Jimmy McGhee

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Jimmy McGhee
Personal information
Full name James McGhee
Place of birth Edinburgh, Scotland
Playing position Inside Forward
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1920–1921 Wolfenden Shore
1921–1922 Harrison Soccer Club 5 (0)
1922–1923 Philadelphia Field Club 22 (6)
1924–1926 Philadelphia Field Club 16 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

James "Jimmy" McGhee (born in Edinburgh, Scotland) was a Scottish soccer inside forward who spent at least four seasons in the first division American Soccer League.

Youth[edit]

McGhee was the son of former Hibernian player and Heart of Midlothian manager James McGhee, and the brother of National Soccer Hall of Fame forward Bart McGhee. McGhee's father was a renowned Scottish player who appeared with Scotland in an 1886 game with Wales. McGhee's father had a controversial term as the manager of Hearts. When he finally resigned on December 6, 1909, he began assessing his options. In September 1910 he decided to leave Scotland and emigrate to the United States. It took James McGhee two years to get settled and it was not until 1912 that Jimmy, his mother and brother Bart joined his father in the U.S. When they arrived in the U.S., the family settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Playing[edit]

Amateur[edit]

McGhee spent at least one season, 1920–21, playing alongside his brother Bart on the front line of Wolfenden Shore of the Allied American Football Association.[1]

Professional[edit]

In 1921, McGhee signed with Harrison Soccer Club of the newly established American Soccer League.[2] In 1922, he moved to Philadelphia Field Club for the 1922–23 season. In 1924, he rejoined the team for two seasons.[3]

Misspelled last name[edit]

Some sources list McGhee as Magee when he played for Harrison S.C.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ October 25, 1920 The Globe
  2. ^ December 12, 1921 The Globe
  3. ^ Jose, Colin (1998). American Soccer League, 1921–1931 (Hardback). The Scarecrow Press. (ISBN 0-8108-3429-4). 
  4. ^ September 19, 1921 New York Times