Jessica Jackson Hutchins

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Jessica Jackson Hutchins
Born 1971
Chicago, IL
Nationality American
Education M.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Post-bacc, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; B.A. in Art History, Oberlin College

Jessica Jackson Hutchins (born 1971) is an American artist from Chicago, Illinois who is based in Portland, Oregon.[1] Her practice consists of large scale ceramics, multi-media installations, assemblage, and paintings all of which utilize found objects such as old furniture, ceramics, worn out clothes, and newspaper clippings. She is most recognizable for her sloppy craft assemblages of furniture and ceramics. Her work was selected for the 2010: Whitney Biennial, featured in major art collections, and has been exhibited throughout the United States and internationally, in Iceland, the UK, and Germany.[2]

Life and work[edit]

Jessica Jackson Hutchins received a BA in Art History from Oberlin College, graduating Cum Laude.[3] In 1997 she finished a Post-Baccalaureate degree at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She went on to receive an MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1999. Though she was in the Painting and Drawing Department, she produced very little paintings as she preferred to work in wire and papier-mâché. Hutchins studied under and was influenced by Susanne Doremus and Gaylen Gerber.[4]

Her use of every day objects has evolved over the years based on her surroundings. In college, she incorporated beer bottles and packaging. After college, coffee cups appeared in her work. Post becoming a mother, she included her children's worn-out clothing.[5] Motherhood and her children have become some of the most influential factors in her work.[6] Much of Hutchin's work is about the domestic sphere and human interaction with forms acting as substitutions for the human form.[5] The furniture pieces used in her work were once in her own home.

The Portland Mercury reported in September 2006 that "her ceramics (steeped in a California funk attitude), papier-mache sculptures, and collages share a crass aesthetic and a preoccupation with the thin line between disaster and success that disguise a genuine attempt to convey ideas about communion, fear, and loneliness." Her show at Reed College's Caseworks drew similar analysis.

Hutchins moved to Berlin in 2011 and returned to making paintings and wall-hung assemblages, having brought almost no materials with her. The paintings utilized everyday household objects such as folding chairs and china plates juxtaposed with transparent linen stretched over window-like frames.[7]

Jessica Jackson Hutchins was included in the 2013 Venice Biennial by curator Massimiliano Gioni. In summer 2016, she was selected by artist and curator Michelle Grabner to participate in the 2016 Portland Biennial.

Personal life[edit]

Hutchins is married to former Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus. They have two children, Lottie and Sunday.[8]

Exhibitions[edit]

2016[edit]

2015[edit]

  • Stanford, CA, Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University, Oshman Family Gallery, Mining the Ancient, October 14, 2015 – August 29, 2016[15]
  • Rome, Italy, Fondazione GIULIANI, Consequences, curated by Jay Heikes, October 9 – December 12[16]
  • Chicago, IL, Kavi Gupta Gallery, Assisted, curated by Jessica Stockholder, September 12, 2015 – January 16, 2016[17]
  • Portland, OR, The Lumber Room and The Cooley Gallery at Reed College, Jessica Jackson Hutchins: Confessions, September 2 – November 8 (solo)[18]
  • New York, Junior Projects, Rock Hound Swap Meet, organized by Randy Wray, July 9 – August 13[19]
  • New York, NY, Marianne Boesky Gallery, I Do Choose, May 9 – June 13 (solo)[20]
  • New York, Jack Hanley Gallery, Zabriskie Point, January 9 – February 8[21]

2014[edit]

2013[edit]

2012[edit]

  • Rome, Brand New Gallery, Changing States of Matter, May 31 – July 28[36]
  • Rome, Federica Schiavo Gallery, Trieste, March 31 – June 23[37]
  • Brussels, Gladstone Gallery, Prima Materia, March 30 – April 28[38]
  • Stamford, Franklin Street Works, House Arrest, April 5 – June 20[39]
  • London, The Saatchi Gallery, Objectified: Sculpture Today[40]

2011[edit]

  • Boston, MA, ICA Boston, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, October 28, 2011 – March 4 (solo)[41]
  • Lyon, France, A Terrible Beauty is Born: 11th Biennale de Lyon, catalogue, September 15 – December 31[42]
  • New York, Laurel Gitlen, Ryan Foerster, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Chadwick Rantanen, September 14 – October 23[43]
  • Seattle, Seattle Art Museum, Reclaimed: Nature and Place Through Contemporary Eyes, June 30 – September 11[44]
  • New York, Salon 94, Paul Clay, June 23 – August 12, 2011[45]
  • Atlanta, GA, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Jessica Jackson Hutchins: The Important Thing About a Chair, April 8 – June 19 (solo)[46]
  • London, Museum 52, Memories Are Made Of This, April 7 – May 12, 2011[47]
  • Portland, OR, Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Here/Now, February 7 – April 2[48]
  • New York, Marianne Boesky Gallery, Dwelling, February 3 – April 2[49]

