Jim Baikie

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Jim Baikie
Born James George Baikie
(1940-02-28)28 February 1940
Orkney, Scotland
Died 29 December 2017(2017-12-29) (aged 77)[1]
Orkney, Scotland[2]
Nationality Scottish
Area(s) Penciller, Inker
Notable works
Skizz

James George 'Jim' Baikie (28 February 1940 – 29 December 2017) was a Scottish comics artist best known for his work with Alan Moore on Skizz and a musician.

Biography[edit]

Baikie served as a Corporal with the Royal Air Force in 1956-63 before joining a printing company. Baikie joined Morgan-Grampian studio as an artist in 1964 and was an illustrator for the National Savings Committee in 1965-66. Balkie was a bass guitarist in bands James Fenda and the Vulcans and Compass among others.[3]

Baikie began his comics career illustrating Valentine for Fleetway. Over the next twenty years, he built a solid reputation working for TV comics such as Look-in, including adaptations of The Monkees and Star Trek, all scripted by Angus P. Allan. He also worked extensively in girls' comics such as Jinty. In the 1980s, Baikie drew The Twilight World in Warrior.

In Britain, he is probably best known for collaborating with Alan Moore on Skizz. Baikie was so attached to the character that he went on to both write and illustrate Skizz II and Skizz III for 2000AD. 2000 AD spin-of Crisis also saw Baikie produce the art for the New Statesmen story.

Baikie has also worked extensively in the United States, on superhero strips such as Batman and The Spectre. In 1986, he co-created Electric Warrior with writer Doug Moench.[4] A new collaboration with Alan Moore also appeared in the guise of the First American.

Bibliography[edit]

Comics work includes:

  • Star Trek
  • Jinty:
    • "Left-Out Linda", 1974
    • "The Kat and Mouse Game", 1975
    • "Face The Music, Flo!", 1975
    • "Ping-Pong Paula", 1975
    • "Miss No-Name", 1976
    • "Willa on Wheels", 1976
    • "Rose Among the Thornes", 1976
    • "Spell of the Spinning Wheel", 1977
    • "Fran'll Fix It!", 1977
    • "Two Mothers for Maggie", 1977
    • "Wild Rose", 1978
    • "Fran'll Fix It!" (sequel), 1978
    • "The Forbidden Garden", 1979
    • "Village of Fame", 1979
    • "White Water", 1980
  • Tammy
    • "Glen - Lonely Dog on a Quest" 1971
  • Skizz:
    • "Skizz" (with Alan Moore, in 2000 AD #308-330, 1983)
    • "Alien Cultures" (script and art, in 2000 AD #767-775, 1992)
    • "Skizz Book 3" (script and art, in 2000 AD #912-927, 1994–1995)
  • Twilight World (in Warrior #14-17, 1983)
  • Bloodfang (in Eagle #116-127, 1983)
  • Judge Dredd
    • "The Switch" (with John Wagner/Alan Grant, in 2000 AD #369, 1984)
    • "Oz" (with John Wagner/Alan Grant, in 2000 AD #546 and 569-570, 1987–1988)
    • "Hitman (with John Wagner/Alan Grant, in 2000 AD #571-573, 1988)
    • "In the Bath" (with John Wagner, in 2000 AD #626, 1989)
    • "Little Spuggy's Xmas" (with John Wagner, in 2000 AD #658, 1989)
    • "Midnite's Children" (with John Wagner, in Judge Dredd Megazine #1.01-1.05, 1990–1991)
    • "An Everyday Disaster" (with John Wagner, in 2000 AD #1309, 2002)
  • New Statesmen (with John Smith, in Crisis #1-4, #9-12 and #28, 1988–1989)
  • Vigilante #17-18 (with Alan Moore, DC Comics, 1985)
  • Electric Warrior #1–18 (with Doug Moench, DC Comics, 1986–1987)
  • "Clive Barker's Nightbreed" #1-4 (with Alan Grant, Epic comics, 1990)
  • Amadeus Wolf: "Cursitor Doom - The Man Who Died Every Day" (with John Tomlinson, in 2000AD Action Special, 1992)
  • Tharg's Future Shocks: "Hot Iron" (script and art, in 2000 AD #797, 1992)
  • Black Mask (with Brian Augustyn, 2-issue mini-series, DC Comics, 1995)
  • Star Wars: Empire's End (with Tom Veitch, 3-issue mini-series, Dark Horse Comics)
  • "First American and U.S.Angel" (with Alan Moore, in Tomorrow Stories #1-12, America's Best Comics, 1999–2003)
  • Deathblow By Blows (with Alan Moore, Wildstorm, 2000)
  • The Victorian #8-11 (with Len Wein, Penny Farthing Press, 2001)
  • "The First American: How Come Nobody Likes The First American These Days?" (with Alan Moore, in Tomorrow Stories Special #2, America's Best Comics, 2006)

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Jim Baikie, Creator Of Skizz, Electric Warrior And First American, Dies Aged 77 - Bleeding Cool News And Rumors". Bleeding Cool News And Rumors. 30 December 2017. Retrieved 30 December 2017. 
  2. ^ "Jim Baikie RIP!". Everything Comes Back To 2000AD. 30 December 2017. Retrieved 30 December 2017. 
  3. ^ "Jim Baikie". BandToBand. Retrieved 30 December 2017. 
  4. ^ Powers, Tom (August 2017). "Does Doug Moench Still Dream of Electric Warrior?". Back Issue!. Raleigh, North Carolina: TwoMorrows Publishing (98): 50–59. 
  5. ^ 2000 Will Eisner Comic Industry Award Nominees Winners, Comic Book Awards Almanac

References[edit]