Jill Scott (footballer)

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Jill Scott
MBE
20171004 UWCL SKN-MCW StPoelten Jill Scott 850 1188.jpg
Scott with Manchester City in 2017
Personal information
Full name Jill Louise Scott[1]
Date of birth (1987-02-02) 2 February 1987 (age 34)[1]
Place of birth Sunderland, England
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.81 m)[1]
Position(s) Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Manchester City
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2004–2006 Sunderland
2006–2013 Everton 114 (21)
2013– Manchester City 111 (19)
2021Everton (loan) 11 (2)
National team
2006– England 153 (25)
2012– Great Britain 9 (1)
Honours
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 9 October 2021[2][3]
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 9 April 2021

Jill Louise Scott MBE (born 2 February 1987) is an English footballer who plays as a midfielder for Manchester City[4] and the England national team. The FIFA technical report into the 2011 Women's World Cup described Scott as one of England's four outstanding players; "[an] energetic, ball-winning midfielder who organises the team well, works hard at both ends of the pitch and can change her team's angle of attack."[5]

At 5 feet 11 inches (1.81 m) tall, Scott is nicknamed "Crouchy" after male international footballer Peter Crouch.[6][7] Since leaving home town club Sunderland for Everton in 2006, she contributed to the Blues' FA Women's Premier League Cup win in 2008 and FA Women's Cup victory in 2010. On the individual level Scott was voted 2008 FA Players' Player of the Year and 2011 FA International Player of the Year.

Early life[edit]

Scott grew up in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear and attended Monkwearmouth Comprehensive School.[8][9] A keen long-distance runner, Scott ran for Sunderland Harriers, winning the North of England Under-13 cross-country title and the Junior Great North Run,[10] whilst playing football for Boldon Girls. At age 13, she had to decide between football or running, and chose to concentrate on playing football.

After leaving school in 2003, Scott did a BTEC National Diploma in Sport and Exercise Science at Gateshead College. She remained at the college to study for a University of Sunderland foundation degree in sports and exercise development. She also played for the college football team alongside fellow Sunderland and international teammate Carly Telford.[10] After completing her diploma, both Scott and Telford enrolled at Loughborough University to study sport.

Club career[edit]

Sunderland[edit]

Scott began her senior career with Sunderland Women.[11] In October 2005, aged only 18 years, she won the Women's Player of the Month award for September, based on her performances for both her and club and also her country (at under-19 level).[12]

Everton[edit]

Scott joined Everton Ladies in July 2006,[13] having turned down an approach from Doncaster Rovers Belles.[14] Her first game for Everton came the following month, a 3–0 defeat against Arsenal Ladies in the FA Women's Community Shield.[15]

At the end of the 2007–08 season she picked up the FA Tesco Players' Player of the Year award. Also nominated were Arsenal's Alex Scott and Karen Carney.[16] In April 2012 Scott was appointed as one of eight digital media ambassadors, one from each team, who wear their Twitter account name on their shirt sleeves to raise the profile of the WSL.[17] Scott decided to leave Everton at the end of the 2013 season.[18]

During her first spell at Everton, Scott won the FA Women's Premier League Cup and the FA Women's Cup, playing in both finals.

Manchester City[edit]

Scott playing for Manchester City in 2017.

After leaving Everton, Scott signed a two-year deal with Manchester City.[19] This move proved a success, as she played her part in securing the Continental Cup Trophy for Manchester City in 2014.[20]

In April 2015, Scott was shown the red card and banned for three matches for headbutting Arsenal's Jade Bailey during Manchester City's 1–0 defeat.[21] In June 2020, Scott signed a new two-year contract which saw her take up a coaching role at the club.[22] At the 2020 Women's FA Community Shield on 29 August 2020, Scott was shown another red card for two bookable offences in Manchester City's scrappy 2–0 defeat by Chelsea at Wembley Stadium.[23]

Return to Everton (loan)[edit]

On 21 January 2021, Scott returned to Everton on loan for the remainder of the 2020–21 season.[24]

International career[edit]

England[edit]

