Jethwa

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Jethwa (or Jethva, Jaitwa, Jethi or Kamari, Camari, Kam(a)r) is a branch of the Suryavanshi Rajput clan.[citation needed]

Origin[edit]

Merchant Navy flag of Porbandar State adopted by Jethwas, showing image of Hanuman, from whom the Jethwas claim their descent.

It has been suggested that the Saindhava dynasty ruling eastern part of Saurashtra peninsula is now represented by the Jethwas. It is also suggested that the term Jethwa probably originating from Jayadratha (another name of Saindhawa dynasty), Jyeshtha (the elder branch) or Jyeshthuka from which the region derived its name Jyeshthukadesha.[1][need quotation to verify][2][need quotation to verify][3][need quotation to verify][4][need quotation to verify]

Other details and Kuldevis[edit]

The Jethwa Rajputs belong to the Gautam/Vajas Gotra and their Kuldevi is Vindhyavasini Devi.[5] Jethwas also worship Brahmani.[6] Again there is one aspect of devi, who is known as Jethwa Mata, who is identified as Gaur Matas or clan deities.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nanavati, J. M.; Dhaky, M. A. (1969-01-01). "The Maitraka and the Saindhava Temples of Gujarat". Artibus Asiae. Supplementum. 26: 83. doi:10.2307/1522666.
  2. ^ Kumar, Amit (2012). "Maritime History of India: An Overview". Maritime Affairs:Journal of the National Maritime Foundation of India. Taylor & Francis. 8 (1): 93–115. doi:10.1080/09733159.2012.690562. In 776 AD, Arabs tried to invade Sind again but were defeated by the Saindhava naval fleet. A Saindhava inscription provides information about these naval actions.
  3. ^ Vyas, Surendra (31 December 2001). "10. Bhutaamblika". A study of ancient towns of Gujarat (PhD). Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda. pp. 123–127. hdl:10603/72127. Retrieved 9 May 2017.
  4. ^ Ramesh Chandra Majumdar (1964). Ancient India. Motilal Banarsidass. p. 302.
  5. ^ [1] Folk art and culture of Gujarat: guide to the collection of the Shreyas Folk Museum of Gujarat, 1980
  6. ^ a b [2] Fairs and Festivals of India: Chhattisgarh, Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Daman and Diu, Goa, Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra