Jean Heather

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Jean Heather
Jean Heather.jpg
Born Jean Hetherington
(1921-02-21)February 21, 1921
Omaha, Nebraska, U.S
Died October 29, 1995(1995-10-29) (aged 74)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Occupation Actress
Years active 1944–1949
Spouse(s) Arthur F. Meier (1944-85 his death)

Jean Heather (February 21, 1921 – October 29, 1995) was an American actress who appeared in eight feature films during the 1940s.

She acted in two Oscar-nominated movies in 1944—the crime drama Double Indemnity, in which she played Lola Dietrichson, a young woman convinced that her stepmother Phyllis (Barbara Stanwyck) is responsible for the murder of Lola's father, and Going My Way, where she played a runaway teenager assisted by Father O'Malley (Bing Crosby).

Heather's acting career was cut short by an automobile accident in December, 1947, in which she was thrown from her car onto the pavement and suffered severe facial lacerations.[1]

Heather attended Oregon State University, 1940-41. She transferred to the University of Washington in 1942. She was an initiate of the Alpha Theta Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi at the University of Washington.[2] Early in the war was named "Canteen Dream Girl of the Northwest," by Marine, Navy, Army and Coast Guard camps in Washington state.[3]

She married Arthur F. Meier, whose stage name was John Stockton, 5 July 1944 in Glendale, California. He died in 1985 from pulmonary disease.[4] Heather died 10 years later. Both were cremated and their ashes scattered in the Pacific Ocean.

Filmography[edit]

Film
Year Film Role Director(s) Notes
1949 Red Stallion in the Rockies Cynthia "Cindy" Smith Ralph Murphy
1947 The Last Round-up Carol Taylor John English
1946 The Well-Groomed Bride Wickley Sidney Lanfield
1945 Murder, He Says Elany Fleagle George Marshall
1944 National Barn Dance Betty Hugh Bennett
1944 Our Hearts Were Young and Gay Frances Smithers Lewis Allen
1944 Going My Way Carol James Leo McCarey
1944 Double Indemnity Lola Dietrichson Billy Wilder

References[edit]

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