Scott playing for England in 2014

At junior level, Scott played for the England Under-19s side, scoring three times in three games as England won through the first round of qualifying for the 2006 UEFA Under-19s tournament.[12] Her first call-up to the England senior squad came in May 2006, having captained the Under-19s side for the previous 18 months.[25] She made her debut for the England senior team against the Netherlands in August 2006, coming on as a late substitute for Kelly Smith in a 4–0 win.[26] She made the squad for the 2007 World Cup, coming on as a substitute in England's opening match against Japan. She went on to start the remainder of England's matches in the tournament, scoring her first international goal in the 6–1 demolition of Argentina in the group stage. England bowed out at the quarter-final stage after a 3–0 defeat against the United States.[27]

In May 2009, Scott was one of the first 17 female players to be given central contracts by The Football Association.[28] She was named in coach Hope Powell's squad for the 2009 UEFA Women's European Championships, scoring a late winner as England beat the Netherlands in the semi-final, having come on as a substitute for Jessica Clarke at the beginning of extra-time.[29]

At the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, Scott scored against New Zealand in England's 2–1 group B win. She put the English ahead against France in the quarter final, but did not take a penalty in England's 3-4 shootout defeat following a 1–1 draw.[30]

In February 2019, Scott pulled out of the England squad for the SheBelieves Cup.[31]

Scott was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2020 New Year Honours for services to women's football.[32]

On 23 February 2021, Scott made her 150th appearance for the England team in a game against Northern Ireland which she would captain and play the whole 90 minutes as England would win 6–0.[33][34]

Great Britain[edit]

In June 2012, Scott was named in an 18–player Great Britain squad for the 2012 London Olympics.[35]

In 2021, Scott was announced as one of the 22 woman squad for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.[36]

Personal life[edit]

Scott identifies as lesbian.[37] In March 2020, she announced her engagement to long-term partner Shelley Unitt.[38][39] Scott owns Boxx2Boxx coffee, a coffee shop in Manchester.[40]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

As of match played 27 February 2019[citation needed]
Club Season League National Cup League Cup Continental Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Sunderland 2004–05 FA WPL Northern
2005–06 FA WPL National
Total
Everton 2006–07 FA WPL National
2007–08
2008–09
2009–10
2011 FA WSL
2012
2013
Total
Manchester City 2014 FA WSL 14 4 2 0 7 1 23 5
2015 12 1 2 1 5 0 19 2
2016 14 3 2 0 3 1 2 1 21 5
2017 5 3 3 1 0 0 3 0 11 4
2017–18 16 7 3 0 6 0 8 1 33 8
2018–19 16 0 1 0 4 0 1 0 22 0
Total 77 18 13 2 25 2 14 2 129 24
Career total

International[edit]

Statistics accurate as of match played 27 July 2021.
Year England Great Britain
Apps Goals Apps Goals
2006 ? ? N/A
2007 ? ? N/A
2008 ? ? N/A
2009 ? ? N/A
2010 ? ? N/A
2011 ? ? N/A
2012 ? ? 3 0
2013 ? ? N/A
2014 ? ? N/A
2015 ? ? N/A
2016 ? ? N/A
2017 ? ? N/A
2018 ? ? N/A
2019 ? ? N/A
2020 ? ? N/A
2021 ? ? 3 0
Total 151 25 6 1

International goals[edit]

England[edit]

