Jeanne Cagney

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Jeanne Cagney
Jeanne Cagney 1942.JPG
Born (1919-03-25)March 25, 1919
New York City, New York,
United States
Died December 7, 1984(1984-12-07) (aged 65)
Newport Beach, California,
United States
Occupation Film, television actress
Years active 1939–1965
Spouse(s) Ross Latimer
(m. 1944–1952) (divorced)
Jack Sherman Morrison
(m. 1953–1973) (divorced)
Children 2

Jeanne Carolyn Cagney (March 25, 1919 – December 7, 1984) was an American film and television actress.

Early years[edit]

Born in New York City, Cagney and her four older brothers were raised by her widowed mother. Two of the brothers were film actor James Cagney and actor/producer William Cagney.[1] She attended Hunter College High School. Majoring in French and German,[2] she was a cum laude graduate of Hunter College of City College of New York and a member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. She also starred in plays produced by the college's dramatic society.[3] Following her college graduation, she studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse.[1]

Stage[edit]

Cagney was one of the stars of the original production of The Iceman Cometh on Broadway.[1]

Film[edit]

After being heard by a scout while appearing on Bing Crosby's radio program, Cagney had a film test with RKO Pictures. However, she signed a long-term contract with Paramount Pictures.[3] She appeared in 19 films between 1939 and 1965, including four films with James Cagney: Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), The Time of Your Life (1948), A Lion Is in the Streets (1953) and Man of a Thousand Faces (1957). Cagney gave a noted performance opposite Mickey Rooney in Quicksand (1950). In 1946 Eugene O'Neill cast her as Maggie in his play "The Iceman Cometh."

Radio[edit]

Most of Cagney's appearances on radio were as a guest in dramatic programs as noted below. She briefly played the title role in the soap opera The Romance of Helen Trent.[4]

Television[edit]

In addition, she also served as the fashion commentator of Queen for a Day,[5] hosted by Jack Bailey on NBC and ABC from 1956 to 1963. This "game show" is regarded as a forerunner of today's reality shows. Cagney hosted segments providing tips on style and introducing the latest fashions.

In 1954, Cagney made a pilot for a mystery series, Satan's Waiting,, but it apparently was not sold.[6]

Family[edit]

Cagney married actor Ross Latimer (also known as Kim Spaulding) in 1944. She was divorced from him March 9, 1951. They had no children.[7] She married Jack Morrison, a faculty member in theater arts at UCLA,[5] on June 6, 1953;[8] they had two daughters, Mary and Terry.[5]

Death[edit]

Cagney died in Newport Beach, California from lung cancer, aged 65.[1] Survivors included brothers Bill and James Cagney, daughters Theresa Cagney and Mary Anne Roberts, and a grandson.[1]

Radio appearances[edit]

Year Program Episode/source
1942 Armstrong's Theatre of Today NA[9]
1942 Screen Guild Players Yankee Doodle Dandy[10]
1944 Silver Theater Wanted -- Adventure for Two[11]
1944 Kate Smith Hour Till We Meet Again[12]
1945 Grand Central Station NA[13]
1946 Grand Central Station A Lion Is in the Streets[14]
1952 Family Theater The Red Head[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Actress Jeanne Cagney Morrison, 65". Chicago Tribune. December 11, 1984. p. 14 - Section 2. Retrieved 31 May 2015. 
  2. ^ Ferguson, Betty Jane (June 9, 1938). "Movie Tough Guy's Sister Knows He Is Only Putting on a Good Act". The Piqua Daily Call. p. 18. Retrieved May 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  3. ^ a b "At Last Jeanne Cagney Has A Role That Suits Her Name". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. November 7, 1943. p. 31. Retrieved May 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  4. ^ Wolters, Larry (July 19, 1953). "Helen Trent's Romance Now 20 Years Old". Chicago Sunday Tribune. Retrieved 31 May 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Thompson, Ruth E. (June 13, 1964). "TV Rates with Jeanne Cagney". Simpson's Leader-Times. p. 13. Retrieved May 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  6. ^ "Malone Firm To Produce Mystery Films". Billboard. November 27, 1954. p. 5. Retrieved 31 May 2015. 
  7. ^ "Jeanne Cagney Wins Divorce". The Ogden Standard-Examiner. March 9, 1951. p. 15. Retrieved May 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  8. ^ "Jeanne Cagney Weds". The Anniston Star. June 7, 1953. p. 1. Retrieved May 30, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  9. ^ "Jeanne Cagney Guest Star on Theatre of Today". Harrisburg Telegraph. June 20, 1942. p. 24. Retrieved May 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  10. ^ "Players to Open Season With 'Yankee Doodle Dandy'". Harrisburg Telegraph. October 17, 1942. p. 19. Retrieved May 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  11. ^ "Jeanne Cagney Guest on Silver Theater Hour". Chicago Tribune. July 9, 1944. p. Part 3 - Page 4. Retrieved 31 May 2015. 
  12. ^ "Comedy". The Lincoln Star. September 24, 1944. p. 28. Retrieved May 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  13. ^ "Jeanne Cagney On WSOY". The Decatur Herald. May 12, 1945. p. 6. Retrieved May 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  14. ^ "Jeanne Cagney in St. Patrick Story, On 'Grand Central'". Harrisburg Telegraph. March 16, 1946. p. 21. Retrieved May 31, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  15. ^ Kirby, Walter (February 24, 1952). "Better Radio Programs for the Week". The Decatur Daily Review. p. 38. Retrieved May 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read

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