Jenny Clack

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Jenny Clack

Born
Jennifer Alice Clack

(1947-11-03)3 November 1947
Died26 March 2020(2020-03-26) (aged 72)
NationalityEnglish
Alma materNewcastle University (BSc, PhD)
University of Leicester
University of Cambridge (MA)
Known forGaining Ground: the Origin and Early Evolution of Tetrapods (2002)
Scientific career
FieldsZoology
Palaeontology
Evolutionary biology
Institutions

Jennifer Alice Clack, FRS, FLS (née Agnew; 3 November 1947 – 26 March 2020) was an English palaeontologist and evolutionary biologist. She specialised in the early evolution of tetrapods, specifically studying the "fish to tetrapod" transition: the origin, evolutionary development and radiation of early tetrapods and their relatives among the lobe-finned fishes. She is best known for her book Gaining Ground: the Origin and Early Evolution of Tetrapods, published in 2002 (second edition, 2012) and written with the layperson in mind.

Clack was curator at the Museum of Zoology and Professor of Vertebrate Palaeontology at the University of Cambridge, where she devoted her career to studying the early development of tetrapods, the "four-legged" animals said to have evolved from Devonian lobe-finned fishes and colonised the freshwater swamps of the Carboniferous period.

Early life and education[edit]

Clack was born on 3 November 1947 to Ernest and Alice Agnew.[1] She was brought up in Manchester, England.[2] She was educated at Bolton School (Girls' Division), an independent school in Bolton, Lancashire. She received a B.Sc. in Zoology from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1970, and a Ph.D. from the University in 1984, where she studied under Alec Panchen. She also held a Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Leicester and an MA from the University of Cambridge. On 9 December 2000, she was awarded a Doctor of Science (ScD) degree by the University of Cambridge.[3]

Academic career[edit]

In 1981, Clack joined the University Museum of Zoology, University of Cambridge, as an Assistant Curator.[1][2] She was promoted to Senior Assistant Curator in 1995. Since 2005, she has been Curator in Vertebrate Palaeontology at the museum.[1] In 2006, she was awarded a personal chair by the University of Cambridge, and took the title Professor of Vertebrate Palaeontology.[4] She retired in 2015 and became Emeritus Professor of Vertebrate Palaeontology at the museum.[5] In 1997, Clack was elected a Fellow of Darwin College, Cambridge;[6] since 1 October 2015, she has been an Emeritus Fellow.[7][8] From 2000 to 2005, she was Reader in Vertebrate Palaeontology at the University of Cambridge.[1] On 1 October 2006, Clack was awarded a personal chair by Cambridge, taking the title Professor of Vertebrate Palaeontology.[1][9]

Clack is best known for her extensive body of work on early tetrapods, much of which redefined how paleontologists conceived of the evolution of limbs and other features associated with tetrapods' transition from other lobe-finned fishes. She began her career working primarily on the ear of early tetrapods[10] and later expanded to more broadly addressing the osteology and evolution of tetrapods. Together with Michael Coates (University of Chicago), Clack defined what is known as "Romer's Gap,"[11] a major gap in the fossil record of early tetrapods and one that she subsequently began to fill in collaboration with other paleontologists. Clack also undertook extensive fieldwork expeditions in order to search for further remains of early tetrapods. In 1987, during an expedition to East Greenland, Clack and her team discovered the remains of the Devonian tetrapods Acanthostega and Ichthyostega, following up on field notes of researchers who had collected material of Acanthostega in 1970.[12] Additional surveys in 1998 led to the collection of substantial new material, including what is now recognized as Ymeria.[13] Most recently, she led a major consortium project (TW:eed[14]) investigating some exciting new fossils from Northumberland and the Borders Region of Scotland which date from the Tournaisian stage of the earliest Carboniferous period; this project has produced numerous publications furthering the understanding of early tetrapod evolution.[15][16][17][18]

Over the course of her lengthy career, Clack published in some of the most notable scientific journals, including Nature,[19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34] Science,[35][36] and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences[37][38] and is one of the most published vertebrate paleontologists in Nature, arguably the leading scientific journal in the world, with over 15 papers in that journal alone. In addition to her Gaining Ground book, Clack also co-authored a volume of the Handbuch der Paläoherpetologie series on early tetrapods with Andrew Milner in 2015[39] and co-edited a volume on the evolution of hearing in 2016.[40]