Scores and results list England's goal tally first.[41]
# Date Venue Opponent Result Competition Scored
1 25 October 2006 Städtisches Waldstadion, Aalen  Germany 1–5 Friendly 1
2 17 September 2007 Chengdu Longquanyi Football Stadium, Chengdu  Argentina 6–1 2007 FIFA World Cup 1
3 8 May 2008 Darida, Minsk  Belarus 6–1 UEFA Euro 2009 Qual. 1
4 28 September 2008 Ďolíček, Prague  Czech Republic 5–1 UEFA Euro 2009 Qual. 1
5 6 September 2009 Ratina Stadion, Tampere  Netherlands 2–1 2009 UEFA Championship 1
6 24 March 2010 Larnaca  South Africa 1–0 2010 Cyprus Cup 1
7 17 May 2011 Kassam Stadium, Oxford  Sweden 2–0 Friendly 1
8 1 July 2011 Glücksgas Stadium, Dresden  New Zealand 2–1 2011 FIFA World Cup 1
9 9 July 2011 BayArena, Leverkusen  France 1–1 2011 FIFA World Cup 1
11 21 June 2012 Ob Jezeru, Velenje  Slovenia 4–0 UEFA Euro 2013 Qual. 2
12 19 September 2012 Bescot Stadium, Walsall  Croatia 3–0 UEFA Euro 2013 Qual. 1
13 20 October 2012 Stade Sébastien Charléty, Paris  France 2–2 Friendly 1
14 5 April 2014 Falmer Stadium, Brighton and Hove  Montenegro 9–0 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Qual. 1
15 21 September 2015 A. Le Coq Arena, Tallinn  Estonia 8–0 UEFA Euro 2017 Qual. 1
16 29 November 2015 Ashton Gate, Bristol  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1–0 UEFA Euro 2017 Qual. 1
17 8 April 2016 New York Stadium, Rotherham  Belgium 1–1 UEFA Euro 2017 Qual. 1
18 7 June 2016 Sports Center of FA of Serbia, Stara Pazova  Serbia 7–0 UEFA Euro 2017 Qual. 1
19 15 September 2016 Meadow Lane, Nottingham  Estonia 5–0 UEFA Euro 2017 Qual. 1
20 1 March 2018 Mapfre Stadium, Columbus, Ohio, United States  France 4–1 2018 SheBelieves Cup 1
22 18 June 2018 Sapsan Arena, Moscow  Russia 3–1 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Qual. 2
23 31 August 2018 Rodney Parade, Newport  Wales 3–0 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Qual. 1
24 25 May 2019 Bescot Stadium, Walsall  Denmark 2–0 Friendly 1
25 27 June 2019 Stade Océane, Le Havre, France  Norway 3–0 2019 FIFA World Cup 1

Great Britain[edit]

Scores and results list Great Britain's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Result Competition Scored
1 28 July 2012 Millennium Stadium, Cardiff  Cameroon 3–0 2012 Olympic Games 1

Coaching career[edit]

In September 2008, Scott was appointed as the coach of the Women's Football Academy at Gateshead College, with former Darlington manager Mick Tait taking over as coach of the Men's Academy.[42]

Honours[edit]

