Jimmy McKinnell

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Jimmy McKinnell
Personal information
Full name James Templeton Broadfoot McKinnell
Date of birth (1893-03-27)27 March 1893
Place of birth Dalbeattie, Scotland
Date of death October quarter 1972 (aged 79)
Place of death Brixworth, England
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Playing position Left-half
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1913–1914 Ayr United ? (?)
1914–19xx Nithsdale Wanderers ? (?)
19xx–1919 Dumfries ? (?)
1919–1920 Queen of the South ? (?)
1920–1926 Blackburn Rovers 111 (0)
1926–1929 Darlington 101 (1)
1929–1930 Nelson 10 (0)
Teams managed
1938–1947 Queen of the South
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Jimmy McKinnell from Dalbeattie was a professional footballer who played for Dumfries club Queen of the South F.C. and Blackburn Rovers.

Jimmy McKinnell moved from Queen of the South to Blackburn Rovers in 1920. He made seven appearances and scored three goals. McKinnell was one of the three players to make such a move in a short time frame along with Willie McCall and Tom Wylie. This along with the transfer of Ian Dickson to Aston Villa helped fund Queens' purchase of Palmerston Park.[1]

McKinnell made 111 top league and 13 F.A. Cup appearances for Blackburn before leaving in 1926. He then had spells with Darlington, where he played over 100 competitive matches,[2] and Nelson before his retirement in the summer of 1930.[3] McKinnell was a left half.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Details of Queen of the South's purchase of Palmerston Park in the feature on Ian Dickson Archived 2009-09-17 at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ Joyce, Michael (2004). Football League Players' Records 1888–1939. Nottingham: SoccerData. p. 171. ISBN 1-899468-67-6. 
  3. ^ Dykes, Garth (2009). Nelson FC in the Football League. Nottingham: SoccerData. pp. 52–53. ISBN 978-1-905891-29-0. 
  4. ^ Connections between Dumfries and Blackburn Rovers in the Queen of the South profile on Jackie Oakes Archived 2009-02-26 at the Wayback Machine.