Clack supervised many graduate students who went on to pursue successful careers in paleontology and evolutionary biology, including Per Ahlberg (Uppsala University), Paul Upchurch (University College London), Michael Lee (Flinders University), and Matthew Friedman (University of Michigan).[5] In April 2012 she was featured in an episode[41] of the BBC television series Beautiful Minds, a set of documentaries about scientists who have made important discoveries. Clack was honored by her peers with a festschrift published in 2019.[5]

Taxa named by Jennifer Clack and colleagues
Year Taxon Authors
2020 Rossichthys clackae gen. et sp. nov Johanson et al[42]
2020 Brittagnathus minutus gen. et sp. nov. Ahlberg & Clack[43]
2019 Parmastega aelidae gen. et sp. nov. Beznosov, Clack, Lukševičs, Ruta & Ahlberg[34]
2019 Limanichthys fraseri gen. et sp. nov. Challands et al.[44]
2018 Celsiodon ahlbergi gen. et sp. nov. Clack, Challands, Smithon & Smithson[45]
2018 Mesanerpeton woodi gen. et sp. nov. Smithson & Clack[46]
2018 Whitropus longicalcus gen. et sp. nov. Richards et al.[47]
2018 Deltodus tubineus sp. nov. Richards et al.[47]
2017 Spathicephalus marsdeni sp. nov. Smithson et al.[48]
2016 Perittodus apsconditus gen. et sp. nov. Clack & Smithson[49]
2016 Koilops herma gen. et sp. nov. Clack & Smithson[49]
2016 Ossirarus kierani gen. et sp. nov. Clack & Smithson[49]
2016 Diploradus austiumensis gen. et sp. nov. Clack & Smithson[49]
2016 Aytonerpeton microps gen. et sp. nov. Clack & Smithson[49]
2015 Ctenodus williei sp. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2015 Ctenodus whitropei sp. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2015 Ctenodus roberti sp. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2015 Xylognathus macrustenus gen. et sp. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2015 Ballagadus rossi gen. et sp. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2015 Ballagadus caustrimi sp. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2015 Coccovedus celatus gen. et sp. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2015 Occludus romeri gen. nov. Smithson, Richards & Clack[50]
2012 Ymeria denticulata gen. et sp. nov. Clack, Ahlberg, Blöm & Finney[51]
2011 Kirktonecta milnerae gen. et sp. nov. Clack[52]
2004 Occidens portlocki gen. et sp. nov. Clack & Ahlberg[53]
2003 Kyrinion martilli gen. et sp. nov. Clack[54]
2002 Pederpes finneyae gen. et sp. nov. Clack[24]
1998 Eucritta melanolimnetes gen. et sp. nov. Clack[23]
1993 Silvanerpeton miripedes gen. et sp. nov. Clack[55]

Death[edit]

Clack died on 26 March 2020 at the age of 72.[56]

Honours[edit]

In 2008, Clack was awarded the Daniel Giraud Elliot Medal from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the first woman to achieve the honor.[57]

In 2009, Clack was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, the first female vertebrate paleontologist to achieve the honor.[58] She has also been elected a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[59]

On 15 June 2013, Clack was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science (DSc) degree by the University of Chicago. The university described her as "an internationally preeminent palaeontologist whose research has profoundly changed the understanding of the origin of terrestrial vertebrate life."[60] Also in 2013, she was awarded the T Neville George Medal by the Geological Society of Glasgow.[61]

On 17 July 2014, she was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree by the University of Leicester.[62] Also in 2014, she was made an Honorary Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.[63]

