Jerry Izenberg

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Jerry Izenberg (born September 10, 1930 in Newark, New Jersey[1]) is a sports journalist with The Newark Star-Ledger in Newark, New Jersey. His career with The Star-Ledger began in 1951 while he was still a student at Rutgers University, Newark,[2] but was interrupted for several years during which he served in the Korean War. Izenberg has covered many memorable sporting events and figures of the late twentieth century, including Sonny Werblin's ownership of the New York Jets, the boxing career of Muhammad Ali, and the Loma Prieta earthquake which interrupted the 1989 World Series.[3]

In addition to many magazine articles and newspaper columns, he has also written 13 books, his most recent one being "Once There Were Giants: The Golden Age of Heavyweight Boxing".[4] Izenberg has been the writer, narrator, or producer (sometimes all three) of 35 network television documentaries. One of those shows, "A Man Called Lombardi," earned an Emmy nomination.[citation needed]

In 1997, Izenberg was inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame of New Jersey and in 2000 he won the Red Smith Award from the Associated Press Sports Editors. He was a 2000 inductee of the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of Fame. In 2016, he was inducted into the Boxing Hall of Fame. In 2019, he was inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame.[5]

To commemorate 55 years in journalism, Izenberg wrote an eight-part memoir for The Star-Ledger in 2006. He was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 2016.[6]

Izenberg covered every Super Bowl from Super Bowl I in 1967 through Super Bowl LIII.[7] He declined to attend Super Bowl LIV, bringing an end to his streak.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jerry Izenberg". sports.nyhistory.org. New York Historical Society. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  2. ^ Politi, Steve. "Jerry Izenberg to be inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame". nj.com. Advance Local Media, LLC. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  3. ^ Politi, Steve. "Jerry Izenberg to be inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame". nj.com. Advance Local Media, LLC. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  4. ^ Kantowski, Ron. "Jerry Izenberg's new's boxing book chronicles golden age of the heavyweights". reviewjournal.com. Las Vegas Review-Journal, Inc. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  5. ^ Izenberg, Jerry. "Jerry Izenberg on his induction into N.J. Hall of Fame: It's good to be home (but I never left)". nj.com. Advance Local Media LLC. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  6. ^ "International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame - Elected Members". jewishsports.net. International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  7. ^ https://www.crainsdetroit.com/sports/jerry-green-super-bowl-pressbox-institution-still-going-age-90
  8. ^ Izenberg, Jerry. "'I'm old, not dead': Columnist Jerry Izenberg's historic streak of 53 Super Bowls comes to an end". nj.com. Advance Local Media, LLC. Retrieved 21 September 2020.

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