Jesse Owens Award

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The award bears Jesse Owens' name.

The Jesse Owens Award is an annual track and field award that is the highest accolade given out by USA Track and Field (USATF).[1] As the country's highest award for the sport, it bears Jesse Owens' name in recognition of his significant career, which included four gold medals at the 1936 Olympic Games.[2] First awarded in 1981 to hurdler Edwin Moses, it was created to recognize the season's top American performer in track and field competitions. In 1996, the award was divided into two categories, with both a male and female winner. The 1996 winners, Michael Johnson and Gail Devers, each won two gold medals at that year's Olympics in Atlanta.[3] Up to 2008, the award was voted on by members of the United States athletics media only, but in 2009 fans were able to vote via the USA Track and Field website, with their opinions contributing 10% of the overall result.[4]

The winners of the award are typically announced in late November or early December after the end of the outdoor track and field season. A number of athletes have received the award on more than one occasion: Jackie Joyner-Kersee was the first to do so with back-to-back wins in 1986 and 1987, while Carl Lewis won his second award in 1991. Michael Johnson was the first to receive the award three times (winning consecutively from 1994–1996) and Marion Jones became the first woman to collect three awards after wins in 1997, 1998 and 2002. In 2012, Allyson Felix won the award for the fourth time, thus distinguishing herself as the athlete with the most wins. 2014 winners are Mebrahtom Keflezighi and Jennifer Simpson. Winners receive a replica of the award while the original remains on permanent display at the USATF Headquarters in Indianapolis, Indiana.[5]

As of 2013, the female version of the award was renamed the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Athlete of the Year Award.[6] Neither award has been presented since 2015.

List of recipients[edit]