In 2018, she won the Palaeontological Association's most prestigious award, the Lapworth Medal.[64]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "CLACK, Prof. Jennifer Alice". Who's Who 2015. Oxford University Press. November 2014. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  2. ^ a b Clack, Rob (6 October 2009). "Jenny Clack – Biography". The Clacks. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  3. ^ "Congregation of the Regent House on 9 December 2000". Cambridge University Reporter (5831). 13 December 2000. p. 27. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  4. ^ "Clack, Prof. Jennifer Alice, (born 3 Nov. 1947), Curator in Vertebrate Palaeontology, 2005–15, and Professor, 2006–15, now Professor Emeritus of Vertebrate Palaeontology, University Museum of Zoology, Cambridge; Fellow, Darwin College, Cambridge, 1997–2015, now Emeritus". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. 1 December 2020. doi:10.1093/ww/9780199540884.013.U249891.
  5. ^ a b c Ruta, Marcello; Ahlberg, Per E.; Smithson, Timothy R. (2018). "Fossils, function and phylogeny: Papers on early vertebrate evolution in honour of Professor Jennifer A. Clack – Introduction". Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 109 (1–2): 1–14. doi:10.1017/S1755691019000057. ISSN 1755-6910.
  6. ^ "Darwin College". Cambridge University Reporter (5718). 5 November 1997. p. 24. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  7. ^ "College Notices – Darwin College". Cambridge University Reporter (6396). 23 September 2015. p. 12. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  8. ^ "Master & fellows". Darwin College, Cambridge. University of Cambridge. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  9. ^ "Report of the General Board on Senior Academic Promotions". Cambridge University Reporter (6036). 17 May 2006. p. 17.
  10. ^ Clack, J. A. (1983). "The stapes of the Coal Measures embolomere Pholiderpeton scutigerum Huxley (Amphibia: Anthracosauria) and otic evolution in early tetrapods". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 79 (2): 121–148. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1983.tb01163.x. ISSN 0024-4082.
  11. ^ Coates, Michael I.; Clack, Jennifer A. (1995). "Romer's gap: Tetrapod origins and terrestriality". Bulletin du Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Section C, Sciences de la Terre, Paléontologie, Géologie, Minéralogie. 4e série. 17: 373–388.
  12. ^ "Professor Jennifer Clack (Doctor of Science)". Press Office. University of Leicester. 17 July 2014. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  13. ^ CLACK, JENNIFER A.; AHLBERG, PER E.; BLOM, HENNING; FINNEY, SARAH M. (2012). "A new genus of Devonian tetrapod from North-East Greenland, with new information on the lower jaw of Ichthyostega". Palaeontology. 55 (1): 73–86. doi:10.1111/j.1475-4983.2011.01117.x. ISSN 0031-0239.
  14. ^ "The TWeed project: Evolution's Missing Chapter". National Museums Scotland. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  15. ^ Clack, Jennifer A.; Bennett, Carys E.; Carpenter, David K.; Davies, Sarah J.; Fraser, Nicholas C.; Kearsey, Timothy I.; Marshall, John E. A.; Millward, David; Otoo, Benjamin K. A.; Reeves, Emma J.; Ross, Andrew J. (5 December 2016). "Phylogenetic and environmental context of a Tournaisian tetrapod fauna" (PDF). Nature Ecology & Evolution. 1 (1): 2. doi:10.1038/s41559-016-0002. ISSN 2397-334X. PMID 28812555. S2CID 22421017.
  16. ^ Otoo, Benjamin K. A.; Clack, Jennifer A.; Smithson, Timothy R.; Bennett, Carys E.; Kearsey, Timothy I.; Coates, Michael I. (3 October 2018). "A fish and tetrapod fauna from Romer's Gap preserved in Scottish Tournaisian floodplain deposits". Palaeontology. 62 (2): 225–253. doi:10.1111/pala.12395. ISSN 0031-0239.
  17. ^ Smithson, Timothy R.; Clack, Jennifer A. (2017). "A new tetrapod from Romer's Gap reveals an early adaptation for walking". Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 108 (1): 89–97. doi:10.1017/s1755691018000075. ISSN 1755-6910. S2CID 232149117.
