 points from both events and qualified for the 2016–17 Grand Prix Final with maximum points.[88]

At the Grand Prix Final held in Marseille, Fernández placed third in the short program with 91.76 points, after he hit a quad toe loop-triple toe loop combination, but stumbled on his quad Salchow and fell on the triple Axel.[89] Subsequently he made a number of errors in the free skate as well, where he tripled his planned quad toe loop, underrotated and stumbled on a quad Salchow and fell on his second triple Axel.[90] He finished fourth in the free skate with 177.01 points and dropped to 4th place overall with a total score of 268.77.[91] This was the first event since the 2014 Winter Olympic Games where he failed to make the podium.

Fernández won his seventh national title at the Spanish Championships in December 2016. He hit two quads in his short program (the toe loop in combination with a triple toe loop, and the Salchow with a hand down) to take the lead, and followed with a free skate which included two quads (a toe loop and a Salchow) and two triple Axels (the first in combination with a triple toe loop – a new element for Fernández).[92]

The 2017 European Championships were held in Ostrava, where Fernández successfully defended the title he had held since 2013. He skated a clean short program including two quads (one in combination with a triple), a triple Axel and all level four elements to claim first place in the segment and achieve a new personal best of 104.25 points.[93] His free skate included three quads and seven triples, however he over-rotated his first quad Salchow and crashed to the ice from the second. Fernández recovered to finish his routine and earned 190.59 points, winning the free skating segment over Russian Maxim Kovtun by over 18 points.[94] Fernández received 294.84 points overall to win the gold medal,[95] and became the first skater since Ondrej Nepela (1969–73) to win five consecutive European men's titles, and only the third in history to have achieved this feat, including Karl Schäfer, who won the title 8 consecutive times (1929–36).

At the 2017 World Championships in Helsinki, he delivered the best short program of his career, which included faultless jump elements (a quad-triple toe loop combination, a quad Salchow and a triple Axel), three level four spins, and received maximum grades of execution from every judge for the step sequence.[96] He received 109.05 points in the short program to take the lead, improving his personal best by 4.8 points, and scoring the third highest mark ever at the time of the event.[97] Fernández started his free skate well with a quad toe loop, quad Salchow-triple toe loop and triple Axel-double toe loop, however he fell on another quad Salchow attempt, doubled a planned triple flip and stumbled on the landing of the triple loop to finish 6th in the segment, and dropped to 4th place overall.[98][99] After four consecutive medals, he finished off the podium at a World Championships for the first time since 2012.

2017–18 season[edit]

Fernández began the season earlier than usual by participating at the Skate Canada Autumn Classic International with music from the Chaplin film Modern Times for his short program and Man of La Mancha for his free program. He remained with two planned quads in the short program and three in the free program despite the quad fever that could be observed in the sport.[100] He received 101.20 points for his short program after executing a quad toe loop-double toe loop, a quad Salchow, and a triple Axel, scoring 11.52 points behind Yuzuru Hanyu who set a new highest score.[101] Fernández popped his first quad Salchow attempt during the free program, which was subsequently downgraded, but performed two clean quads and five triples to receive 177.87 points. He earned 279.07 points in total, 10.83 points ahead of Hanyu, and won the gold medal.[102][103]

Fernández competed for Team Europe at the Japan Open invitational tournament in Saitama, alongside Evgenia Medvedeva, Alina Zagitova and Oleksii Bychenko. Fernández performed two quads and two triple Axels in his free skate, winning the men's discipline with 189.47 points.[104] Team Europe narrowly beat Team Japan to win the overall competition.[105]

During the 2017–18 Grand Prix series, Fernández first competed in the 2017 Cup of China. He placed 3rd in the short program after popping his planned quadruple-triple combination, scoring 90.57 points. He made several costly mistakes in the free program as well and finished 6th in the segment (162.49) and 6th overall (253.06).[106] It was revealed after the competition that Fernández had been suffering from stomach problems.[107] His second Grand Prix assignment was the 2017 Internationaux de France in Grenoble. Fernández won the short program with a clean skate for which he received 107.86 points, the 5th highest short program score on record at the time of the event.[108] His free skate was marred by two falls and he stepped out of the landings of three other jumps to finish 2nd behind Shoma Uno in the segment with 175.85 points. His nearly 14 point lead from the short program was enough however to win the event overall with 283.71 points. This was the 7th career Grand Prix title for Fernández.[109]

