Jimmi Clay

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Jimmi Clay
Jimmi Clay.jpg
Doctors character
Portrayed by Adrian Lewis Morgan
Duration 2005–
First appearance 5 September 2005
Introduced by Peter Eryl Lloyd
Spin-off
appearances
Fallout: Part 3
Classification Present; regular
Profile
Occupation General practitioner; Clinical Lead
Home Letherbridge

Dr. Jimmi Clay is a fictional character in the BBC soap opera Doctors, played by Adrian Lewis Morgan. He made his first appearance on 5 September 2005. He is currently the longest serving character since the departure of Julia Parsons.

Storylines[edit]

Background[edit]

Jimmi's mother was killed in a car accident when he was eight. He was raised by his father and elder sister. His father ruled with an iron fist and locked Jimmi in the cupboard under the stairs whenever he misbehaved. As a result, Jimmi suffers from claustrophobia and OCD.

2005—[edit]

Jimmi had a romance with receptionist Sarah Finch and they became engaged, but it didn't last long as she left The Mill to emigrate. In 2007-2008, Jimmi was romantically involved with DI Eva Moore. But this romance ended in October 2008, because Eva had to go into witness protection and leave Letherbridge. In April 2009, he helped colleague Karen Hollins try to lose weight at her request. However she was seen sneaking in chocolate and crisps and, not surprisingly, Jimmi started to get fed up with her. Daniel Granger and Lily Hassan also accused Jimmi of creating a smell in reception, but this was discovered to be caused by the cabbage soup Jimmi had encouraged Karen to try as part of her diet. Jimmi had his own show on Radio Letherbridge and won "The Golden Microphone" Award for the show. On December 17, 2009, Jimmi carried out a house call in the countryside. It was dark and there was no answer at the house; walking back to his car assuming no one was home, he was nearly hit by another car which suddenly sped up the drive. The next day the Mill had its Christmas party and Julia wondered why he was not present. Simon said he had probably gone on holiday early, but at the end of the episode Jimmi was seen drugged and unconscious, tied to a radiator.

In January 2010, it became clear to the viewer that Jimmi had been kidnapped by Sissy and Ivor Juggins. Julia was worried about Jimmi and asked Rob (Karen's husband) to look for him as it was unlike him to leave so suddenly. Sissy, a big fan of Dr. Jimmi, had told him that she wanted a baby with him. Jimmi obviously did not feel the same way and attempted to resist her at every opportunity, despite being heavily drugged for much of the time. Ivor agreed to keep Jimmi hostage, because he also had romantic feelings for him - Sissy was unaware of this. She was also unaware that Ivor disliked having to look after her and sharing their home, resulting in many sibling arguments which Jimmi quickly learnt to exploit with his multiple (failed) escape attempts. Jimmi finally managed to escape by himself on January 21, 2010, after Ivor and Sissy had a visit from Rob, who was looking into Jimmi's disappearance. Ivor decided they had to get rid of the doctor by putting him in the shed. Sissy gave Jimmi the keys to his feet chains, as he convinced her they would run away together, but Jimmi escaped after beating Ivor off with a house brick. Sissy dropped the knife she had picked up and let him get away. When Jimmi was recovering in hospital, Julia was shocked at the effect the kidnapping had had on him; but he was quick to make clear to reporters that Sissy and Ivor had mental health problems and needed treatment not punishment. When Jimmi visited a young patient, he suffered a panic attack when the patient and her mother appeared to be his fans. However his symptoms worsened when their actions became similar to those of Sissy and Ivor. He nearly deserted them when he felt that he couldn't cope, but decided to change his mind when the patient's mother reassured him that they wouldn't harm him.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kilkelly, Daniel (6 January 2012). "'War Of The Worlds'". Digital Spy. Hearst Magazines UK. Retrieved 9 September 2012. 

External links[edit]