  18. ^ Clack, Jennifer A.; Bennett, Carys E.; Davies, Sarah J.; Scott, Andrew C.; Sherwin, Janet E.; Smithson, Timothy R. (3 January 2019). "A Tournaisian (earliest Carboniferous) conglomerate-preserved non-marine faunal assemblage and its environmental and sedimentological context". PeerJ. 6: e5972. doi:10.7717/peerj.5972. ISSN 2167-8359. PMC 6321757. PMID 30627480.
  19. ^ Clack, J. A. (1989). "Discovery of the earliest-known tetrapod stapes". Nature. 342 (6248): 425–427. Bibcode:1989Natur.342..425C. doi:10.1038/342425a0. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 2586610. S2CID 4348808.
  20. ^ Coates, M. I.; Clack, J. A. (1990). "Polydactyly in the earliest known tetrapod limbs". Nature. 347 (6288): 66–69. Bibcode:1990Natur.347...66C. doi:10.1038/347066a0. ISSN 0028-0836. S2CID 4319165.
  21. ^ Coates, M. I.; Clack, J. A. (1991). "Fish-like gills and breathing in the earliest known tetrapod". Nature. 352 (6332): 234–236. Bibcode:1991Natur.352..234C. doi:10.1038/352234a0. ISSN 0028-0836. S2CID 4340202.
  22. ^ Ahlberg, Per E.; Clack, Jennifer A.; Luks̆evic̆s, Ervīns (1996). "Rapid braincase evolution between Panderichthys and the earliest tetrapods". Nature. 381 (6577): 61–64. Bibcode:1996Natur.381...61A. doi:10.1038/381061a0. ISSN 0028-0836. S2CID 4338219.
  23. ^ a b Clack, Jennifer A. (1998). "A new Early Carboniferous tetrapod with a mélange of crown-group characters". Nature. 394 (6688): 66–69. Bibcode:1998Natur.394...66C. doi:10.1038/27895. ISSN 0028-0836. S2CID 204998306.
  24. ^ a b Clack, J. A. (2002). "An early tetrapod from 'Romer's Gap'". Nature. 418 (6893): 72–76. doi:10.1038/nature00824. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 12097908. S2CID 741732.
  25. ^ Clack, J. A.; Ahlberg, P. E.; Finney, S. M.; Dominguez Alonso, P.; Robinson, J.; Ketcham, R. A. (2003). "A uniquely specialized ear in a very early tetrapod". Nature. 425 (6953): 65–69. Bibcode:2003Natur.425...65C. doi:10.1038/nature01904. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 12955140. S2CID 4411060.
  26. ^ Clément, Gaël; Ahlberg, Per E.; Blieck, Alain; Blom, Henning; Clack, Jennifer A.; Poty, Edouard; Thorez, Jacques; Janvier, Philippe (2004). "Devonian tetrapod from western Europe". Nature. 427 (6973): 412–413. doi:10.1038/427412a. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 14749820. S2CID 4414996.
  27. ^ Ahlberg, Per Erik; Clack, Jennifer A.; Blom, Henning (2005). "The axial skeleton of the Devonian tetrapod Ichthyostega". Nature. 437 (7055): 137–140. Bibcode:2005Natur.437..137A. doi:10.1038/nature03893. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 16136143. S2CID 4370488.
  28. ^ Ahlberg, Per Erik; Clack, Jennifer A. (2006). "A firm step from water to land". Nature. 440 (7085): 748–749. doi:10.1038/440747a. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 16598240. S2CID 4392361.
  29. ^ Ahlberg, Per E.; Clack, Jennifer A.; Lukševičs, Ervīns; Blom, Henning; Zupiņš, Ivars (2008). "Ventastega curonica and the origin of tetrapod morphology". Nature. 453 (7199): 1199–1204. Bibcode:2008Natur.453.1199A. doi:10.1038/nature06991. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 18580942. S2CID 4344417.
  30. ^ Pierce, Stephanie E.; Clack, Jennifer A.; Hutchinson, John R. (23 May 2012). "Three-dimensional limb joint mobility in the early tetrapod Ichthyostega". Nature. 486 (7404): 523–526. Bibcode:2012Natur.486..523P. doi:10.1038/nature11124. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 22722854. S2CID 3127857.
  31. ^ Pierce, Stephanie E.; Ahlberg, Per E.; Hutchinson, John R.; Molnar, Julia L.; Sanchez, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Clack, Jennifer A. (13 January 2013). "Vertebral architecture in the earliest stem tetrapods". Nature. 494 (7436): 226–229. Bibcode:2013Natur.494..226P. doi:10.1038/nature11825. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 23334417. S2CID 4329395.
  32. ^ Clack, Jennifer A. (2015). "The origin of terrestrial hearing". Nature. 519 (7542): 168–169. doi:10.1038/519168a. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 25762279. S2CID 4392314.