2010[edit]

2009[edit]

  • Seattle, Western Bridge, Parenthesis, September 25 – December 29[61]
  • Philadelphia, Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania, Dirt on Delight, April 16 – June 21;[62] travelled to Minneapolis, The Dirt On Delight: Impulses That Form Clay, catalogue, July 11 – November 29[63]
  • Portland, OR, The Oregon College of Art and Craft, Bent[64]
  • New York, On Stellar Rays, LOVER, June 20 – July 26[65]
  • New York, David Nolan, Slough, curated by Steve DiBenedetto, May 28 – July 24[66]
  • Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum, An Expanded Field of Possibilities, February 28 – May 24[67]
  • New York, Momenta Art, The Mood Back Home, February 13 – March 16[68]
  • New York, Laurel Gitlen, ARE YOU WITH ME?, January 4 – February 8[69]

2008[edit]

  • Portland, OR, Small A Projects, Hours and Ours, 2008 (solo)[70]
  • Chicago, Rowley Kennerk, Presents, curated by Milwaukee International, December 19, 2008 – January 24, 2009[71]
  • New York, Laurel Gitlen, 200597214100022008, September 12 – October 5, 2008[72]
  • New York, White Columns, Begin Again Right Back There, curated by B. Wurtz, September 10 – October 25, 2008[73]
  • Portland, OR, PDX Contemporary Art, Kinda Like A Buffet, July 1 – August 2, 2008[74]
  • New York, CANADA, Journey to the Center of Uranus, July 11 – August 10, 2008[75]
  • New York, Derek Eller Gallery, Summer Group Exhibition, July 10 – August 15, 2008[76]
  • New York, NY, Derek Eller Gallery, The Exponent of Earth (You Make Me __), May 15 – July 3 (solo)[77]

2007[edit]

2006[edit]

  • Portland, OR, Small A Projects, Peace at Home: The War Never Left (solo) [85]
  • New York, Derek Eller Gallery, Summer Group Exhibition, June 29 - August 13[86]
  • New York, Alexandre Gallery, Your Beauty’s Gold is Clay, June 28 – August 4[87]
  • Portland, OR, Small A Projects, Atlas of the Unknown, 2006[72]
  • New York, Derek Eller Gallery, Jessica Jackson Hutchins Relics from a Lonely Dinner, February 9 - March 11[88]
  • Philadelphia, Institute for Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania, Gone Formalism, January 21 – March 26[89]
  • New York, Derek Eller Gallery, Inaugural Group Exhibition, January 12 - February 4[90]
  • Portland, OR, an event for Ghosttown with Red76,[91] Lonely Dinner[72]

2005[edit]

  • New York, The Sculpture Center, Make it Now, catalogue, May 15 – July 31[92]
  • Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Parisa Kind Gallery, International Laundry[93]
  • New York, EFA, I live in a Castle, curated by Jessica Hutchins and Dan Torop

2004[edit]

  • New York, Derek Eller Gallery, March 18 – April 17 (solo)[94]
  • New York, Champion Fine Art, Escapism: a viable political alternative, curated by Fia Backström, July 22 – August 20[95]
  • London, Anthony Wilkinson Gallery, Five Friends, a film and video 22 program
  • New York, Debs & Co., Art Star/Sausage Factory, April 15 – May 8[96]
  • New York, Lombard-Freid Fine Art, Surface Tension, 2004
  • Kent, UK, Herbert Read Gallery, Ascend to the End

Collections[edit]

Hutchins's work is included in the collections of:

  • Brooklyn Museum, New York[97]
  • The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles[98]
  • The Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • Portland Art Museum, OR[99]
  • Tang Museum, Saratoga Springs, NY
  • Seattle Art Museum, WA[100]
  • Whitney Museum of American Art, New York[101]

Publications[edit]