In December 2017, Fernández claimed his 7th consecutive and 8th overall senior Spanish national title. He hit all planned jumps in the short program to receive 107.73 points, and landed two quads during the free skate before falling on the third to score 180.57 points in the segment and 288.30 points overall.[110][111] As opposed to Spain's other Olympic spots, his qualification for the 2018 Winter Olympics was not determined by this event, as it had been announced previously that Fernández would take the first of Spain's two spots in the men's discipline.[112]

As reported by Spanish media, Fernández announced that the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang would be his last participation at the Olympic Games.[113]

Fernández at the 2018 European Figure Skating Championships, where he claimed his sixth consecutive title.

Fernández started the second half of the season at the 2018 European Championships in Moscow. He took a commanding lead in the short program with a nearly flawless performance which included a quad-triple toe loop combination, a triple Axel and level 4 spins. His only mistake was turning out of the landing of the quad Salchow. Fernández received 103.82 points in the segment, crossing the 100 mark at international competitions for the third time during the season, and led the field 12.49 points ahead of nearest rival Dmitri Aliev.[114] Fernández hit two quads, two triple Axels and three other triples to win the free skating, but popped his third quad attempt to a triple and stumbled on a downgraded triple flip. He earned 191.73 points in the segment,[115] improving on his previous season's best by nearly 14 points, and won the gold medal with a total of 295.55 points. With this victory Fernández became the first man in 82 years to have won the European Championships 6 consecutive times (2013–18). He has joined an elite group of skaters able to dominate the event for 6 years or more: Karl Schäfer (8 years, 1929–36) in men, Sonja Henie (6 years, 1931–36) and Katarina Witt (6 years, 1983–88) in ladies, Marika Kilius / Hans-Jürgen Bäumler (6 years, 1959–64) and Irina Rodnina (10 years, 1969–78, with two partners: Alexei Ulanov, 1969–72 and Alexander Zaitsev, 1973–78) in pairs.

Fernández (right) earns his second bronze medal at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games, with Yuzuru Hanyu (center) and Shoma Uno (left)

Fernández opened his bid to win the first Olympic medal in figure skating for Spain with a flawless performance of his Modern Times short program at the 2018 Winter Olympics. The program included a quad-triple toe loop combination, a quad Salchow, a triple Axel and all level 4 elements. He received nine perfect 10.00 scores in program components and finished in second place in the segment with 107.58 points.,[116] only behind defending champion Yuzuru Hanyu. He expressed his aspirations afterwards: "I'll say tomorrow I would be happy if I am in the same position. I have been training to be first, but we know how good a talent Yuzu is. He is really tough competition. I will fight all the way. And if I'm first, I'm first; if I'm second, I'm second; and if I'm third, I'm third. I'll be happy."[117] Fernández put out a strong performance during the free skating as well, landing a quad toe loop, a quad Salchow in combination, two triple Axels and five more triples, along with choreography characteristic of the Man of La Mancha program's theme, and earning a further four perfect 10.00 component marks. His only major mistake was popping a planned second quad Salchow into a double. His performance earned 197.66[118] points in the segment for a 305.24 total[119] – both season's best scores. Fernández won the bronze medal behind Japan's Yuzuru Hanyu and Shoma Uno – standing on the Olympic podium for first time in his career, and winning a historic first ever figure skating Olympic medal for Spain. "I finally got the medal I always wanted. I am proud I can take it home and share it with the people. It means a lot. For my country I hope it means a lot also. I know it means a lot for my family, they put so much effort, so much money, so much time into this. Same as me. I am sure they are as happy as I am. It means the world." he commented on his podium finish.[120] Fernández went on to deliver a crowd-pleasing exhibition in the figure skating gala, wearing a "Super Javi" Spanish-colored Superman costume, that included parodies of Flashdance and iconic 1980’s workout jams.[121][122]

After the men's individual competition at the 2018 Winter Olympics concluded, Fernández returned to Madrid where he confirmed to Spanish media that he would not be competing at the 2018 World Championships in Milan. He cited his satisfaction with winning the bronze medal in PyeongChang to finish his season as the reason for the decision.[123] Fernández also stated his intention to leave Canada, where he had trained since 2011, and return to Madrid to promote figure skating in Spain. Although he did not rule out future competitions entirely, he confirmed that he would not participate in another World Championships or Olympics.[124]

