Jean-Michel Parasiliti di Para

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Jean-Michel Parasiliti di Para
Pretender
Parasiliti di Para.jpg
Born(1942-03-26)26 March 1942
Aix-en-Provence, France
Died16 December 2017(2017-12-16) (aged 75)
Marmande, France
Title(s)Known as "King Antoine IV"
Throne(s) claimedKingdom of Araucanía and Patagonia
Pretend from2014–2017
SpouseSheila Rani
ChildrenTwo
PredecessorPhilippe Boiry
SuccessorFrédéric Luz

Jean-Michel Parasiliti di Para (or Jean-Michel Parasiliti named Para)[1] (26 March 1942 – 16 December 2017) was the pretender to the throne of the Kingdom of Araucanía and Patagonia under the name of Antoine IV from 9 January 2014 to 16 December 2017. The kingdom has been described as "an ephemeral 19th-century state"[2] and as a "strange symbolic monarchy".[3]

Biography[edit]

Early life and work[edit]

Jean-Michel Parasiliti was a French military veteran who served in the Algerian War, being awarded the Combatant's Cross, the North Africa Medal, and the North Africa Security and Order Operations Commemorative Medal, with Algeria bar, among others. After his career in the military he turned to social work, specializing in the care of children and adults with intellectual disabilities. He received a range of national civil honours including the National Order of Merit (in 1995) and the Order of Academic Palms. He was married, with two children, and was of Sicilian descent. He held a doctorate in the history of civilization.

Pretender to the throne of Araucanía and Patagonia[edit]

The Kingdom of Araucanía and Patagonia is an unrecognised state associated with the Mapuche people, of which there are approximately 1.5 million in Chile and 200,000 in Argentina.[4] After the death in 2014 of the former pretender Philippe Boiry, Parasiliti succeeded on 9 January 2014 as pretender to the throne of the Kingdom of Araucanía and Patagonia under the name of Antoine IV.[5] Whether the Mapuche themselves accepted this, or were even aware of it, has not always been clear.[6]

The Kingdom of Araucanía and Patagonia has been called a "curious and semi-comic episode"[7] and the pretenders to the "throne" have been described as monarchs and sovereigns of fantasy,[8][9][10][11][12] "having only fanciful claims to a kingdom without legal existence and having no international recognition".[13] There does appear, however, to be increasing recognition of the role in defending Mapuche rights assumed by this "strange symbolic monarchy."[14][15] It has been reported that "the intensification of the Mapuche conflict in recent years has given a new purpose to the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia, long considered an absurdity by French society."[16]

Parasiliti died on 16 December 2017.[17] He was succeeded as pretender to the throne by Frédéric Luz.

Honours[edit]

National Honours
Foreign Honours

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Différentes official sources indicate that his real and legal name is : Jean-Michel Parasiliti called Para Journal Officiel of the French Republic january 30 2000.
  2. ^ Mat Youkee, '"We are hostages": indigenous Mapuche accuse Chile and Argentina of genocide', The Guardian, 12 April 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/12/indigenous-mapuche-accuse-chile-brazil-genocide accessed 31 July 2019
  3. ^ Marc Bassets, 'Federico I, un nieto de exiliado republicano en el "trono" de la Patagonia', El Pais, 1 June 2018, https://elpais.com/internacional/2018/05/31/mundo_global/1527781910_361229.html accessed 31 July 2019
  4. ^ Mat Youkee, '"We are hostages": indigenous Mapuche accuse Chile and Argentina of genocide', The Guardian, 12 April 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/12/indigenous-mapuche-accuse-chile-brazil-genocide accessed 31 July 2019
  5. ^ Peregrine, Anthony (5 February 2016). "France's forgotten monarchs" – via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  6. ^ Peregrine, Anthony (5 February 2016). "France's forgotten monarchs" – via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  7. ^ Collier, Simon; Sater, William F.: A history of Chile, 1808-2002. Cambridge University Press, 2004, ISBN 0-521-82749-3, p.96.
  8. ^ Fuligni, Bruno (1999). Politica Hermetica Les langues secrètes. L'Age d'homme. p. 135.
  9. ^ Journal du droit international privé et de la jurisprudence comparée. 1899. p. 910.
  10. ^ Montaigu, Henri (1979). Histoire secrète de l'Aquitaine. A. Michel. p. 255.
  11. ^ Lavoix, Camille (2015). Argentine : Le tango des ambitions. Nevicata.
  12. ^ Bulletin de la Société de géographie de Lille. 1907. p. 150.
  13. ^ Intermédiaire des chercheurs et curieux. ICC. 1972. p. 51.
  14. ^ Marc Bassets, 'Federico I, un nieto de exiliado republicano en el "trono" de la Patagonia', El Pais, 1 June 2018, https://elpais.com/internacional/2018/05/31/mundo_global/1527781910_361229.html accessed 31 July 2019
  15. ^ Baudouin Eschapasse, 'Querelle dynastique au royaume d'Araucanie', Le Point, 6 December 2018, https://www.lepoint.fr/monde/querelle-dynastique-au-royaume-d-araucanie-06-12-2018-2277162_24.php accessed 31 July 2019
  16. ^ Mat Youkee, '"We are hostages": indigenous Mapuche accuse Chile and Argentina of genocide', The Guardian, 12 April 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/12/indigenous-mapuche-accuse-chile-brazil-genocide accessed 31 July 2019
  17. ^ "Dordogne – Lot-et-Garonne : le prince d'Araucanie Antoine IV est décédé". SudOuest.fr (in French). 18 December 2017. Retrieved 2017-12-19.
  18. ^ "larenaissancefrancaise.org". larenaissancefrancaise.org.

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