Everton

Manchester City

England

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015: List of players: England" (PDF). FIFA. 6 July 2015. p. 10. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  2. ^ "Jill Scott". The FA. Retrieved 12 June 2017.
  3. ^ "Jill Scott". Soccer Way. Retrieved 12 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Jill Scott". Manchester City. Retrieved 15 October 2021.
  5. ^ "Technical Report and Statistics" (PDF). FIFA. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 December 2011. Retrieved 16 October 2011.
  6. ^ Alistair Magowan (8 July 2011). "Women's World Cup: England lifted by joker Jill Scott". BBC. Retrieved 16 October 2011.
  7. ^ "Jill Scott". The Independent. 10 September 2009. Retrieved 16 October 2011.
  8. ^ "Women's World Cup 2019: Mapping England's Lionesses squad". BBC Sport. 2 July 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  9. ^ "Durham County Schools FA - Past Players (S)". DurhamCountySchoolsFA. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  10. ^ a b "Sunderland star makes the full England squad". Sunderland University. 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  11. ^ "'She's so unselfish': history beckons for Jill Scott with 150th England cap | Suzanne Wrack". the Guardian. 22 February 2021. Retrieved 15 October 2021.
  12. ^ a b "Scotty gets top player award". Fair Game. 3 October 2005. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  13. ^ "Everton sign Scott". Fair Game. 31 July 2009. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  14. ^ "Belles miss Scott but chase Wright". Fair Game. 14 July 2006. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  15. ^ "Arsenal win community shield". Fair Game. 3 August 2006. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  16. ^ "Winners revealed". TheFA.com. 23 May 2008. Retrieved 26 July 2011.
  17. ^ "Women's Super League launches Twitter kit initiative to raise profile". BBC Sport. 4 April 2012. Retrieved 10 April 2012.
  18. ^ "Scott Leaves Blues". everton.fawsl.com. Archived from the original on 19 January 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2013.
  19. ^ "Jill Scott: England midfielder joins Manchester City". BBC Sport. 15 November 2013. Retrieved 24 January 2014.
  20. ^ "Jill Scott: Official Manchester City FC profile". Manchester City FC. Retrieved 9 February 2017.
  21. ^ Currie, Jo (20 April 2015). "Jill Scott: Manchester City Women player banned for headbutt". BBC Sport. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  22. ^ "Jill Scott: England midfielder signs new Manchester City contract as player-coach". BBC Sport. 11 June 2020. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  23. ^ "Chelsea beat Man City in women's Community Shield despite Kerr misses". The Sydney Morning Herald. 30 August 2020. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  24. ^ "ENGLAND GREAT SCOTT SEALS EVERTON WOMEN RETURN". Everton F.C. 21 January 2021. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  25. ^ "After 13-goal romp Hope warns against complacency". Give Me Football. 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  26. ^ "England Women 4–0 Holland Women 0". BBC Sport. 31 August 2006. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  27. ^ Tony Leighton (24 September 2007). "World Cup was a great experience – Scott". The Sunderland Echo. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  28. ^ "England Women awarded contracts". BBC Sport. 14 May 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  29. ^ "England Ladies 2–1 Holland Ladies". BBC Sport. 6 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  30. ^ https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/14094533
  31. ^ "Jill Scott: Manchester City midfielder pulls out of England squad for SheBelieves Cup". 24 February 2019 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  32. ^ "No. 62866". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 December 2019. p. N22.
  33. ^ Fisher, Bethany (24 February 2021). "Jill Scott: A journey to 150 caps for the Lionesses". Her Football Hub. Retrieved 19 May 2021.
  34. ^ Lea, Connie (23 February 2021). "New era begins for England with 6-0 victory over N. Ireland". Her Football Hub. Retrieved 19 May 2021.
  35. ^ "Team GB women's squad for London 2012 announced". BBC Sport. 26 June 2012. Retrieved 26 June 2012.
  36. ^ "Jill SCOTT". Olympics.com. Retrieved 15 October 2021.
  37. ^ "Visible Lesbian 100". Diva Magazine. April 2020. Retrieved 25 May 2020.
  38. ^ Turner, Alicia (18 March 2020). "England and Manchester City star Jill Scott announces engagement". NewsChain. Retrieved 25 May 2020.
  39. ^ "MARRIAGE STORY: The best of lez/bi love". DIVA. 20 March 2020. Retrieved 25 May 2020.
  40. ^ Hudson, Molly (29 May 2021). "Jill Scott: My age was no concern but something had to change to get me to the Tokyo Olympics". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 21 June 2021.
  41. ^ Karsdorp, Dirk (2018). The England Women's FC 1972 – 2018: The Lionesses – A Statistical Record. Soccer Books Ltd. ISBN 978-1-86223-391-1.
  42. ^ "Jill Scott's academy appointment". Fair Game. 10 September 2008. Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  43. ^ Leighton, Tony (12 March 2009). "England women win Cyprus Cup". The Guardian.
  44. ^ Leighton, Tony (13 March 2013). "Rachel Yankey volley earns England women their second Cyprus Cup title". The Guardian.
  45. ^ Lavery, Glenn (11 March 2015). "England 1-0 Canada: Cyprus Cup final match report". The Football Association.
  46. ^ "UEFA Women's EURO 2009 - Final". UEFA. 10 September 2009. Retrieved 7 July 2019.
  47. ^ "Match for third place - Match report" (PDF). FIFA. 4 July 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 July 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2019.

Further reading[edit]

  • Aluko, Eniola (2019), They Don't Teach This, Random House, ISBN 9781473564480
  • Caudwell, Jayne (2013), Women's Football in the UK: Continuing with Gender Analyses, Taylor & Francis, ISBN 9781317966234
  • Clarke, Gemma (2019), Soccerwomen: The Icons, Rebels, Stars, and Trailblazers Who Transformed the Beautiful Game, ISBN 9781568589206
  • Dunn, Carrie (2019), Pride of the Lionesses: The Changing Face of Women's Football in England, Pitch Publishing (Brighton) Limited, ISBN 9781785315411
  • Dunn, Carrie (2016), The Roar of the Lionesses: Women's Football in England, Pitch Publishing Limited, ISBN 9781785311512
  • Grainey, Timothy (2012), Beyond Bend It Like Beckham: The Global Phenomenon of Women's Soccer, University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 0803240368
  • Smith, Kelly (2012), Footballer: My Story, Transworld, ISBN 9781446488591
  • Stay, Shane (2019), The Women's World Cup 2019 Book: Everything You Need to Know About the Soccer World Cup, Books on Demand, ISBN 1782551921
  • Theivam, Keiran and Jeff Kassouf (2019), The Making of the Women's World Cup: Defining stories from a sport’s coming of age, Little, ISBN 1472143310

External links[edit]