Jim Stott

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For other people with the same name, see James Stott.
James Stott
Personal information
Full name James Stott
Nickname Jim
Born 15 November 1919
Prescot district, England
Died 6 July 1994 (aged 74)
Playing information
Position Centre
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1939–52 St. Helens 193 65 295 0 785
1942 Wigan (guest) 2 3 0 9
Total 195 68 295 0 794
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
≥1939–≤52 Lancashire 2
1943–47 England 3 0 0 0 0
1947 Great Britain 1 0 0 0 0
Source: rugbyleagueproject.org englandrl.co.uk

James "Jim" Stott (15 November 1919[1] — 6 July 1994 (aged 74)) born in Prescot district, was an English professional rugby league footballer of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, playing at representative level for Great Britain, England, and Lancashire, and at club level for St. Helens, as a Centre, i.e. number 3 or 4. Jim Stott was a Private in the British Army during World War II,[2] and appeared for Wigan as a wartime guest player.[3]

Playing career[edit]

International honours[edit]

Jim Stott won caps for England while at St. Helens, in a 1943 match against Wales and in 1946 and 1947 matches against France,[4] and won caps for Great Britain while at St. Helens, in a 1947 match against New Zealand.[5]

Other notable Games[edit]

Jim Stott was a reserve for Northern Command XIII against a Rugby League XIII at Thrum Hall, Halifax on Saturday 21 March 1942.[2]

Honoured at St Helens RLFC[edit]

Jim Stott is a St Helens R.F.C. Hall of Fame inductee.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "inside programme, Northern Command v. A Rugby League XIII, 1942". rugbyleagueoralhistory.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  3. ^ Latham, Michael; Gate, Robert (1992). They played for Wigan. Adlington: Mike R.L. ISBN 978-0-9516098-2-8. 
  4. ^ "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  5. ^ "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  6. ^ "St Helens Hall of Fame". saints.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 

External links[edit]