Jingzhe

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Jingzhe
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese驚蟄
Simplified Chinese惊蛰
Literal meaningawakening of insects
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese alphabetkinh trập
Chữ Hán驚蟄
Korean name
Hangul
경칩
Hanja
驚蟄
Japanese name
Kanji啓蟄
Hiraganaけいちつ
Solar term
  Longitude     Term     Calendar
  Spring
  315°   Lichun    4 – 5 February
  330°   Yushui   18–19 February
  345°   Jingzhe    5 – 6 March
  0°   Chunfen   20–21 March
  15°   Qingming    4 – 5 April
  30°   Guyu   20–21 April
  Summer
  45°   Lixia    5 – 6 May
  60°   Xiaoman   21–22 May
  75°   Mangzhong    5 – 6 June
  90°   Xiazhi   21–22 June
  105°   Xiaoshu    7 – 8 July
  120°   Dashu   22–23 July
  Autumn
  135°   Liqiu    7 – 8 August
  150°   Chushu   23–24 August
  165°   Bailu    7 – 8 September
  180°   Qiufen   23–24 September
  195°   Hanlu    8 – 9 October
  210°   Shuangjiang     23–24 October
  Winter
  225°   Lidong    7 – 8 November
  240°   Xiaoxue   22–23 November
  255°   Daxue    7 – 8 December
  270°   Dongzhi   21–22 December
  285°   Xiaohan    5 – 6 January
  300°   Dahan   20–21 January

Jīngzhé, Keichitsu, Gyeongchip, or Kinh trập is the 3rd of the 24 solar terms (節氣) in the traditional East Asian calendars. It begins when the Sun reaches the celestial longitude of 345° and ends when it reaches the longitude of 360°. More often, it refers to the day when the Sun is exactly at a celestial longitude of 345°. In the Gregorian calendar, it usually begins around March 5 and ends around March 20.[1][2]

The word 驚蟄 means the awakening of hibernating insects. is to startle and means hibernating insects. Traditional Chinese folklore says that during Jingzhe, thunderstorms will wake up the hibernating insects, which implies that the weather is getting warmer.[3]

Pentads[edit]

Each solar term can be divided into 3 pentads (候). They are the first pentad (初候), the second pentad (次候), and the third pentad (末候): Pentads in Jingzhe are

China
Japan
  • First pentad: Japanese: 蟄虫啓戸 (Romanisation: Chitchū kei to), 'Awakening of hibernating insects'.
  • Second pentad: Japanese: 桃始笑 (Romanisation: Momo Hajime Emi), 'Peach trees start to bloom (smile)'.
  • Last pentad: Japanese: 菜虫化蝶 (Romanisation: Na mushi-ka chō), 'Caterpillars become butterflies'.

Date and time[edit]

Date and Time (UTC)
year begin end
辛巳 2001-03-05 12:32 2001-03-20 13:30
壬午 2002-03-05 18:27 2002-03-20 19:16
癸未 2003-03-06 00:04 2003-03-21 00:59
甲申 2004-03-05 05:55 2004-03-20 06:48
乙酉 2005-03-05 11:45 2005-03-20 12:33
丙戌 2006-03-05 17:28 2006-03-20 18:25
丁亥 2007-03-05 23:18 2007-03-21 00:07
戊子 2008-03-05 04:58 2008-03-20 05:48
己丑 2009-03-05 10:47 2009-03-20 11:43
庚寅 2010-03-05 16:46 2010-03-20 17:32
辛卯 2011-03-05 22:29 2011-03-20 23:20
壬辰 2012-03-05 04:21 2012-03-20 05:14
癸巳 2013-03-05 10:14 2013-03-20 11:01
甲午 2014-03-05 16:02 2014-03-20 16:57
Source: JPL Horizons On-Line Ephemeris System

References[edit]

  1. ^ "24 Solar Terms". Travel China Guide. Retrieved 12 September 2017. In 2017 ... The Waking of Insects (Jing Zhe) Mar. 5th Hibernating animals come to sense
  2. ^ Jīngzhé,ABC Chinese–English Dictionary: Alphabetically Based Computerized, page 308, by John DeFrancis (1999; University of Hawaiʻi Press; ISBN 978-0824821548)
  3. ^ Shu, Catherine (27 February 2009). "South Village welcomes spring with snacks — and an eye on environmental awareness". Taipei Times. Retrieved 7 January 2017.
Preceded by
Yushui (雨水)
Solar term (節氣) Succeeded by
Chunfen (春分)