Jeremy Reed (writer)

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Jeremy Reed (born 1951) is a Jersey-born writer, poet and prose stylist.

Career[edit]

Reed has published over 50 works in 25 years. He has written more than two dozen books of poetry, 12 novels, and volumes of literary and music criticism.[1][2] He has also published translations of Montale, Cocteau, Nasrallah, Adonis, Bogary and Hölderlin. His own work has been translated abroad in more than a dozen languages. He has received awards from Somerset Maugham, Eric Gregory,[3] Ingram Merrill, Royal Literary Fund and the Arts Council.[4] He has also won the Poetry Society's European Translation Prize.[citation needed]

Reed began publishing poems in magazines and small publications in the 1970s.[5] His influences include Rimbaud, Artaud, Jean Genet, J.G. Ballard, David Bowie and Iain Sinclair.[6] Reed has a long history of publication with both Creation Books, Enitharmon Press, Shearsman Books and Peter Owen, however his Selected Poems is published by Penguin Books. His recent art criticism appears in Cornermag: 'Gareth Lloyd Leaving the 20th Century'. A recent novel was The Grid.

He has collaborated with the musician Itchy Ear.[7][8] They perform live under the name The Ginger Light.[9] The Ginger Light regularly perform at The National Portrait Gallery, London and The Horse Hospital, London.

Reed's BA (hons) is from the University of Essex[10] and he has occasionally taught at that institution and at the University of London.

Collections of Poetry[edit]

  • Target (1972)
  • Agate Paws (1975)
  • Diseased Near Deceased (1975)
  • Emerald Cat (1975)
  • The Priapic Beatitudes, the Bat in Violet Lenses, a Phallic Descant: 1 Runic Epiphanies to a Jade Novella (1975)
  • Ruby Onocentaur: Six Poems (1975)
  • Count Bluebeard (1976)
  • Blue Talaria (1976)
  • Green: Miscellanea (1976)
  • Isthmus of Samuel Greenberg (1976)
  • Night Attack (1976)
  • Saints and Psychotics: Poems, 1973–74 (1979)
  • Bleecker Street (1980)
  • Walk On Through (1980)
  • Man Afraid (1982)
  • A Long Shot to Heaven (1982)
  • The Secret Ones (1983)
  • By the Fisheries (1984)
  • Nero (1985)
  • Elegy for Senta (1985)
  • Skies (1985)
  • Border Pass (1986)
  • Selected Poems (1987)
  • Escaped Image (1988)
  • Engaging Form (1988)
  • Prayer (1988)
  • The Thread: Written for Kathleen Raines 80th Birthday (1988)
  • Madness: The Price of Poetry (1989)
  • To Celebrate John Ashbery (1989)
  • The Coastguard's House (1990) (with Eugenio Montale)
  • The Nineties (1990)
  • Dicing for Pearls (1990)
  • Lorcas Death (1990)
  • Sky Writing (1990)
  • Nasturtiums (1991)
  • Anastasia in Purple Leopard Spots (1992)
  • Volcano Smoke At Diamond Beach (1992)
  • Red-Haired Android (1992)
  • Black Sugar (1992)
  • Around the Day, Alice (1992)
  • Artaud (1993)
  • Lying Down (1993)
  • Turkish Delight: Torriano Meeting House Poetry Pamphlet (1994)
  • Torch Lighters (1994)
  • Kicks (1995)
  • Red Hot Lipstick: Erotic Stories (1995)
  • Bitter Blue (1995)
  • Listening to Marc Almond (1995)
  • Sweet Sister Lyric (1996)
  • Pop Poems (1997)
  • Angel (1998)
  • Brigitte's Blue Heart (1998)
  • Claudia Schiffer's Red Shoes (1998)
  • For John Heath-Stubbs at eighty (1998)
  • Just Out of Reach (1999)
  • Quentin Crisp as Prime Minister (1999)
  • Patron Saint of Eye-liner (2000)
  • Heartbreak Hotel (2002)
  • Perry Blake (2003)
  • Duck and Sally on the Inside (2004)
  • Kiss the Whip (2005) (with Robert Bloch, Henry Clement, Jean-Paul Denard, Richard Matheson)
  • This Is How You Disappear: A Book of Elegies (2007)
  • Piccadilly Bongo (2010)
  • The Black Book (2016)

