Jim Rutenberg

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Jim Rutenberg
Jim Rutenberg @ SXSW 2016 (cropped).jpg
Rutenberg in 2016
Born
United States
OccupationJournalist
Spouse(s)Ondine Karady

Jim Rutenberg is a writer at large for The New York Times and The New York Times Magazine. He has written over 2,300 articles for The New York Times.[1]

Career[edit]

After finishing college in 1991, Rutenberg began working for the New York Daily News as a gossip stringer. He eventually worked his way up to becoming a general assignment reporter. In 1996, he was hired on staff and became a transit beat reporter. He left the Daily News in 1999 to work as a TV reporter for The New York Observer. One year later, he began working for The New York Times, where he was responsible for covering media and local politics. He has also served as City Hall Bureau Chief,[2] and later as chief political correspondent for the Sunday magazine.[3] In January 2016 he was named media columnist.[3] In January 2020, he became a writer at large for The New York Times and The New York Times Magazine.[4]

Family[edit]

Rutenberg is married to designer Ondine Karady.[5]

Awards[edit]

Selected bibliography[edit]

  1. "Part 1: Imperial Reach", April 3, 2019[7]
  2. "Part 2: Internal Divisions", April 3, 2019[8]
  3. "Part 3: The New Fox Weapon", April 3, 2019[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jim Rutenberg". The New York Times. Archived from the original on July 16, 2016. Retrieved February 7, 2017.
  2. ^ "Jim Rutenberg". Center for Communication. 2005. Archived from the original on March 9, 2014. Retrieved February 7, 2017.
  3. ^ a b Somaiya, Ravi (January 12, 2016). "New York Times Names New Media Columnist". New York Times. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
  4. ^ "New Role for Jim Rutenberg". The New York Times Company. January 22, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  5. ^ IMDb
  6. ^ Trounson, Rebecca (November 13, 2020). "Anderson School of Management announces 2020 Loeb Award winners in business journalism" (Press release). UCLA Anderson School of Management. Retrieved November 13, 2020.
  7. ^ Mahler, Jonathan; Rutenberg, Jim (April 3, 2019). "Part 1: Imperial Reach". The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  8. ^ Mahler, Jonathan; Rutenberg, Jim (April 3, 2019). "Part 2: Internal Divisions". The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  9. ^ Mahler, Jonathan; Rutenberg, Jim (April 3, 2019). "Part 3: The New Fox Weapon". The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved November 16, 2020.

External links[edit]