Jineterismo

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In Cuba, jineterismo is a category of illegal or semi-legal economic activities related to tourism in Cuba.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17] Prostitution is a way some Cubans use to get out of Cuba, having sex with a tourist for help getting off the island nation. These activities include prostitution and pimping, as well as other forms of hustling, such as selling black-market and counterfeit goods. The term derives from the Spanish jinete ("horserider").[18] A jinetera is Cuban slang for a female sex worker. The United States Department of State defines jinetero as:

[19]

Prostitution in Cuba[edit]

Prostitution in Cuba is illegal and has been since 1959.[20][21][22][23] Prostitutes in Cuba are called Jineteras.[24][25] Child prostitution is widespread especially in the more urban areas the clientale is mainly sex tourists.[26][27]

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union prostitution has grown.[28][29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ditmore, Melissa Hope (1 January 2006). "Encyclopedia of Prostitution and Sex Work". Greenwood Publishing Group. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  2. ^ Whiteford, Linda M.; Branch, Laurence G. (1 January 2008). "Primary Health Care in Cuba: The Other Revolution". Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  3. ^ Bunck, Julie Marie (1 November 2010). "Fidel Castro and the Quest for a Revolutionary Culture in Cuba". Penn State Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  4. ^ Morad, Dr Moshe (28 January 2015). "Fiesta de diez pesos: Music and Gay Identity in Special Period Cuba". Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  5. ^ Miller, John; Kenedi, Aaron (1 January 2003). "Inside Cuba: The History, Culture, and Politics of an Outlaw Nation". Da Capo Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  6. ^ Cap, Fr Pat Sullivan O. F. M. (11 July 2012). "Four Years In Castro's Cuba: An American Priest's Experience 1994-1998". AuthorHouse. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  7. ^ Griffiths, Tom G.; Millei, Zsuzsa (11 September 2012). "Logics of Socialist Education: Engaging with Crisis, Insecurity and Uncertainty". Springer Science & Business Media. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  8. ^ Hamilton, Carrie (12 March 2012). "Sexual Revolutions in Cuba: Passion, Politics, and Memory". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  9. ^ Kempadoo, Kamala (1 January 1999). "Sun, Sex, and Gold: Tourism and Sex Work in the Caribbean". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  10. ^ Brenner, Philip (1 January 2008). "A Contemporary Cuba Reader: Reinventing the Revolution". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  11. ^ Sippial, Tiffany A. (1 January 2013). "Prostitution, Modernity, and the Making of the Cuban Republic, 1840-1920". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  12. ^ Ditmore, Melissa Hope (1 January 2006). "Encyclopedia of Prostitution and Sex Work". Greenwood Publishing Group. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  13. ^ "Cuba Counters Prostitution with AIDS Program". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  14. ^ (www.dw.com), Deutsche Welle. "Why prostitution is a powerful metaphor in Cuban film - Film - DW.COM - 08.11.2016". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  15. ^ "How Cuba became the newest hotbed for tourists craving sex with minors". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "Canadians are major customers in Cuba's child sex market - Toronto Star". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  17. ^ "Visit Cuba - it's the perfect holiday destination for poverty fetishists - Coffee House". 23 July 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  18. ^ Cynthia Pope, "The Political Economy of Desire: Geographies of Female Sex Work in Havana, Cuba", Journal of International Women's Studies 6, no. 2 (June 2005): pp 101
  19. ^ "Cuba". U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 2009-04-09. 
  20. ^ Bunck, Julie Marie (1 November 2010). "Fidel Castro and the Quest for a Revolutionary Culture in Cuba". Penn State Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  21. ^ Morad, Dr Moshe (28 January 2015). "Fiesta de diez pesos: Music and Gay Identity in Special Period Cuba". Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  22. ^ Miller, John; Kenedi, Aaron (1 January 2003). "Inside Cuba: The History, Culture, and Politics of an Outlaw Nation". Da Capo Press. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  23. ^ Cap, Fr Pat Sullivan O. F. M. (11 July 2012). "Four Years In Castro's Cuba: An American Priest's Experience 1994-1998". AuthorHouse. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  24. ^ Ditmore, Melissa Hope (1 January 2006). "Encyclopedia of Prostitution and Sex Work". Greenwood Publishing Group. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  25. ^ Whiteford, Linda M.; Branch, Laurence G. (1 January 2008). "Primary Health Care in Cuba: The Other Revolution". Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  26. ^ "Canadians are major customers in Cuba's child sex market - Toronto Star". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  27. ^ "How Cuba became the newest hotbed for tourists craving sex with minors". Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  28. ^ "Visit Cuba - it's the perfect holiday destination for poverty fetishists - Coffee House". 23 July 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  29. ^ Griffiths, Tom G.; Millei, Zsuzsa (11 September 2012). "Logics of Socialist Education: Engaging with Crisis, Insecurity and Uncertainty". Springer Science & Business Media. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  30. ^ Hamilton, Carrie (12 March 2012). "Sexual Revolutions in Cuba: Passion, Politics, and Memory". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  31. ^ Kempadoo, Kamala (1 January 1999). "Sun, Sex, and Gold: Tourism and Sex Work in the Caribbean". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  32. ^ Brenner, Philip (1 January 2008). "A Contemporary Cuba Reader: Reinventing the Revolution". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  33. ^ Sippial, Tiffany A. (1 January 2013). "Prostitution, Modernity, and the Making of the Cuban Republic, 1840-1920". UNC Press Books. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  34. ^ Ditmore, Melissa Hope (1 January 2006). "Encyclopedia of Prostitution and Sex Work". Greenwood Publishing Group. Retrieved 26 January 2017 – via Google Books. 
  35. ^ "Cuba Counters Prostitution with AIDS Program". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  36. ^ (www.dw.com), Deutsche Welle. "Why prostitution is a powerful metaphor in Cuban film - Film - DW.COM - 08.11.2016". Retrieved 26 January 2017.