Jeanne Hardebeck

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Jeanne Hardebeck
Alma materPh.D in Geophysics, Caltech 2001
OccupationResearch Geophysicist
EmployerUnited States Geological Survey
Notable work
The Tectonic History of the Tasman Sea: A Puzzle with 13 Pieces

A New Method for Determining First-Motion Focal Mechanisms

The Static Stress Change Triggering Model: Constraints from Two Southern California Aftershock Sequences

Implications for prediction and hazard assessment from the 2004 Parkfield earthquake
AwardsCharles F Richter Early Career Award, 2006

James B Macelwane Medal, 2007

Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, 2009

Jeanne Hardebeck is an expert in earthquakes and seismology. She has a Ph.D. in Geophysics and has worked as a Research Geophysicist for the United States Geological Survey (USGS) since 2004.[1] Throughout her career, Hardebeck has dedicated herself to her work and has provided critical contributions to her field including the development of new research methods to better understand issues such as the state of stress and the strength of faults.[2]

Education and career[edit]

Hardebeck received her B.A. in computer science from Cornell University in 1993.[1] She went on to receive her M.S. in Geophysics from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1997 and her Ph.D in Geophysics from Caltech in 2001.[1] Between 1994 and 2000, Hardebeck served as a Graduate Research Assistant at Caltech for her advisor, Egill Hauksson.[1][3] After receiving her Ph.D., she served as a Green Postdoctoral Scholar for the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at U.C. San Diego (2000 and 2003).[1] She was a Mendenhall Postdoctoral Scholar for the USGS Earthquakes Hazard Team (2003 and 2004), collaborating with Andrew Michael. She started as a Research Geophysicist for the USGS Earthquakes Hazard Team in 2004.[1][4]

Research[edit]

Hardebeck's area of research focuses around crustal stress and the strength of faults, earthquake statistics, and the testing of earthquake forecasting methods.[1] Her research is noted for the clarity it provides on issues such as the strength of faults and the state of stress that were previously clouded by assumptions and unreliable data.[2] Her investigative methods have been practiced by other experts in the seismic community and she has kept a continual focus on data when developing new methods to infer the state of stress of seismogenic processes.[2][5][6] Hardebeck has collaborated with other experts in her field to publish research articles which have been cited a total of 4123 times on Google Scholar.[7] Her most cited paper titled "The Tectonic History of the Tasman Sea: A Puzzle with 13 Pieces" analyzed tectonic events in the Tasman Sea and determined its tectonic evolution.[8] Using this information, Hardebeck looked back upon the opening stages of the Tasman Sea and described the dispersal of its tectonic elements at the time.[8] Her second most cited paper titled "A New Method for Determining First-Motion Focal Mechanisms" introduced a method that takes into consideration potential mistakes in the assumed earthquake location and seismic-velocity model when determining earthquake focal mechanisms.[9]

Notable publications[edit]

  • The Tectonic History of the Tasman Sea: A Puzzle with 13 Pieces[8]
  • A New Method for Determining First-Motion Focal Mechanisms[9]
  • The Static Stress Change Triggering Model: Constraints from Two Southern California Aftershock Sequences[10]
  • Implications for prediction and hazard assessment from the 2004 Parkfield earthquake[11]

Awards and recognition[edit]

The awards that Hardebeck has received acknowledge the importance of her ongoing efforts to focus on and better understand issues that for a long time were not well interpreted or understood.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Jeanne Hardebeck". www.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2018-11-05.
  2. ^ a b c d "Jeanne Hardebeck – Seismological Society of America". www.seismosoc.org. Retrieved 2018-11-05.
  3. ^ "Egill Hauksson, Caltech - People". web.gps.caltech.edu. Retrieved 2018-11-08.
  4. ^ "Project Profiles: Jeanne Hardebeck". geology.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  5. ^ Communications, Office of. "USGS Release: USGS Scientists Receive Presidential Recognition (12/12/2010 8:31:33 AM)". archive.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2018-11-08.
  6. ^ a b Michael, Andrew. "Jeanne Hardebeck - Honors Program". Honors Program. US Geological Survey. Retrieved 2018-11-08.
  7. ^ "Jeanne Hardebeck - Google Scholar Citations". scholar.google.com. Retrieved 2018-11-05.
  8. ^ a b c Hardebeck, Jeanne (1998). "The tectonic history of the Tasman Sea: a puzzle with 13 pieces" (PDF). Journal of Geophysical Research. 103: 12413–12433. doi:10.1029/98JB00386.
  9. ^ a b Hardebeck, Jeanne (2002). "A new method for determining first-motion focal mechanisms" (PDF). Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 92 (6): 2264–2276. doi:10.1785/0120010200 – via GeoScienceWorld.
  10. ^ Hardebeck, Jeanne (1998). "The static stress change triggering model: Constraints from two southern California aftershock sequences". Journal of Geophysical Research. 103: 24427–24437. doi:10.1029/98JB00573.
  11. ^ Hardebeck, Jeanne (2005). "Implications for prediction and hazard assessment from the 2004 Parkfield earthquake" (PDF). Nature. 437 (7061): 969–974. doi:10.1038/nature04067. PMID 16222291 – via Colorado Alliance of Research Lib.
  12. ^ Emerald, Elizabeth. "Jeanne Hardebeck (Ph.D. '01) Receives Presidential Recognition". Caltech Alumni Association. Retrieved 2018-11-08.
  13. ^ Weiss, Rick. "President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists". The White House. Retrieved 2018-11-08.