Jean Pedersen

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Jean J. Pedersen

Jean J. Pedersen (1934–2016)[1][2] was an American mathematician and author and translator of several books on popular mathematics, and particularly known for her works on the mathematics of paper folding.

Education and career[edit]

Pedersen was born in Provo, Utah, the daughter of an ophthalmologist and a teacher. She studied home economics as an undergraduate at Brigham Young University, before becoming a graduate student in mathematics at the University of Utah under the supervision of E. Allen Davis.[2]

After completing her doctorate, she moved to San Jose, California, following her husband who worked for IBM. She joined the faculty at the University of Santa Clara on a part-time basis, but shifted to full time and was promoted to full professor in 1996. She was the first woman to teach mathematics at the university, and the first to be tenured as a mathematics professor.[2]

Books[edit]

Pedersen's books include:

  • Build Your Own Polyhedra (with Peter Hilton, Addison-Wesley, 1988)[3]
  • Mathematical Reflections: In a Room with Many Windows (with Peter Hilton and Derek Holton, Springer, 1996)[4][5]
  • Mathematical Vistas: From a Room with Many Windows (with Peter Hilton and Derek Holton, Springerl 2002)[4][6]
  • 99 Points of Intersection: Examples—Pictures—Proofs (with Hans Walser, Mathematical Association of America, 2006)[7]
  • A Mathematical Tapestry: Demonstrating the Beautiful Unity of Mathematics (with Peter Hilton, illustrated by Sylvie Donmoyer, Cambridge University Press, 2010)[8]

She and Peter Hilton also translated The Golden Section and Symmetry by Hans Walser from German into English. Both translations were published by the Mathematical Association of America in 2001.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jean Pedersen (1934–2016)", News, Events & Announcements, American Mathematical Society, February 5, 2016
  2. ^ a b c "Jean Pedersen", Santa Clara Magazine, June 6, 2016, retrieved 2018-10-29
  3. ^ Reviews of Build Your Own Polyhedra:
    • Schmidt, Don (February 1989), The Mathematics Teacher, 82 (2): 145, JSTOR 27966155
    • Leiva, Miriam A. (April 1989), The Arithmetic Teacher, 36 (8): 58–59, JSTOR 41193678
    • Jacob, Wiliam (October 1994), The Mathematics Teacher, 87 (7): 572, JSTOR 27969009
    • Provost, Mary D. (September–October 1995), Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 1 (6): 497–498, JSTOR 41181482
  4. ^ a b Review of Mathematical Reflections and Mathematical Vistas:
    • Leversha, Gerry (July 2003), The Mathematical Gazette, 87 (509): 376–379, JSTOR 3621090
  5. ^ Review of Mathematical Reflections:
    • Anthony, Joby Milo (August–September 1998), The American Mathematical Monthly, 105 (7): 682–686, doi:10.2307/2589274
  6. ^ Reviews of Mathematical Vistas:
    • Schaefer, Marvin (June 2002), "Review", MAA Reviews
    • Cohen, Marion (May 2003), The American Mathematical Monthly, 110 (5): 455–458, doi:10.2307/3647846
  7. ^ Reviews of 99 Points of Intersection:
    • Ashbacher, Charles (2004–2005), "Review", Journal of Recreational Mathematics, 33 (3): 215–216
    • Poplicher, Mihaela (September 2006), "Review", MAA Reviews
    • Coupland, Mary (2006), "Review", Australian Mathematics Teacher, 62 (3): 32
    • Jensen, John (March 2007), The Mathematics Teacher, 100 (7): 511–512, JSTOR 27972312
    • Leversha, Gerry (November 2008), The Mathematical Gazette, 92 (525): 588–589, JSTOR 27821873
  8. ^ Reviews of A Mathematical Tapestry:
  9. ^ Review of The Golden Section and Symmetry:
    • Winteridge, Bud (July 2003), The Mathematical Gazette, 87 (509): 386–387, JSTOR 3621098