  33. ^ Sanchez, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Clack, Jennifer A.; Ahlberg, Per E. (2016). "Life history of the stem tetrapod Acanthostega revealed by synchrotron microtomography". Nature. 537 (7620): 408–411. Bibcode:2016Natur.537..408S. doi:10.1038/nature19354. ISSN 0028-0836. PMC 6485594. PMID 27602519.
  34. ^ a b Beznosov, Pavel A.; Clack, Jennifer A.; Lukševičs, Ervīns; Ruta, Marcello; Ahlberg, Per Erik (2019). "Morphology of the earliest reconstructable tetrapod Parmastega aelidae" (PDF). Nature. 574 (7779): 527–531. Bibcode:2019Natur.574..527B. doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1636-y. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 31645719. S2CID 204848799.
  35. ^ Clack, J. A. (2 April 2004). "PALEONTOLOGY: Enhanced: From Fins to Fingers". Science. 304 (5667): 57–58. doi:10.1126/science.1096415. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 15060312. S2CID 82119710.
  36. ^ Callier, V.; Clack, J. A.; Ahlberg, P. E. (17 April 2009). "Contrasting Developmental Trajectories in the Earliest Known Tetrapod Forelimbs". Science. 324 (5925): 364–367. Bibcode:2009Sci...324..364C. doi:10.1126/science.1167542. ISSN 0036-8075. PMID 19372425. S2CID 28461841.
  37. ^ Smithson, T. R.; Wood, S. P.; Marshall, J. E. A.; Clack, J. A. (5 March 2012). "Earliest Carboniferous tetrapod and arthropod faunas from Scotland populate Romer's Gap". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 109 (12): 4532–4537. Bibcode:2012PNAS..109.4532S. doi:10.1073/pnas.1117332109. ISSN 0027-8424. PMC 3311392. PMID 22393016.
  38. ^ Neenan, James M.; Ruta, Marcello; Clack, Jennifer A.; Rayfield, Emily J. (22 April 2014). "Feeding biomechanics in Acanthostega and across the fish–tetrapod transition". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 281 (1781): 20132689. doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.2689. ISSN 0962-8452. PMC 3953833. PMID 24573844.
  39. ^ "Basal Tetrapoda". Dr. Friedrich Pfeil Publishing. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  40. ^ Clack, Jennifer A.; Fay, Richard R; Popper, Arthur N., eds. (2016). Evolution of the Vertebrate Ear. Springer Handbook of Auditory Research. 59. Cham: Springer International Publishing. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-46661-3. ISBN 978-3-319-46659-0. S2CID 36018536.
  41. ^ "Professor Jenny Clack" at BBC Programmes
  42. ^ Johanson, Zerina; Jeffery, Jonathan; Challands, Tom; Pierce, Stephanie; Clack, Jennifer (27 October 2020). "A New Look At Carboniferous Rhizodontid Humeri (Sarcopterygii; Tetrapodomorpha)". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1813150 (3): e1813150. doi:10.1080/02724634.2020.1813150. S2CID 227241079.
  43. ^ Ahlberg, Per E.; Clack, Jennifer A. (2020). "The smallest known Devonian tetrapod shows unexpectedly derived features". Royal Society Open Science. 7 (4): 192117. Bibcode:2020RSOS....792117A. doi:10.1098/rsos.192117. ISSN 2054-5703. PMC 7211834. PMID 32431888.
  44. ^ Challands, Tom J.; Smithson, Timothy R.; Clack, Jennifer A.; Bennett, Carys E.; Marshall, John E. A.; Wallace-Johnson, Sarah M.; Hill, Henrietta (11 March 2019). "A lungfish survivor of the end-Devonian extinction and an Early Carboniferous dipnoan radiation". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 17 (21): 1825–1846. doi:10.1080/14772019.2019.1572234. ISSN 1477-2019. S2CID 91623116.
  45. ^ Clack, Jennifer Alice; Challands, Thomas James; Smithson, Timothy Richard; Smithson, Keturah Zoe (2 November 2018). "Newly recognized Famennian lungfishes from East Greenland reveal tooth plate diversity and blur the Devonian–Carboniferous boundary". Papers in Palaeontology. 5 (2): 261–279. doi:10.1002/spp2.1242. ISSN 2056-2802.
  46. ^ Smithson, Timothy R.; Clack, Jennifer A. (2017). "A new tetrapod from Romer's Gap reveals an early adaptation for walking". Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 108 (1): 89–97. doi:10.1017/S1755691018000075. ISSN 1755-6910. S2CID 232149117.