2018–19 season[edit]

With the establishment of the new +5 / -5 Grade of Execution (GOE) scale at the start of the season, all previously recorded scores since the 2004 introduction of the ISU Judging System (IJS) were archived as historical statistics. During the 14 seasons the +3 / -3 GOE scale was in use, Fernández achieved the 2nd highest personal best short program score (109.05),[125] the 3rd highest free skating score (216.41)[126] and the 4th highest total score (314.93).[127]

Fernández decided to skip the 2018–19 Grand Prix series,[128] and elected the Japan Open invitational tournament as his only competition during the first part of the season. He competed for Team Europe at the event, and placed 3rd among men with a score of 157.86 for his free program. Team Europe won the silver medal overall.[129]

On November 28, Fernández officially announced his retirement from competitive skating, with the 2019 European Figure Skating Championships as his last competition.[130] Speaking about his decision, he expressed that he needed to think about the level of competition he wanted to be at, because he felt his body and mind were no longer there, which he had to accept. He added that he preferred to retire at the right time, when he was satisfied with his career and had plans for the future, referring among other projects to his Revolution ON Ice skating show, with which he toured Spain in November and December 2018. The news of his retirement was widely reported in Spanish as well as global media.[131][132][133][134][135][136][137][138] It was also confirmed that Fernández would not compete at the Spanish National Championships in December.[139]

Awards[edit]

Royal Order of Sports Merit of Spain

  • Gold Medal (2016)[19]

Spanish Olympic Committee

  • Outstanding Athlete of the Year (2014,[140] 2018[141])

National Sports Council

Media

  • AS Sports Awards [es]: Athlete of the Year 2015 (2015)[143]
  • Madrid Sports Press Association (APDM): Individual Athlete of the Year (2017)[144]
  • Marca: 80th Anniversary Awards "Spirit of Success in Sport: Perfection" (2018)[145][146]

Municipality

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2017–2018
[150][151][152]





2016–2017
[163]

  • Pirates of the Caribbean[164]
    (not the 2009–2011 free skating)


2015–2016
[20][165][166]
  • Malagueña
    by Ernesto Lecuona
    performed by Paco de Lucía, Plácido Domingo
    choreo. by Antonio Najarro




  • Heart Keeps Dancing[170]
    by James Gruntz


2014–2015
[173][174]


  • Aerobic Class (Mix)
    choreo. by Kurt Browning, Geoffrey Tyler[158]


2013–2014
[175][176][177]

2012–2013
[46][180]
  • Aerobic Class (Mix)
    choreo. by Kurt Browning, Geoffrey Tyler[158]

2011–2012
[181]
  • I Love Paris
    by Sam Butera and The Witnesses
  • Petit Fleur
    by Henri René and His Orchestra
    choreo. by David Wilson with Jeffrey Buttle[38]
  • The Lazy Song
    by Bruno Mars
    choreo. by Jeffrey Buttle

2010–2011
[33]
2009–2010
[182][183]
(at Worlds)

(at Olympics)

  • James Bond
    (medley)

(at Europeans)

  • The Mexican
2008–2009
[184][185]

  • Romeo and Juliet
    (soundtrack)
2007–2008
[186]
2006–2007
[187]

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[188]
Event 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18-19
Olympics 14th 4th 3rd
Worlds 35th 30th 19th 12th 10th 9th 3rd 3rd 1st 1st 4th WD
Europeans 28th 17th 11th 8th 9th 6th 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st TBD
GP Final 3rd 4th 2nd 2nd 4th
GP France 11th 1st 1st
GP NHK Trophy 4th 5th
GP Cup of China 1st 6th
GP Rostelecom Cup 9th 2nd 3rd 1st 1st 1st
GP Skate Canada 5th 2nd 1st 2nd
CS Autumn Classic 1st
Cup of Nice 3rd 5th
Finlandia Trophy 3rd
Golden Spin 13th
Merano Cup 1st
Nebelhorn Trophy 4th
NRW Trophy 3rd
International: Junior[188]
Junior Worlds 13th
JGP Estonia 9th
JGP Mexico 6th
JGP Netherlands 23rd
JGP Spain 4th
JGP U.K. 11th
EYOF 4th
Egna Spring Trophy 5th
National[188]
Spanish Champ. 1st J 1st J 1st J 1st 2nd 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st
Team events[189][190]
Japan Open 3rd T
(1st P)
1st T
(2nd P)
3rd T
(2nd P)
2nd T
(2nd P)
1st T
(1st P)
2nd T
(3rd P)
J. = Junior level, TBD = Assigned, WD = Withdrew
T = Team result, P = Personal result; Medals awarded for team result only.