The Jesse Owens Award banquet, 2011
Joan Benoit won in 1984 after winning the first Olympic marathon for women.[7]
Michael Johnson won the award three years running.
Allyson Felix received the award in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012.
Year Male winner Female winner Ref.
1981 Edwin Moses [8]
1982 Carl Lewis [9]
1983 Mary Decker [10]
1984 Joan Benoit [11]
1985 Willie Banks [12]
1986 Jackie Joyner-Kersee [13]
1987 Jackie Joyner-Kersee [13]
1988 Florence Griffith Joyner [14]
1989 Roger Kingdom [15]
1990 Lynn Jennings [16]
1991 Carl Lewis [9]
1992 Kevin Young [17]
1993 Gail Devers [18]
1994 Michael Johnson [19]
1995 Michael Johnson [19]
1996 Michael Johnson Gail Devers [19]
1997 Allen Johnson Marion Jones [20]
1998 John Godina Marion Jones [21]
1999 Maurice Greene Inger Miller [22]
2000 Angelo Taylor Stacy Dragila [23]
2001 John Godina Stacy Dragila [24]
2002 Khalid Khannouchi Deena Kastor [25]
2003 Tom Pappas Deena Kastor [26]
2004 Justin Gatlin Joanna Hayes [27]
2005 Justin Gatlin Allyson Felix [28]
2006 Jeremy Wariner Sanya Richards [29]
2007 Tyson Gay Allyson Felix [30]
2008 Bryan Clay Stephanie Brown Trafton [31]
2009 Tyson Gay Sanya Richards [4]
2010 David Oliver Allyson Felix [5]
2011 Jesse Williams Carmelita Jeter [32]
2012 Ashton Eaton Allyson Felix [33]
Year Jesse Owens Award Jackie Joyner-Kersee Award Ref.
2013 LaShawn Merritt Brianna Rollins [34]
2014 Mebrahtom Keflezighi Jennifer Simpson [35]
2015 Ashton Eaton Allyson Felix [36]
2016 Matthew Centrowitz Michelle Carter [37]
2017 Sam Kendricks Emma Coburn [38]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ "Jesse Owens Award". USA Track and Field. Archived from the original on March 4, 2009. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Gay, Richards win 2009 Jesse Owens Awards". USA Track and Field. November 19, 2009. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Gay, Richards selected USA Athletes of the Year". International Association of Athletics Federations. November 20, 2009. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "Gay, Richards earn 2009 Owens awards". Sydney Morning Herald. November 20, 2009. Archived from the original on August 30, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Felix, Oliver win 2010 Jesse Owens Awards". USA Track and Field. November 16, 2010. Retrieved November 18, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Jesse Owens Award". USA Track & Field. Retrieved October 18, 2017. 
  7. ^ Stewart, Megan (November 3, 2010). "Athletes honoured for their role in women's sports". Vancouver Courier. Archived from the original on March 8, 2012. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  8. ^ "First Jesse Owens Award voted to unbeaten hurdler". Baltimore Afro-American. December 15, 1981. p. 14. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  9. ^ a b "Sports People; Track & Field; Carl Lewis Wins Jesse Owens Award". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 8, 1991. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  10. ^ Woolum, p. 221.
  11. ^ "Benoit wins Owens Award". Anchorage Daily News. December 2, 1984. p. C9. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Sports People; A Triple for Banks". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 8, 1985. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b "Joyner-Kersee wins Owens Award again". Gainesville Sun. December 13, 1987. p. 5E. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Track and Field; Griffith Joyner Is Honored". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. February 22, 1989. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Kingdom wins Owens award". Pittsburgh Press. December 1, 1989. p. C2. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  16. ^ Woolum, p. 154.
  17. ^ "Plus: Track and Field; Hurdler Wins Award". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 6, 1992. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Johnson, Devers win Jesse Owens awards". Lodi News-Sentinel. December 7, 1996. p. 11. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  19. ^ a b c "Johnson, Devers win track awards". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. December 6, 1996. p. 2C. 
  20. ^ "Plus: Roundup – Track and Field; Owens Winners Are Chosen". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 3, 1997. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  21. ^ "Plus: Track; Jones and Godina Are Honored". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 2, 1998. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  22. ^ "Plus: Track and Field; Jesse Owens Awards – Greene and Miller Winners for 1999". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 2, 1999. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  23. ^ Elliott, Helene (December 1, 2000). "Dragila, Taylor Earn Owens Award". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  24. ^ "Plus: Track and Field; Dragila and Godina Win Owens Award". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. November 30, 2001. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  25. ^ "Plus: Track and Field; Training Partners Win Owens Awards". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. December 4, 2002. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  26. ^ "Track Awards Go to Pappas, Drossin Kastor". Los Angeles Times. December 2, 2003. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Gatlin, Hayes capture national awards". Chicago Tribune. November 30, 2004. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  28. ^ "Sports Briefing". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. November 29, 2005. Retrieved November 3, 2009. 
  29. ^ "Jesse Owens Awards go to Richards and Wariner". International Association of Athletics Federations. November 28, 2006. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  30. ^ "Briefs". The Seattle Times. November 20, 2007. Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  31. ^ "Beijing champions Clay and Brown Trafton, winners of 2008 Jesse Owens Awards". International Association of Athletics Federations. November 19, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2010. 
  32. ^ Williams and Jeter win 2011 Jesse Owens Awards. IAAF/USATF (November 8, 2011). Retrieved on November 8, 2011.
  33. ^ Felix and Eaton win 2012 Jesse Owens Award. IAAF (November 13, 2012). Retrieved on November 28, 2012.
  34. ^ Rollins and Merritt win 2013 USATF athlete of the year awards. IAAF (December 2, 2013). Retrieved on February 13, 2014.
  35. ^ "USA Track & Field - Keflezighi, Simpson Named 2014 USATF Jesse Owens and Jackie Joyner-Kersee Athletes of the Year". Usatf.org. 2014-11-17. Retrieved 2015-12-24. 
  36. ^ "Jesse Owens Awards Ceremony celebrates the best of 2015". USATF. December 5, 2015. Archived from the original on September 21, 2016. Retrieved August 22, 2016. 
  37. ^ "USA Track & Field - Best of 2016 celebrated at Jesse Owens Awards". USATF.org. 2016-12-03. Retrieved 2018-07-23. 
  38. ^ "USA Track & Field - Emma Coburn, Sam Kendricks take Jackie Joyner-Kersee Award and Jesse Owens Award as USATF athletes of the year". USATF.org. 2017-11-20. Retrieved 2018-07-23. 

External links[edit]