  • "Confessions" was commissioned as part of Jessica's two-space exhibition of the same name at the lumber room and the Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed College. It was designed by Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Gary Robbins, and Heather Watkins and published by Container Corps in 2015.[102]
  • "Jessica Jackson Hutchins: Everything Erblaut" was published in 2013 by the Timothy Taylor Gallery and The Hepworth Wakefield.[103] Kirsty Bell and Colin Lang are contributors (text), with design help from the Purtill Family Business.[104]
  • "Convivium" was a collaboration of the visual arts of Hutchins and poetry of Tom Fisher. Published by Publication Studio, 2010.[105] [1]
  • Featured in the BOMB Magazine, edition no. 112 (Summer), in 2010, with an interview by Stuart Horodner.[4]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS: Biography". MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY. 
  2. ^ "JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS". PICA. The Portland Institute for Contemporary Art. 
  3. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins" (PDF). Timothy Taylor Gallery. 
  4. ^ a b Horodner, Stuart Horodner. "Jessica Jackson Hutchins". BOMB. BOMB Magazine. 
  5. ^ a b "Exhibition | Jessica Jackson Hutchins: Being Dispossessed at Marianne Boesky". C-File. 
  6. ^ lm. "Jessica Jackson Hutchins". Mom Culture. Mom Culture. 
  7. ^ Indrisek, Scott (May 18, 2015). "Couched in Longing: Jessica Jackson Hutchins's Domestic Scene" (PDF). Blouin Artinfo. Marianne Boesky Gallery. 
  8. ^ "STEPHEN MALKMUS AND THE JICKS: RULE PORTLANDIA". Magnet. 
  9. ^ "JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS". Columbus College of Art and Design. 
  10. ^ "PORTLAND2016 BIENNIAL OF CONTEMPORARY ART". Disjecta Contemporary Arts Center. 
  11. ^ "Upcoming Exhibitions". KMACMuseum. 
  12. ^ "(Not So) Still Life". Wave Hill; A public garden & cultural center. 
  13. ^ "Exhibitions". Redling Fine Art. 
  14. ^ "Esprit" (PDF). Adams and Ollman. 
  15. ^ "Exhibition Schedule". Cantor Arts Center. Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University. 
  16. ^ Heikes, Jay. "CONSEQUENCES". Fondazione Giuliani. 
  17. ^ "ASSISTED". KAVI GUPTA GALLERY. 
  18. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Confessions". Art Agenda. 
  19. ^ "rock hound swap meet". Junior Projects. 
  20. ^ "JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS: I DO CHOOSE". MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY. 
  21. ^ "Zabriskie Point". Jack Hanley Gallery. 
  22. ^ "LIVING IN THE MATERIAL WORLD; Press Information" (PDF). Galerie im Taxispalais. 
  23. ^ "Terra Firma". Reynolds Gallery. 
  24. ^ "OK GREAT THANKS THIS IS SO RIDICULOUS". ACME. 
  25. ^ Bell, Kirsty. "Jessica Jackson Hutchins; Coming II". 
  26. ^ "LIVING IN THE MATERIAL WORLD; MATERIALITY IN CONTEMPORARY ART". Kunstmuseen Krefeld. 
  27. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins: Unicorn Brochure". ISSUU. The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. 
  28. ^ "Various Artists; Archeo". High Line Art. 
  29. ^ "No. 1 Rainbow". The Green Gallery. 
  30. ^ "THE GROUND: CONNY PURTILL WITH FELIX CULPA, JAY HEIKES, JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS, BARRY MCGEE, TODD NORSTEN, TOBIN YELLAND AT ADAMS AND OLLMAN". ADAMS AND OLLMAN. 
  31. ^ "Trieste". Grimm. 
  32. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins". Galleries Now. 
  33. ^ "Genres: Jessica Jackson Hutchins". Eli and Edythe; Broad Art Museum. 
  34. ^ "The Suburban". Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland. 
  35. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins". The Hepworth Wakefield. 
  36. ^ "Changing States of Matter; Press Release". Brand New Gallery. 
  37. ^ "TRIESTE" (PDF). FEDERICA SCHIAVO GALLERY. 
  38. ^ "Prima Materia". Gladstone Gallery. 
  39. ^ Smith, Terri. "House Arrest" (PDF). Franklin Street Works. 
  40. ^ "OBJECTIFIED: SCULPTURE TODAY". Saatchi Gallery. 
  41. ^ "JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS". The Institute of Contemporary Art/ Boston. 
  42. ^ "Biennale de Lyon". e-flux. 
  43. ^ "Ryan Foerster, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Chadwick Rantanen". ArtCat. 