2003–2006[edit]

International[188]
Event 03–04 04–05 05–06
Merano Cup 3rd N.
Triglav Trophy 4th N.
National
Spanish Champ. 2nd J.
J. = Junior level
N. = Novice level

Detailed results[edit]

Fernández at the 2014 World Championships podium
Fernández and his fellow medalists at the 2013 World Championships

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships.

2018–19 season
Date Event SP FS Total
6 October 2018 2018 Japan Open - 3
157.86
2T/3P
2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
16–17 February 2018 2018 Winter Olympics 2
107.58
4
197.66
3
305.24
15–21 January 2018 2018 European Championships 1
103.82
1
191.73
1
295.55
15–17 December 2017 2018 Spanish Championships 1
107.73
1
180.57
1
288.30
17–19 November 2017 2017 Internationaux de France 1
107.86
2
175.85
1
283.71
3–5 November 2017 2017 Cup of China 3
90.57
6
162.49
6
253.06
7 October 2017 2017 Japan Open - 1
189.47
1T/1P
20–23 September 2017 2017 Autumn Classic International 2
101.20
1
177.87
1
279.07
2016–17 season
Date Event SP FS Total
29 March – 2 April 2017 2017 World Figure Skating Championships 1
109.05
6
192.14
4
301.19
25–29 January 2017 2017 European Championships 1
104.25
1
190.59
1
294.84
16–18 December 2016 2017 Spanish Championships 1
99.39
1
201.56
1
300.95
8–11 December 2016 2016–17 Grand Prix Final 3
91.76
4
177.01
4
268.77
11–13 November 2016 2016 Trophée de France 1
96.57
1
188.81
1
285.38
4–6 November 2016 2016 Rostelecom Cup 2
91.55
1
201.43
1
292.98
1 October 2016 2016 Japan Open - 2
192.20
2T/2P
2015–16 season
Date Event SP FS Total
28 March – 3 April 2016 2016 World Championships 2
98.52
1
216.41
1
314.93
27–31 January 2016 2016 European Championships 1
102.54
1
200.23
1
302.77
18–20 December 2015 2016 Spanish Championships 1
104.68
1
190.69
1
295.37
10–13 December 2015 2015–16 Grand Prix Final 2
91.52
2
201.43
2
292.95
20–22 November 2015 2015 Rostelecom Cup 2
86.99
1
184.44
1
271.43
5–8 November 2015 2015 Cup of China 1
93.19
1
177.36
1
270.55
3 October 2015 2015 Japan Open - 2
176.24
3T/2P
2014–15 season
Date Event SP FS Total
23–29 March 2015 2015 World Championships 2
92.74
2
181.16
1
273.90
26 January – 1 February 2015 2015 European Championships 1
89.24
1
173.25
1
262.49
19–21 December 2014 2015 Spanish Championships 1
87.06
1
168.05
1
255.11
11–14 December 2014 2014–15 Grand Prix Final 5
79.18
2
174.72
2
253.90
14–16 November 2014 2014 Rostelecom Cup 1
93.92
1
172.09
1
265.01.
31 October – 2 November 2014 2014 Skate Canada 1
86.36
2
158.51
2
244.87
4 October 2014 2014 Japan Open 2
155.46
1T/2P
2013–14 season
Date Event SP FS Total
26–29 March 2014 2014 World Championships 2
96.42
3
179.51
3
275.93
13–14 February 2014 2014 Winter Olympics 3
86.98
5
166.94
4
253.92
13–19 January 2014 2014 European Championships 1
91.56
1
175.55
1
267.11
21–22 December 2013 2014 Spanish Championships 1
97.91
1
187.66
1
285.57
22–24 November 2013 2013 Rostelecom Cup 3
81.87
5
145.12
3
226.99
8–10 November 2013 2013 NHK Trophy 2
84.78
8
145.67
5
230.45
5 October 2013 2013 Japan Open 1
176.91
3T/1P
2012–13 season
Date Event SP FS Total
10–17 March 2013 2013 World Championships 7
80.76
4
168.30
3
249.06
23–27 January 2013 2013 European Championships 2
88.80
1
186.07
