Jennifer Moyle

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Jennifer Moyle (born April 30, 1921)[1] is a biochemist who worked alongside Peter D. Mitchell and helped discover the chemiosmotic mechanism of ATP synthesis. She also did work on the properties of purified isocitric enzymes.[2]

She was born in Norwich, England.

Biography[edit]

Jennifer Moyle is a biochemist born in Norwich, England in 1921.[3] She is the daughter of S. H. Leonard Moyle and Olive M. Dakin. She also has a sister named Vivian, who also studied biochemistry.

Jennifer Moyle began schooling at Norwich High School in 1926 where she remained until entering Girton College of Cambridge University in 1939.[4] While studying there she earned a "Title of Bachelor of Arts Degree",[5] the equivalent of modern-day Bachelor of Arts, in 1942. She specialized in Biochemistry, and also attended many lectures on philosophy.

Moyle is credited with having worked with Peter Mitchell on the chemiosmotic mechanism of ATP synthesis,[6] and publishing papers on properties of purified isocitric enzyme.

Military service[edit]

Shortly after earning her degree, Moyle entered the Auxiliary Territorial Service. While there she went straight into military intelligence, where she soon become an intelligence officer in MI8. There she was promoted to second in command of a section dealing with intelligence obtained from ciphers breaking German codes by the British.

After World War II, she continued service for another year helping teach servicemen how to return to civilian life.[7]

Work with purified isocitric enzymes[edit]

Jennifer Moyle published an article on the properties of purified isocitric enzymes in August 1956 with Malcolm Dixon.[8]

Work with Peter Mitchell[edit]

Jennifer Moyle was also a former research colleague of Peter Mitchell, and co-founder to a charitable research company known as Glynn Research Ltd.. She began working with Mitchell closely between 1948 and 1952.

Moyle and Mitchell founded Glynn Research in 1964, to promote biological research, however actually laboratory work did not begin until 1965.

Moyle worked for many years with Mitchell on his hypothesis on Chemiosmotic Theory. She proved to be an important associate, designing many of the experiments needed to test the hypothesis, and helped earn Mitchell the Nobel Prize in 1978.

There had been earlier work by Peter Mitchell and Jennifer Moyle that had indicated that the walls of Gram-positive bacteria contained phosphate derivatives.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Who's Who of British Scientists 1980/81. 3rd ed. Simon Books Limited. 1980. p. 349. ISBN 0862290015. 
  2. ^ "Some properties of purified isocitric enzyme". Biochem. J. 63: 552–8. 2010-09-03. PMC 1216217free to read. PMID 13355849. 
  3. ^ "Chronolgy". SC San Diego. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  4. ^ Wandering in the gardens of the mind ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2010-10-05. 
  5. ^ Temple, William. "Chapter 4. Undergraduate Student Days at Cambridge". SC San Diego. Retrieved 5 October 2010. 
  6. ^ "Peter D. Mitchell Biography". BookRags.com. Retrieved 2010-10-05. 
  7. ^ Wandering in the gardens of the mind ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2010-10-05. 
  8. ^ "Some properties of purified isocitric enzyme". Biochem. J. 63: 552–8. 2010-09-03. PMC 1216217free to read. PMID 13355849. Retrieved 2010-10-05. 
  9. ^ "Professor Sir James Baddiley: Biochemist who applied his understanding of organic chemistry to problems in biology - Obituaries, News". London: The Independent. 2009-01-03. Retrieved 2010-10-05.