  44. ^ "RECLAIMED: NATURE AND PLACE THROUGH CONTEMPORARY EYES". SEATTLE ART MUSEUM. 
  45. ^ "PAUL CLAY". Salon 94. 
  46. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins: The Important Thing About A Chair". Atlanta Contemporary. 
  47. ^ "Memories are Made of This". Mutual Art. 
  48. ^ "Here/Now". Elizabeth Leach Gallery. 
  49. ^ "DWELLING". MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY. 
  50. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins" (PDF). Timothy Taylor Gallery. 
  51. ^ "JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS; Children of the Sunshine". PICA. 
  52. ^ "Exhibitions". Laurel Gitlen. 
  53. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins; Kitchen Table Allegory". Derek Eller Gallery. 
  54. ^ "2010: WHITNEY BIENNIAL". Whitney Museum of American Art. 
  55. ^ "The Jewel Thief". Tang. 
  56. ^ "Exhibition Announcement: "Art on Paper 2010: The 41st Exhibition"". Weatherspoon Art Museum. 
  57. ^ "FACE YOUR DEMONS" (PDF). Milliken Gallery. 
  58. ^ "Motherlode". Marylhurst University. Marylhurst University. 
  59. ^ "SUMMER PROJECTS". SAM. 
  60. ^ "KURT". DaDa. 
  61. ^ "Parenthesis". Westernbridge. 
  62. ^ "Dirt On Delight: Impulses That Form Clay". ICA. 
  63. ^ "Dirt on Delight: Impulses That Form Clay". WALKER ART CENTER. 
  64. ^ Hicks, Bob. "Review: 'Bent' at Oregon College of Art & Craft". Oregon Live. 
  65. ^ "Lover". On Stellar Rays. 
  66. ^ "Slough". David Nolan. 
  67. ^ "Exhibitions". GALERIE PERROTIN. 
  68. ^ "EXHIBITION/PUBLIC EVENT PROGRAM". Momenta Art. 
  69. ^ Shaw, Cameron. "ARE YOU WITH ME?". ArtForum. 
  70. ^ Bowie, Chas. "Jessica Jackson Hutchins; Hours and Ours". The Portland Mercury. 
  71. ^ "Presents". Chicago Reader. Sun-Times Media, LLC. 
  72. ^ a b c "Jessica Jackson Hutchins" (PDF). Marianne Boesky Gallery. 
  73. ^ "Gallery Begin Again Right Back Here, curated by B. Wurtz". White Columns. 
  74. ^ "Kinda Like a Buffet". PDX. 
  75. ^ "Journey to the Center of Uranus". ArtCat. 
  76. ^ "Summer Group Exhibition". Derek Eller Gallery. Derek Eller Gallery. 
  77. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins; The Exponent of Earth (You Make Me_)". Derek Eller Gallery. Derek Eller Gallery. 
  78. ^ "Visual Arts". The Portland Mercury. Index Newspapers LLC. 
  79. ^ Duncan, Michael. "Art Rock". TURNERPROJECTS. Richard Turner, TurnerProjects. 
  80. ^ "MICHELLE GRABNER'S NEVER QUITE HAPPY HOME". SOUTHFIRST. 
  81. ^ "2007; exhibitions". SHANE CAMPBELL GALLERY. 
  82. ^ COTTER, HOLLAND (August 9, 2007). "Go Ahead, Expect Surprises". The New York Times. The New York Times. 
  83. ^ "Hump". Paul Kotula Projects. 
  84. ^ "Place of the Transcommon" (PDF). Peck School of the Arts. 
  85. ^ "Visual Arts". The Portland Mercury. The Portland Mercury. 
  86. ^ "GROUP EXHIBITION". Derek Eller Gallery. 
  87. ^ "Your Beauty's Gold is Clay" (PDF). alexandre gallery. 
  88. ^ "JESSICA JACKSON HUTCHINS; North Room". Derek Eller Gallery. 
  89. ^ "Gone Formalism". Institute of Contemporary Art. University of Pennsylvania. 
  90. ^ "Inaugural Group Exhibition". Derek Eller Gallery. 
  91. ^ "About Ghosttown". Red76. 
  92. ^ "Make It Now: New Sculpture in New York". Sculpture Center. 
  93. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins" (PDF). Brand New Gallery. 
  94. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins". Derek Eller Gallery. 
  95. ^ "Brooklyn, New York; September, 2003 – August, 2005" (PDF). Champion Fine Art. 
  96. ^ "Art Star/Sausage Factory". RHIZOME. 
  97. ^ "Kitchen Table Allegory". Brooklyn Museum. 
  98. ^ "Hammer Contemporary Collection: Jessica Jackson Hutchins". Hammer Museum. Hammer Museum. 
  99. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins; online collections". Portland Art Museum. 
  100. ^ "ASH CUP". Seattle Art Museum. 
  101. ^ "ELBOWS". Whitney Museum of American Art. 
  102. ^ "Confessions / Jessica Jackson Hutchins : Container Corps". www.containercorps.com. Retrieved 2016-05-13. 
  103. ^ "Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Everything Erblaut". Google Books. 
  104. ^ "Publications". MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY. 
  105. ^ "Convivium". Google Books.