1
274.87
14–16 December 2012 2013 Spanish Championships 1
79.02
1
149.76
1
228.78
6–9 December 2012 2012 Grand Prix Final 5
80.19
1
178.43
4
258.62
23–25 November 2012 2012 NHK Trophy 3
86.23
5
146.55
4
232.78
26–28 October 2012 2012 Skate Canada 1
85.87
1
168.07
1
253.94
5–7 October 2012 2012 Finlandia Trophy 1
80.77
3
154.43
3
235.20
2011–12 season
Date Event SP FS Total
26 March – 1 April 2012 2012 World Championships 5
81.87
14
144.00
9
225.97
7–12 February 2012 2012 European Championships 4
80.1
7
142.15
6
222.26
22–26 December 2011 2012 Spanish Championships 1
63.68
1
154.06
1
217.74
8–11 December 2011 2011 Grand Prix Final 3
81.26
4
166.29
3
247.55
25–27 November 2011 2011 Rostelecom Cup 4
78.50
1
163.13
2
241.63
27–30 October 2011 2011 Skate Canada International 1
84.71
2
165.62
2
250.33
21–24 September 2011 2011 Nebelhorn Trophy 6
66.87
4
137.59
4
204.46
2010–11 season
Date Event SP FS Total
24 April – 1 May 2011 2011 World Championships 14
69.16
10
149.10
10
218.26
24–30 January 2011 2011 European Championships 11
60.48
7
139.17
9
199.65
24–27 December 2010 2011 Spanish Championships 1
71.50
2
120.63
2
192.13
19–21 November 2010 2010 Cup of Russia 8
66.46
10
117.60
9
184.06
29–31 October 2010 2010 Skate Canada International 6
66.74
4
144.11
5
210.85
13–17 October 2010 2010 Cup of Nice 6
66.88
4
132.43
5
199.31
2009–10 season
Date Event SP FS Total
22–28 March 2010 2010 World Championships 13
71.65
10
144.01
12
215.66
14–27 February 2010 2010 Winter Olympic Games 16
68.69
10
137.99
14
206.68
18–24 January 2010 2010 European Championships 13
66.50
6
138.33
8
204.83
12–13 December 2009 2010 Spanish Championships 1
65.55
1
119.59
1
185.14
4–8 November 2009 2009 Cup of Nice 11
53.75
1
130.58
3
184.33
16–17 October 2009 2009 Trophée Eric Bompard 10
60.56
11
109.60
11
170.16
2008–09 season
Date Event SP FS Total
24–28 March 2009 2009 World Championships 20
63.75
19
119.80
19
193.55
20–24 January 2009 2009 European Championships 12
65.75
11
117.16
11
182.91
December 2008 2009 Spanish Junior Championships 1
1
1
4–7 December 2008 2008 NRW Trophy 3
5
3
190.69
25–28 September 2008 2008 JGP Spain 10
45.20
3
111.98
4
157.18
25–28 September 2008 2008 JGP Mexico 4
54.57
8
92.78
6
147.35
2007–08 season
Date Event SP FS Total
17–23 March 2008 2008 World Championships 30
47.87
25 February – 2 March 2008 2008 World Junior Championships 14
52.25
11
108.76
13
161.01
22–27 January 2008 2008 European Championships 16
51.94
17
102.16
17
154.10
December 2007 2008 Spanish Junior Championships 1
1
1
8–11 November 2007 2007 Golden Spin 12
12
13
145.72
20–22 September 2007 2007 JGP Estonia 9
46.18
9
93.24
9
139.42
5–7 October 2007 2007 JGP Great Britain 9
49.81
10
97.82
11
147.63
2006–07 season
Date Event SP FS Total
19–25 March 2007 2007 World Championships 35
41.57
DNQ
22–28 January 2007 2007 European Championships 28
41.73
17
102.16
17
154.10
December 2006 2007 Spanish Junior Championships 1
1
1
5–6 October 2006 2006 JGP Netherlands 18
37.38
24
51.46
23
88.84

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Media related to Javier Fernandez at Wikimedia Commons

Olympic Games
Preceded by
Queralt Castellet
Flagbearer for  Spain
2014 Sochi
Succeeded by
Lucas Eguibar