Jena Osman

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Jena Osman is an American poet and editor, who graduated from Brown University, and the State University of New York at Buffalo, with a Ph.D. She teaches at Temple University.[1] Osman's work has appeared in American Letters & Commentary, Conjunctions,[2] Hambone, Verse, and XCP: Cross-Cultural Poetics.

With Juliana Spahr, she founded and edited Chain. She has been a writing fellow at the MacDowell Colony, the Blue Mountain Center, the Djerassi Foundation, and Chateau de la Napoule. She inspired the start of Hyphen magazine.[3]

In her ongoing project, "Court Reports," Osman worked directly from court records, judicial opinions bearing the stamp and influence of Charles Reznikoff.[4]

Awards[edit]

Works[edit]

  • The Network. Fence Books. 2010. ISBN 978-1-934200-40-7.
  • "flag of my disposition"; "hurrah for positive science", 5 Trope
  • "THE PERIODIC TABLE AS ASSEMBLED BY DR. ZHIVAGO, OCULIST", Zhivago, 2002-3
  • An Essay in Asterisks. Roof Books. 2004. ISBN 978-1-931824-10-1.
  • The Character. Beacon Press. 1999. ISBN 978-0-8070-6848-9.
  • Jury. Meow Press. 1996.
  • Amblyopia. Avenue B. 1993. ISBN 978-0-939691-09-8.
  • Twelve Parts of Her. Burning Deck Press. 1989. ISBN 978-1-886224-48-3.

Anthologies[edit]

Reviews[edit]

Now we have Jena Osman’s new book, An Essay in Asterisks, which I necessarily read with a more open mind, but I do think this is a much richer book than The Character, more generous in its pleasures. Here she is again probing consciousness and politics and language in a variety of inventive ways. These tricks might be called wordplay but the end is anything but playful.[7]

References[edit]

External links[edit]