Criticism & Non-Fiction[edit]

  • Homage to David Gascoyne (1990)
  • Lipstick, Sex and Poetry (1991)
  • Delirium: An Interpretation of Arthur Rimbaud (1991)
  • Segmenting the Black Orange (1994)
  • Waiting for the Man: Biography and Critical Study of Lou Reed (1994)
  • Blue Sonata: The Poetry of John Ashbery (1994)
  • The Last Star: A Study of Marc Almond (1995)
  • The Angel in Poetry (1998)
  • Scott Walker: Another Tear Falls (1998)
  • Brian Jones: The Last Decadent (1999)
  • Angels, Divas and Blacklisted Heroes (1999)
  • Caligula: Divine Carnage (2000) (with Stephen Barber)
  • Marc Almond: Adored and Explored (2001)
  • Saint Billie (2002)
  • It Had to Be You: The Poetry of John Wieners (2004)
  • Jean Genet: Born to Lose (2005)
  • Orange Sunshine: The Party That Lasted a Decade (2006)
  • A Stranger On the Earth: The Life and Work of Anna Kavan (2006)
  • The Dilly: A Secret History of Piccadilly Rent Boys[11](2014)

Novels[edit]

  • The Lipstick Boys (1984)
  • Blue Rock (1987)
  • Red Eclipse (1989)
  • Inhabiting Shadows (1990)
  • Isidore: A Novel About the Comte de Lautréamont (1991)
  • When the Whip Comes Down (1992)
  • Diamond Nebula (1994)
  • Chasing Black Rainbows (1994)
  • The Pleasure Chateau (1995)
  • The Sun King: Elvis – the Second Coming (1997)
  • Dorian: A Sequel to the Picture of Dorian Grey (1997)
  • Sister Midnight (1998)
  • The Purple Room (2000)
  • Boy Caesar (2003)
  • The Grid (2008)
  • Here Comes the Nice (2011)[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jeremy Reed – About the Author". Shearsman Books. Shearsman Books. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  2. ^ "Enitharmon Authors Jeremy Reed". Enitharmon. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  3. ^ "The Eric Gregory Trust Fund Awards – Past Winners". Society of Authors. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  4. ^ "Literary cash boost for authors". BBC News. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  5. ^ Lachman, Gary (30 July 2006). "Jeremy Reed: A supernova in orange and purple ink". The Independent. London: INM. ISSN 0951-9467. OCLC 185201487. Retrieved 29 April 2011. 
  6. ^ Marshall, Richard (December 2005). "Dreaming with his eyes open". 3:AM Magazine. Retrieved 30 July 2011. 
  7. ^ "Big City Dilemma – Jeremy Reed and Itchy Ear". michael9murray.wordpress.com. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  8. ^ Reed, Jeremy. "The Ginger Light". Jeremy Reed, Poet. Retrieved April 17, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Big City Dilemma – Jeremy Reed & The Ginger Light". Cherry Red Records. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  10. ^ Oxford University Press. "Jeremy Reed". Oxford Reference (Oxford Companion to Twentieth-Century Literature in English). Retrieved April 17, 2016. 
  11. ^ "The Dilly: A Secret History of Piccadilly Rent Boys Jeremy Reed". Peter Owen Publishers /. Peter Owen. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  12. ^ "Here Comes the Nice". Publishers Weekly. 19 September 2011. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  13. ^ Darren Richard Carlaw (21 October 2011). "Here Comes the Nice". New York Journal of Books. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 

External links[edit]