  47. ^ a b Richards, Kelly R.; Sherwin, Janet E.; Smithson, Timothy R.; Bennion, Rebecca F.; Davies, Sarah J.; Marshall, John E. A.; Clack, Jennifer A. (2017). "Diverse and durophagous: Early Carboniferous chondrichthyans from the Scottish Borders". Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 108 (1): 67–87. doi:10.1017/s1755691018000166. ISSN 1755-6910. S2CID 133929085.
  48. ^ Smithson, Timothy R.; Browne, Michael A. E.; Davies, Sarah J.; Marshall, John E. A.; Millward, David; Walsh, Stig A.; Clack, Jennifer A. (2017). "A new Mississippian tetrapod from Fife, Scotland, and its environmental context". Papers in Palaeontology. 3 (4): 547–557. doi:10.1002/spp2.1086. ISSN 2056-2802.
  49. ^ a b c d e Clack, Jennifer A.; Bennett, Carys E.; Carpenter, David K.; Davies, Sarah J.; Fraser, Nicholas C.; Kearsey, Timothy I.; Marshall, John E. A.; Millward, David; Otoo, Benjamin K. A.; Reeves, Emma J.; Ross, Andrew J. (5 December 2016). "Phylogenetic and environmental context of a Tournaisian tetrapod fauna" (PDF). Nature Ecology & Evolution. 1 (1): 2. doi:10.1038/s41559-016-0002. ISSN 2397-334X. PMID 28812555. S2CID 22421017.
  50. ^ a b c d e f g h Smithson, Timothy R.; Richards, Kelly R.; Clack, Jennifer A. (2016). "Lungfish diversity in Romer's Gap: reaction to the end-Devonian extinction". Palaeontology. 59 (1): 29–44. doi:10.1111/pala.12203. ISSN 1475-4983.
  51. ^ Clack, Jennifer A.; Ahlberg, Per E.; Blom, Henning; Finney, Sarah M. (2012). "A new genus of Devonian tetrapod from North-East Greenland, with new information on the lower jaw of Ichthyostega: A NEW GENUS OF DEVONIAN TETRAPOD". Palaeontology. 55 (1): 73–86. doi:10.1111/j.1475-4983.2011.01117.x.
  52. ^ Clack, Jennifer A. (2011). "A new microsaur from the early carboniferous (Viséan) of East Kirkton, Scotland, showing soft tissue evidence". Special Papers in Palaeontology. 29: 45–55.
  53. ^ Clack, Jennifer A.; Ahlberg, Erik (2004). Arratia, G.; Wilson, M.V.H.; Cloutier, R. (eds.). A new stem tetrapod from the Early Carboniferous of Northern Ireland. Recent Advances in the Origin and Early Radiation of Vertebrates. München: Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil. pp. 309–320.
  54. ^ Clack, J A (1 April 2003). "A new baphetid (stem tetrapod) from the Upper Carboniferous of Tyne and Wear, U.K., and the evolution of the tetrapod occiput". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 40 (4): 483–498. Bibcode:2003CaJES..40..483C. doi:10.1139/e02-065. ISSN 0008-4077.
  55. ^ Clack, J. A. (1993). "Silvanerpeton miripedes, a new anthracosauroid from the Viséan of East Kirkton, West Lothian, Scotland". Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 84 (3–4): 369–376. doi:10.1017/s0263593300006179. ISSN 1755-6910.
  56. ^ Aucott, Rachel (26 March 2020). "Professor Jenny Clack, FRS, 1947-2020". www.zoo.cam.ac.uk. Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  57. ^ "Daniel Giraud Elliot Medal". National Academy of Sciences. Archived from the original on 29 December 2010. Retrieved 15 February 2011.
  58. ^ "Jennifer Clack". Fellows Directory. The Royal Society. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  59. ^ "Featured Scientists | Your Inner Fish | PBS". www.pbs.org. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  60. ^ Koppes, Steve; Allen, Susie (15 May 2013). "University to bestow five honorary degrees at 515th Convocation". U Chicago News. The University of Chicago. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  61. ^ "Two awards". University of Cambridge - Department of Zoology. 4 July 2013. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  62. ^ "Figures from public life to be honoured by University of Leicester". University of Leicester. 10 July 2014. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  63. ^ "Six new members elected to the Academy".
  64. ^ "Professor Jenny Clack awarded the Palaeontological Association's Lapworth Medal". University of Cambridge - Department of Zoology. 18 December 2015. Retrieved 28 March 2020.

External links[edit]