Jerusalem Gateway

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The Jerusalem Gateway, Rova Mevo Ha'ir in (Hebrew: רובע מבוא העיר), is a project for improving and developing the area that is the main entrance to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv and the coast.[1][2] It is the area where Highway 1 (Israel) enters the city. The project will connect the Jerusalem Central Bus Station, the terminal of the Tel Aviv to Jerusalem railroad, the Jerusalem Light Rail, and the Jerusalem Chords Bridge improving the main entrance to Jerusalem from the west. The program is designed to further the establishment of commercial and residential construction, including construction of two high-rise buildings to expand International Convention Center. All Israel Broadcasting Authority Studios will be concentrated in a new building on the site of "the old Shaare Zedek Hospital" (IBA Complex) Apple Inc. in cooperation with the Jerusalem Municipality plans to build the first digital library in the world on the first new commercial boulevard to be established next to Mishkenot Hauma neighborhood.

A total of 13 high-rise buildings was being projected as of 2011, of which 12 would be commercial and one residential.[3] The project was approved by municipal authorities in 2012.[4] Municipal authorities are hoping that the new development sparks growth in the city's high-tech industry.[5]

Construction program is the main entrance to Jerusalem as a complementary project to Kiryat HaLeom located just south.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Meir, Noam. (October 27, 2016) "New Jerusalem Gateway Business District Project Begins Development". Jewish Business News website Archived 2017-02-14 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  2. ^ Horowitz, David (31 October 2017). "On the fast track to Tel Aviv: A sneak peek at Jerusalem's transport revolution". Times of Israel. Archived from the original on 21 February 2018. Retrieved 19 February 2018.
  3. ^ Smolsky, Raz (30 March 2011). "Jerusalem Planning Cluster of Highrises at Entrance to City". Haaretz. Archived from the original on 20 February 2018. Retrieved 19 February 2018.
  4. ^ Zeiger, Asher (14 August 2012). "New business district to scrape Jerusalem's skies". Times of Israel. Archived from the original on 20 February 2018. Retrieved 19 February 2018.
  5. ^ Eisenbud, Daniel (18 November 2016). "How Jerusalem is seeking to become Israel's new 'start-up city'". Jerusalem Post. Archived from the original on 21 February 2018. Retrieved 19 February 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°47′18.32″N 35°12′2.53″E / 31.7884222°N 35.2007028°E / 31.7884222; 35.2007028